Summer Reading
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Richard Allington on Doing Right by Struggling Readers

Richard Allington on Doing Right by Struggling Readers | Summer Reading | Scoop.it
Richard Allington on Doing Right by Struggling Readers “The good news is that we now have an essential research base demonstrating that virtually every child… (Richard Allington on Doing Right by Struggling Readers

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Summer Reading and the Rich/Poor Achievement Gap | An Educator Responds to Questions | School Library Journal

Summer Reading and the Rich/Poor Achievement Gap | An Educator Responds to Questions | School Library Journal | Summer Reading | Scoop.it

Schools sending students off on summer vacation and public libraries gearing up to get kids excited about summer reading programs are both in the business of making sure children become fluent, engaged readers. Unfortunately, the results of those efforts aren’t necessarily equal for kids in lower-income situations. Richard L. Allington, co-author of Summer Reading: Closing the Rich/Poor Achievement Gap (Teachers College and International Reading Association, 2013) talks about the reasons for that disparity and offers research-based suggestions for solving the problem, with particular ideas for librarians.


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Pam Colburn Harland's curator insight, June 4, 2013 5:14 PM

 I want to join the librarians "who don't give a hoot about lost books" round table. In fact, lately I've been celebrating lost books thinking "they like the books I picked out so much, they are stealing them!"

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13 Ideas To Slow Summer Reading Loss - TeachThought

13 Ideas To Slow Summer Reading Loss - TeachThought | Summer Reading | Scoop.it

"Summer break is almost here. Your child probably has a countdown posted on the refrigerator or hidden in their notebook.

 

During the past school year, your child’s school has supported and encouraged independent reading to build your child’s fluency, vocabulary, and enjoyment for reading. And, you’ve likely done the same thing at home.

 

With summer approaching, it’s the perfect time to think about how to support your child’s independent reading through the hot weeks ahead.

 

In this post, I’ll share a few facts about summer reading loss, and 13 ideas for how parents can support and encourage reading during  summer vacation (and stop the summer reading slide)"


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Avoid the Summer Slide With These Fun Summer Reading Ideas | Scholastic.com

Avoid the Summer Slide With These Fun Summer Reading Ideas | Scholastic.com | Summer Reading | Scoop.it
Get ready for summer with ready-made activities that coordinate nine favorite different novels with interactive websites.

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Top Ten Tips for Reading Aloud by Matt Renwick

Top Ten Tips for Reading Aloud by Matt Renwick | Summer Reading | Scoop.it

1. Schedule It Reading aloud shouldn’t be left to that few minutes before lunch. Richard Allington, in his ASCD article Every Child, Every Day, states that students should listen to a fluent adult ...


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Resources to Prevent Summer Slide: Virtual Field Trips, DIY Projects and Summer Reading

Resources to Prevent Summer Slide: Virtual Field Trips, DIY Projects and Summer Reading | Summer Reading | Scoop.it
Summer is here! But along with warmer weather, trips to the pool and the Fourth of July, comes a not-so-fun reality... the summer slide.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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The Millions : The Problem With Summer Reading

The Millions : The Problem With Summer Reading | Summer Reading | Scoop.it

"Summer reading assignments and reading quizzes and book reports don’t teach our students how to be readers. They teach them that reading is a school-centered activity. That it is a chore. That they aren’t good at it if they can’t remember insignificant plot points. These assignments set students up to cheat, or to fail, and always to regard reading as a drag."


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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, August 2, 2013 2:36 PM

Sometimes I try to create a virtual Venn Diagram showing the intersection between what it is that I love about reading great literature and what it is that we do as literary educators to encourage life-long reading and to measure our success in creating life-long readers.

 

I don't do this often as it can be a bit depressing. 

 

And sometimes, I wonder what would happen if some sort of "Opinion-Amnesia" happened in English Departments. What if every colleague at the department meetings, whether they had previously held opinions about what was worth teaching and how to effectively teach literature that had been in alignment with my own previously held opinions or not, had to suddenly start over and somehow rebuild and replace their ideas and beliefs regarding best practice in literary reading education?

 

I have no doubt that the vast majority of Literary Reading educators, whether their sense of best practice mirrored my own or was vastly different from my own are well-intended and dedicated to doing what they have come to believe is best for their students.

 

I also have no doubt that as my style and practice was incredibly effective for many of my students, that it at the same time not incredibly effective for other students who found my colleagues with very different styles and practices than my own to be much more effective.

 

So where might a well-intended English Department begin the process of rediscovering a personal opinion set of best practice?

 

What would be the essential question that would lead to refreshing a skill-set for effective literary reading education.

 

There would probably be a fairly universal agreement that learning HOW to read would be a universal goal. But, agreeing upon the best practice for for HOW to teach HOW to read would quickly become a matter for revisiting the many reasons behind decisions to be made on HOW to teach HOW to read.

 

And, given the premise that we would all be suffering from "Opinion-Abnesia" it wouldn't be possible to simply haul out our previous opinions on the matter. We'd actually have to revisit that essential question and revisit our reasoning behind our opinions.

 

After the essential questions associated with how to teach how to read. I'd jump right to what I think is at least an equally important essential question? WHY do we teach literary reading? Do we really believe that Shakespeare is essential? (And, I LOVE SHAKESPEARE) If Shakespeare is essential, why? And, are we satisfied with the success rate we have when teaching Shakespeare? 

 

Is our goal to create life-long readers or the next generation of English majors? 

 

If we asked everyone of our students what they thought the essential values of literary reading are, would they respond in sufficient numbers in ways we would hope to hear.

 

Well, I'm going on and on about ideas that are at the core of building an effective literary reading program. And, of course the ideas are far too important to dismiss as either easily dismissable or easily agreeable.

 

But, one last thought about this article's position on Summer Reading...

 

Is it possible to draw conclusions about summer reading? If we are truly advocates of life-long reading as a goal, then in a sense the question is ludicrous. Of course students should be reading during the summer. The question is really in the design of the integration of summer reading into literary reading educational practice. And, I'd suggest that if the design is misguided that summer reading may be responsible for killing any interest in reading among those students who haven't yet discovered sufficient reason to be literary readers beyond avoiding the hassles of passing tests.

 

And by the way, I'm not opposed to having to demonstrate that reading has been done but if passing the test trumps or drowns actually developing an engaged perception of the true value of literary reading as a life-long practice, then as well-intended as we may be, we may be inadvertently contributing to the misconception that hitting the bull's eye on the test is more important than discovering how to hit bulls' eyes in life's great challenges.

 

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~