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Is Pluto a Planet? An Animated Explanation Sets the Record Straight

Is Pluto a Planet? An Animated Explanation Sets the Record Straight | SuperCore | Scoop.it
A brief history of why the word "planet" isn't very helpful.

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Global shark conservation plan in the balance at landmark talks - The Guardian

Global shark conservation plan in the balance at landmark talks - The Guardian | SuperCore | Scoop.it
Global shark conservation plan in the balance at landmark talksThe GuardianThe market for shark fins, used in shark fin soup, is a major threat to shark populations, with fins among the most expensive fish products in the world at $740 (£456) per...
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Why Wikipedia Doesn't Belong In The Classroom

Why Wikipedia Doesn't Belong In The Classroom | SuperCore | Scoop.it

Counterpoint to using Wikipedia in school! Where do you stand?


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Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | SuperCore | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.

 

The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 

 

Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective. 


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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

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Tour the States - Music Video

Full album: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats Music by Renald Francoeur Drawing by Craighton Berman "Tour the States" is track #1 from Brain Beats, a mnemonic CD...

 

It’s so often stated that geography education is so much more than just learning states and capitals. I wholeheartedly endorse that sentiment, but there is still some rudimentary importance to learning about where places are. I see it as analogous for English majors needing to learn basic grammar. You can’t write a masterpiece if you are still fumbling around with the alphabet. In geography, we can't have a nuanced discussion of place and interconnectedness if we have no sense of where any place actually is.

 

Tags: USA, K12, video, GeographyEducation.


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Gillian & Alexis's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:11 PM

A great, to-the-point video showing the political geography of the United States. Quick and fast facts on the 50 states and capitals made into a catchy song! Chosen for poltical geography content. TOPIC: Geography-Location

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Many Students Find Schoolwork 'Too Easy,' Report Says

Many Students Find Schoolwork 'Too Easy,' Report Says | SuperCore | Scoop.it
Veteran Education Week reporters Catherine Gewertz and Erik Robelen bring you news and analysis of issues at the core of classroom learning.

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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | SuperCore | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpast.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
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Africa Next

Africa Next | SuperCore | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?

 

This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 

 

Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry. 


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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
Aliah Therese's curator insight, April 3, 2016 9:48 AM
I
Its not just artists that reach struggle with certain issues.
 
Rescooped by Michael Sandstrom from Social Media Classroom
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Why Wikipedia Does Belong in the Classroom

Why Wikipedia Does Belong in the Classroom | SuperCore | Scoop.it
The proper place of social media in the classroom remains a mystery to most people, with Wikipedia standing as the biggest, baddest new media nemesis of them all.

 

This is what I tell my students every semester: "Wikipedia is not a bad place to start research--just make sure that it doesn't stop there." 

 


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 20, 2012 4:55 PM
This is very interesting as many professors cringe at the word Wikipedia. The site can be edited however usually a good resource on wikipedia will have sources and links at the end of the page.
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MAP OF THE DAY: The World's Most Extreme Deforestation

MAP OF THE DAY: The World's Most Extreme Deforestation | SuperCore | Scoop.it

This Map shows Brazil at Extreme Risk for Deforestation.  As we learned in Geography class maps can highlight important infomation and give us a better understanding. 


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Climate change deniers are almost extinct

Climate change deniers are almost extinct | SuperCore | Scoop.it
According to a recent poll, only two per cent of Canadians reject the overwhelming scientific evidence that Earth is warming at alarming rates...
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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | SuperCore | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | SuperCore | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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Curiosity lands on Mars! | Science News for Kids

Curiosity lands on Mars! | Science News for Kids | SuperCore | Scoop.it
NASA successfully delivered a $2.5 billion robotic vehicle to Mars, one that will explore for signs that the planet might once have hosted life...

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Xbox, Not Windows, Is The Future Of Microsoft - Says Steve Ballmer

Xbox, Not Windows, Is The Future Of Microsoft - Says Steve Ballmer | SuperCore | Scoop.it

Who says you'll never learn anything from video games? Certainly not Bill Gates!


