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Suburban Land Trusts
Conserving land in older, "inner" suburbs for small parks, gardens, natural areas & stormwater management
Curated by Bhopkins
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Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | Suburban Land Trusts | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...


Via Lauren Moss
Bhopkins's insight:

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."

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The Global Population in 2100

The Global Population in 2100 | Suburban Land Trusts | Scoop.it
Solving many of the world’s biggest environmental challenges may have just gotten more difficult.

The Department of Economic and Social Affairs of the UN recently released population data indicating the midline estimate - more than 10.8 billion by 2100 - is 800 million higher than the 2010 prediction.

Today’s rural-to-urban migration will continue in full force, with upwards of 84% of the planet living in cities at the close of the century (compared to 52 % today).

Of course population isn’t the only factor contributing to humans’ planetary impact. Consumption may be equally important when looking at the drivers of environmental change across the Earth. Nevertheless, population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...


Via Lauren Moss
Bhopkins's insight:

population will continue to be a major consideration as we work to address issues ranging from energy and food security to water availability, species loss, pollution, urban planning and more in the decades ahead...

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Lili Dávila's curator insight, September 23, 2013 6:52 PM

Great infographic, but a pretty scary prediction.

Aleasha Reed's curator insight, September 27, 2013 9:14 AM

By the year 2100 our global population is calculated to reach 10.8 billion. The United States is expected to grow another 150 million by this time. Our population right now is 313.9 million right now. Our big cities will continue to grow, and new ones will arise as the years pass.

M-Christine Lanne's curator insight, November 11, 2013 2:44 AM

La démographie, une donnée déterminante  pour l'évolution du climat et la pression sur les ressources naturelles. Nous finissons hélas par être trop nombreux sur terre pour ce qu'elle peut supporter au rythme actuel...