Suburban Land Trusts
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Suburban Land Trusts
Conserving land in older, "inner" suburbs for small parks, gardens, natural areas & stormwater management
Curated by Bhopkins
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How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion

How Much Space Do Cars Take? Cyclists Demonstrate How Bicycles Fight Congestion | Suburban Land Trusts | Scoop.it

People that commute by car spend an inordinate amount of time staring at taillights. There’s no way they’re getting around that traffic in front of them. But what about bike commuters? This group of Latvian cyclists recently created a powerful demonstration of the large footprint created by cars that carry just one occupant.

 

The four cyclists strapped on fragile frameworks shaped like cars, then hopped into the local traffic in Riga to show how much room they would occupy on their daily commute. The difference communicates loud and clear: if these cyclists were actually in cars, they would seriously add to congestion.


Via Lauren Moss, Wes Thomas
Bhopkins's insight:

This group of Latvian cyclists recently created a powerful demonstration of the large footprint created by cars that carry just one occupant.
Read more at http://www.visualnews.com/2014/10/11/much-space-cars-take-cyclists-demonstrate-bicycles-fight-congestion/#jV0A55HTvzPI4Lic.99

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, October 17, 2014 12:23 PM

Interesting study from Latvia.  Something to think about when fossil fuels  run out or become too expensive to buy. Protection from bad weather is a definite plus for cars.  Or, you could have commuters park their cars in a municipal lot and use bikes to reach their workplaces once they enter the city.  Aloha, Russ.

Jim Gramata's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:49 AM

Visually compelling look at the power of the bike commute 

Agence Relations d'Utilité Publique's curator insight, November 24, 2014 5:06 AM

Les images parlent d'elles même...

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The 10 Most Bike-Friendly Cities in the U.S.

The 10 Most Bike-Friendly Cities in the U.S. | Suburban Land Trusts | Scoop.it
Based on the number of bike facilities per square mile, San Francisco is the best city for bikers in the United States.


According to new data, the city has 5.6 bike-able miles per square mile, including on-street bike lanes, multi-use bike paths and signed bike routes. Residents of Austin, Texas, Long Beach, Calif., and Philadelphia rank right below San Francisco.

This annotated map of the U.S., made by Statista, shows the 10 cities in the U.S. with the most bike facilities per square mile, according to data from the Alliance for Biking and Walking.


Via Lauren Moss
Bhopkins's insight:

10 cities with the most bike facilities per square mile - Baltimore is not on the list.

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Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City

Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute Map How Our Brains Navigate the City | Suburban Land Trusts | Scoop.it
The GSAPP’s Cloud Lab teams up with neurologists and the design institute to track how urban environments can make people relaxed or tense.

This spring, the Cloud Lab at Columbia University and the Van Alen Institute tackled the challenge of assessing and mapping how people respond to their environment as a part of Van Alen’s Elsewhere series on wellness in the city.

Instead of the typical focus groups, however, the researchers tracked brainwaves to gauge the mental activities of nearly 100 volunteers; using electroencephalography-based (EEG) measurements and the GPS tracking app, the research team collected more than 1 gigabyte of data over 200 walking sessions that, in theory, create a snapshot of a day-in-the-life of the neighborhood’s mental states. 

Presenting the data in a manner that retained its spatial qualities required the researchers to develop their own software for visualization. At a public follow-up presentation in May, the team presented the simplified data on a 3D map of DUMBO. Areas in cyan indicate places in which participants were in a more meditative and relaxed state, while areas in red indicate places where participants had a more focused or heightened sense of awareness...


Via Lauren Moss
Bhopkins's insight:

"Architects and planners could employ the technology during post-occupancy walkthroughs or preliminary design presentations."

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