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New Skin Patch Warns People When It’s Time to Get Out of the Sun

New Skin Patch Warns People When It’s Time to Get Out of the Sun | Sunscreen | Scoop.it

By the time most of us realize we’ve been out in the sun too long, it’s too late. It can take up to 24 hours after exposure before you realize you have a sunburn.

 

Now, a Michigan Technological University Senior Design team has devised a sensor that tells you when it’s time to seek shelter, long before your skin gets red and tender.

 

The biomedical engineering seniors developed a skin patch imprinted with a graphic—in this case, a happy face design. The nickel-size patch gradually darkens under ultraviolet light, the type of light that causes sunburn and skin cancer.  When you can’t see the happy face anymore, it’s time to get out of the sun.

 

Not everyone burns at the same rate, and the team took that into account. “We calibrated it based on skin type,” said team member Anne François. Their prototypes were made for the three skin types that are most susceptible to sunburn.

 

The patch is made with UV-sensitive film bonded to a special tape with medical-grade adhesive that can withstand plenty of trips into the swimming pool. Because it measures total UV exposure, it “knows” when a user applies sunscreen or goes in the shade and darkens more slowly.

The team has filed a provisional patent on their invention and received Best Overall Award in the  Invention Disclosure Competition at Michigan Tech’s 2013 Undergraduate Expo. If it makes it to market, it would be inexpensive: the prototypes cost only 13 cents apiece in materials.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The New Rules for Sunscreen - New York Times (blog)

Christian Science Monitor
The New Rules for Sunscreen
New York Times (blog)
There is no question most skin cancers are related to sun exposure, yet even with sunscreen sales approaching $1 billion a year, skin cancer rates continue to climb.
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When Did Sunscreen Get So Complicated? - Slate Magazine

When Did Sunscreen Get So Complicated? - Slate Magazine | Sunscreen | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
When Did Sunscreen Get So Complicated?
Slate Magazine
Summer is almost here, which means it's time for picnics, pool parties, and every parent's favorite pastime: chase-after-your-kid-with-the-sunscreen-bottle.
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Consumer Reports: Don't get burned by sunscreen brands - News Sentinel

Consumer Reports: Don't get burned by sunscreen brands - News Sentinel | Sunscreen | Scoop.it
Consumer Reports: Don't get burned by sunscreen brands News Sentinel In Consumer Reports' latest Ratings of sunscreens, Up & Up (Target) Continuous Spray Sport SPF 50 and Equate (Wal-Mart) Ultra Protection Lotion SPF 50 earned the highest scores in...
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9 Sunscreens To Protect You From Head To Toe

9 Sunscreens To Protect You From Head To Toe | Sunscreen | Scoop.it
Once summer rolls around, we find it pretty hard to stay indoors, unless the heat and humidity is too unbearable. But with all that time spent outside, one thing we can't afford to skip is sunscreen.
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8 Sunscreen Mistakes You're Probably Making

8 Sunscreen Mistakes You're Probably Making | Sunscreen | Scoop.it
The first sunscreen mistake is not wearing any. By now, we all know spending too much time in the sun can increase risk for both skin cancer (the most common of all cancers) and premature skin aging.
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Daily sunscreen can slow skin aging, study finds - Today.com

Daily sunscreen can slow skin aging, study finds - Today.com | Sunscreen | Scoop.it
Jagran Post Daily sunscreen can slow skin aging, study finds Today.com Australian researchers found that when adults regularly used broad spectrum sunscreen - which protects against both ultraviolet B and ultraviolet A rays -- they were less likely...
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