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Early Childhood Development Program Leads to Success in School for Students | The READY! for Kindergarten Website

Early Childhood Development Program Leads to Success in School for Students | The READY! for Kindergarten Website | Success & Learning | Scoop.it
School districts, community foundations and local community organizations sponsor and fund READY! for Kindergarten programs all across the United States and Canada to ensure children success in school.

Via Dee Andrews
Breland Green's insight:

This article talks about how there is a need for early childhood learning, since the crucial stage of the human mind is very early in life. The article also says that programs for children to use during that crucial stage are what make the child successful later in his or her life.

 

In this article, it is said that children must be surrounded by aspects of their lives socially as well as academically. This correlates to the earlier article because it brings forth the idea of a growth mindset. A child will not likely thrive later in life if he or she is not willing to meet new people and explore new ideas early in life. 

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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:28 PM

The most important factor in school success is readiness for kindergarten.  This site offers rich resources to parents and teachers who want to provide developmentally appropriate interactions designed to enhance a child's communication, literacy and numeracy skills.--Lou

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White papers are a modern success story in business marketing

White papers are a modern success story in business marketing | Success & Learning | Scoop.it
White papers are a modern success story in business marketing (White papers are a modern success story in business marketing http://t.co/lS1rvvLiqI)...
Breland Green's insight:

This article talks about the success of a person as being determined by the knowledge that they have of technology. 

 

Technology must be learned by active learning, so the article says that the most successful people are the most proactive.

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Rescooped by Breland Green from eLearning Industry
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Top 10 e-Learning Statistics for 2014 You Need To Know

Top 10 e-Learning Statistics for 2014 You Need To Know | Success & Learning | Scoop.it

THis The rise in e-Learning's popularity isn't showing any signs of slowing. In fact, judging by the following Top 10 eLearning statistics for 2014 article and infographic, the future of the e-Learning Industry is brighter than ever.


Via Christopher Pappas
Breland Green's insight:

This article talks about eLearning, or "online classes" that college students take in order to save some time in classes. The article says that many people leave their jobs simply because of the fact that they haven't received well enough education before the job, and eLearning is trying to help fix that.

 

The article speaks of only people who are willing to learn and willing to spend time on an online class in order to be successful. 

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Christopher Pappas's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:34 AM

e-Learning has revolutionized the educational sector, and has changed the way we look at knowledge and skill acquisition altogether. Thanks to modern educational technology, e-Learning tools and techniques just keep getting bigger and better. Today, they are providing learners with a more impressive, and more effective, educational experience. 

Zian Peak's curator insight, April 10, 2014 5:52 AM

Shows what a great impact e learning can have to a buisness.

Rescooped by Breland Green from It All Begins in Your Mind
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Stress Relief Can Be the Key to Success in School: Scientific American

Stress Relief Can Be the Key to Success in School: Scientific American | Success & Learning | Scoop.it
Stress may be silently sabotaging success in school.

 

Stress can be toxic at any age. It rattles us when it strikes, shaking up our relationships and narrowing our focus. When it becomes chronic, it ravages our health. Physically, emotionally and intellectually, stress can drag us down.


Via Don L. Price
Breland Green's insight:

This article says that stress can diminish the learning process in people of all ages. It says that stress will cause you to be less likely to succeed. 

 

This article shows stress as being a factor of a fixed mindset. Stress creates heavy thoughts on certain topics and not as much thought into learning what is necessary to succeed. Therefore, this article says that success is about learning in the way that the person learns to overcome stress, and not in the way that the person simply "appears" to be "smart."

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Learning to Say "No" Is Part of Success

Learning to Say "No" Is Part of Success | Success & Learning | Scoop.it
You've gotten ahead by saying "yes." But now that you've got momentum, it's time to prioritize.
Breland Green's insight:

This article talks about how people have to learn how to say "no" in order to be successful. It says that often times people think that they have to yes in order to be successful, but the article says that people need to slow down and understand what they are doing before they accept and opportunity. It also says that people accept opportunities because of the fact that they're challenging and want to learn.

 

The article says that there is a flaw with wanting to always learn. It says that wanting to learn means sometimes accepting opportunities that you are not not necessarily mentally ready to accomplish. It says to not necessarily have a fixed mindset, but to think before you want to learn extensively. 

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Rescooped by Breland Green from Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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No Rich Child Left Behind: make way for another achievement gap based on Socio-economic status

No Rich Child Left Behind: make way for another achievement gap based on Socio-economic status | Success & Learning | Scoop.it
Family income is now a better predictor of children’s success in school than race.

Via Lou Salza
Breland Green's insight:

This article talks about success being determined by how wealthy your family is. The article compares SAT statistics and even extracurricular statistics saying that people who come from wealthier families are in better shape to become successful later in their lives. 

 

The article suggests that children who come from rich families will be more likely to have a mindset for learning and will be pushed more to be involved in lots of things inside of and outside of school. The article says that people who are in poverty are not necessarily in a fixed mindset, but are in a situation in which they cannot easily afford to learn. 

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Lou Salza's curator insight, April 28, 2013 12:21 PM

Achievement gaps are growing between Afro-American, Hispanic, and Caucasian children. An achievment gap persists between learners with LD and general education students. Now clear evidence that family income predicts a greater acheivement gap that race.

 

What has happened to us as a nation that we would permit these patterns to establish themselves? And what does it portend for the future of the nation's economy and for the quality of our communities?--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...consider two children, one from a family with income of $165,000 and one from a family with income of $15,000. These incomes are at the 90th and 10th percentiles of the income distribution nationally, meaning that 10 percent of children today grow up in families with incomes below $15,000 and 10 percent grow up in families with incomes above $165,000.

In the 1980s, on an 800-point SAT-type test scale, the average difference in test scores between two such children would have been about 90 points; today it is 125 points. This is almost twice as large as the 70-point test score gap between white and black children. Family income is now a better predictor of children’s success in school than race.

The same pattern is evident in other, more tangible, measures of educational success, like college completion. In a study similar to mine, Martha J. Bailey and Susan M. Dynarski, economists at the University of Michigan, found that the proportion of students from upper-income families who earn a bachelor’s degree has increased by 18 percentage points over a 20-year period, while the completion rate of poor students has grown by only 4 points..."

Rescooped by Breland Green from Early Learning Ensures Success
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Early Childhood Development Program Leads to Success in School for Students | The READY! for Kindergarten Website

Early Childhood Development Program Leads to Success in School for Students | The READY! for Kindergarten Website | Success & Learning | Scoop.it
School districts, community foundations and local community organizations sponsor and fund READY! for Kindergarten programs all across the United States and Canada to ensure children success in school.

Via Dee Andrews
Breland Green's insight:

This article talks about how there is a need for early childhood learning, since the crucial stage of the human mind is very early in life. The article also says that programs for children to use during that crucial stage are what make the child successful later in his or her life.

 

In this article, it is said that children must be surrounded by aspects of their lives socially as well as academically. This correlates to the earlier article because it brings forth the idea of a growth mindset. A child will not likely thrive later in life if he or she is not willing to meet new people and explore new ideas early in life. 

more...
Lou Salza's curator insight, March 6, 2014 3:28 PM

The most important factor in school success is readiness for kindergarten.  This site offers rich resources to parents and teachers who want to provide developmentally appropriate interactions designed to enhance a child's communication, literacy and numeracy skills.--Lou