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The Vile Anti-Muslim Video Shows That the U.S. Overvalues Free Speech

The Vile Anti-Muslim Video Shows That the U.S. Overvalues Free Speech | SuperCore | Scoop.it

Hi there, gang. This article, which some might deem controversial, poses an interesting question: is the First Amendment -- our American right to freedom of speech -- always a good thing? Are there times when freedom of speech can be dangerous and, if so, should this freedom be limited? If you choose to read this article, I only ask that you think about the topic, form an opinion, and express your thoughts persuasively in your "World Around Us" journal. Happy reading!


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The Geography of Foreign Aid

The Geography of Foreign Aid | SuperCore | Scoop.it

This map is a graphical representation of the Dashboard’s available data on foreign assistance appropriations by fiscal year. The darker a country’s shading appears on the map, the more funding that U.S. Government country office received in that fiscal year. Users can switch between fiscal years by using the dropdown box in the top right corner of the page. Users can choose a country by clicking the map or by selecting the name of the country from the drop down box above.


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A clever way to estimate enormous numbers - Michael Mitchell

View the full lesson here: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/michael-mitchell-a-clever-way-to-estimate-enormous-numbers Have you ever tried to guess how many pieces ...

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Why the First Laptop Had Such a Hard Time Catching On (Hint: Sexism)

Why the First Laptop Had Such a Hard Time Catching On (Hint: Sexism) | SuperCore | Scoop.it

It wasn't just a high price that kept businessmen away from early portable computers.

 

Early on most men were adamantly opposed to purchasing a device for themselves that had a keyboard.  Throughout the 1950's 60's and 70's, keyboards and typewriters were seen as secretarial work.

 

Questions to ponder: How have American gender norms changed since then?  Why have they changed?  


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The New World

The New World | SuperCore | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.

 

This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.

 

Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.


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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 23, 2012 9:36 PM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 8:53 AM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 11:12 AM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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» Untreated Concussions May Lead to Mental Disorders for Some Teens - Psych Central News

» Untreated Concussions May Lead to Mental Disorders for Some Teens - Psych Central News | SuperCore | Scoop.it
Teens who hit their heads while participating in sports such as football, horseback riding, cheerleading or gymnastics, are at risk of suffering concussions — (An untreated concussion can be dangerous for your teen, better yet they are preventable.)...

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Global News Roundup: Amazon Deforestation on the Rise Again in Brazil

Global News Roundup: Amazon Deforestation on the Rise Again in Brazil | SuperCore | Scoop.it

Amazon deforestation on the rise again in Brazil Deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon accelerated in June, with more than 300 square kilometers destroyed, a 17 percent increase over the previous month, government researchers said Tuesday.


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The 9/11 Dilemma: Freedom vs. Security

KH: How has America changed since the attacks of September 11, 2001? We are still struggling to find a balance between saftey and civil liberties. The Patriot Act, prisoners in Guantanamo Bay, interrorgation techniques have all become parts of our lives.

The article asks the questions...

• Can the government listen to our phone conversations and read our  e-mails without warrants?

• Should suspected terrorists at the Guantánamo prison in Cuba have the right to challenge their detention in court?

• How much power does the president have to search for and punish those accused of having terrorist ties?

• Are harsh interrogation techniques ever justified? And at what point do they become torture?

 

Do you remember a time when you could board a plane with friends or family seeing you off from the gate? Do you remember bringing liquids though security? The youth of this country do not.  For more resources on September 11th, see: http://www.scoop.it/t/national-september-11-memorial-the-world


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Presidential Campaign Posters: 200 Years of Election Art

Presidential Campaign Posters: 200 Years of Election Art | SuperCore | Scoop.it
A brief visual history of political propaganda design.

 

Now this is filled with great images that are perfect for classroom use today to understand the past. 


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