Subtraction With Regrouping
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Math Model: Subtract two 2-digit numbers with regrouping

Samantha Hines's insight:

This online interactive activity from Harcourt School lets students see the process of subtraction with regrouping step by step. This website shows students a problem, and then as you press ‘next’, the sentence on the page changes and asks questions, gives directions, or explains reasons for the next step. A workmat is also provided with tens and ones blocks as well as a tens and ones chart. Showing this concept in both ways allows different kinds of learners to benefit. The illustrations and drawings really help to show each step of the way. Along with pressing ‘next’, you can also press ‘back’ if you do not understand a step or need to see it again. There is a math glossary that defines ‘ones’, ‘tens’, ‘subtract’, ‘difference’, and ‘regroup’. I think that this website really makes math accessible, because it can be utilized in so many different ways. Students can use this independently at home, or at school on the computers. It also allows teachers to provide their students with instruction in different ways, if a student is not grasping oral directions. This website could also be great for students who are Deaf or hard of hearing because they would be able to see this process at their own pace explained in two different ways that they can read visually as many times as needed.  

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Grade 2: Two-Digit Subtraction With Regrouping: When Students Ask

Samantha Hines's insight:

This is a really unique resource from Houghton Mifflin that gives teachers strategies on how to answer common questions from students when it comes to two-digit subtraction with regrouping. These questions are ones that teachers should be prepared for; as regrouping when subtracting can be a really difficult concept to grasp (it was for me!) These questions are: “Will I always regroup when I subtract?” “How can I subtract two-digit numbers correctly?” “Is regrouping for subtraction different from regrouping for addition” “Why do I need to know this?” and “Why should I know how to estimate a difference?” Good teachers always prepare for common misconceptions that might come up in a lesson, and this gives teachers strategies on how to answer these common questions effectively. The most intriguing question that I found and one that relates to our learning this semester is “Why do I need to know this?” By providing meaningful activities and showing (not just telling) students that they will be using subtraction all throughout their lives, students will see the importance of learning this skill and will be able to apply it to other contexts as well, which will only deepen their understanding. 

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Laura Jane's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:14 AM

As Sam already mentioned, this Houghton Mifflin resource is brilliant. It predicts questions that students will have about regrouping, and provides teacher resources for how to combat these questions. As I've stated previously, I often find it hard to "un-learn" concepts, yet this is critical in helping students to better understand a topic. Being able to teach them on their level is critical.

 

I would use this resource alongside Dr. Bote's "questioning strategies" resource in order to get the most out of my teaching. Thinking about the questions that we ask is paramount in generating effective lessons.

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StudyJams

Samantha Hines's insight:

 This is another great online resource from Scholastic. While this link focuses on subtraction with regrouping, there are several other math topics provided on the website as well. Students can learn about key vocabulary (difference, regrouping) and also see related ‘jam’s as well, like how to relate addition and subtraction, addition and subtraction without regrouping, and how to estimate sums and differences of whole numbers. The step-by-step feature puts subtraction problems into real-world contexts (trick or treating and pieces of candy, for example) and then lets students click on each step to move through the problem. There is a voice who narrates and guides the students through each step. The ‘watch out!’ feature gives students more support if they’re stuck on a certain step. The ‘try it!’ feature lets students practice subtraction problems on their own to test themselves. This is a great way to encourage messy learning and trial and error. Once students are done exploring the tutorials and activities, they can click on ‘test yourself’ on the home page and take a mini quiz. Students can then see the amount they got correct and review their answers, which lets them assess their own learning and highlight where they need more help. 

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Subtraction-with-Regrouping-Article1.pdf

Samantha Hines's insight:

This .pdf gives teachers great strategies to help their students overcome the obstacle of subtracting with regrouping. While students need their own resources to help them, teachers do as well. This file lists and explains things that teachers should focus on and how to make the concepts more accessible and meaningful for their students. These strategies can help students build conceptual understanding of subtracting and mastery of the skills involved so that they can be applied to other contexts. Something I particularly like about these tips is that they can be useful for any grade - I think that sometimes, getting back to the basics can be more beneficial for older students who may feel the pressure of higher expectations. I also think that the first tip is really important: start with number sense. By starting with what subtraction means (introducing concepts like separate, whole-part-whole, and compare) students can get a baseline understanding of how to apply these concepts to subtraction problems. This will also benefit them later when they learn about more complex subtraction, like how to subtract fractions. Fact families are a great way to get students to see the relation between subtraction and addition. The students in my classroom loved working with these, and are still applying the skills they learned from fact families to other topics. I also agree with the statement, “Money is motivating”. Money is a great way to connect math concepts to meaningful, real-life situations. Money also lends itself to many possibilities when talking about subtraction with regrouping. 

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Alexis's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:48 PM

I absolutely love these strategies for teaching subtraction with regrouping! I really enforced these with my students as we worked on subtraction with regrouping in our student impact project group. I love the reinforce place value concepts. In order to regroup, students need to have this basic understanding of place value. So many great tips for teaching subtraction with regrouping that I will definitely use (especially have students "become" a math problem). I love that this article sums up the tips and gives examples. I would love to read the actual, full article.

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BrainPOP Jr. | Math | Learn about Subtracting With Regrouping

Provides educational movies for K-3 students. Homework Help, leveled quizzes, games and activities for kids. Exceptional resource for teachers and homeschools.
Samantha Hines's insight:

My mentor and I have used BrainPop videos many times in our classroom before, and the students love it. They are really familiar with the characters in the videos and how the website works, which would encourage them to view this video as valuable as well. This video about subtraction with regrouping puts the concept into real world problems: playing a board game and losing points, selling tickets, a store selling robot toys, etc. Because the video introduces the concept in many different contexts, great discussion could be facilitated because students are presented with various ways to access the information. This video explains how to trade ones cubes for a tens block and vice versa, and also shows the blocks moving around to help students visualize this concept of trading. This is beneficial because students can then model this and go and practice with tens blocks on their own, or teachers can refer back to this video when modeling how to use tens blocks. The video also explains why you have to regroup, which I think is a missing part of many lessons on subtraction with regrouping. The narration walks students through each step of the process (several times in different contexts) by drawing on the equation and talking through every part. Therefore, it could be used for independent computer time before releasing them to another online task. If a teacher was using this with the whole class, they could pause the video at certain times to discuss and focus on where students are really having trouble. Lastly, the part of the video that I think makes it stand apart from other online resources is the section at the end where it talks about using addition to check your answer. This is a great extension and allows students to conceptualize subtraction in a different way. They can see how addition and subtraction relate while also learning a strategy to double-check their work. 

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Laura Jane's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:22 PM

I have heard a lot of praise for BrainPOP, but it isn't a resource that my mentor teacher utilizes. This video shows subtraction in a real world context: losing points in a board game, selling tickets, a store selling toys, etc. By making these connections to things that students of this generation have actually encountered, it makes the math more meaningful and significant.

 

Teachers frequently teach the algorithm for a math skill, without explaining WHY it makes sense. This video also uses virtual manipulatives to model regrouping for students. This aspect makes the video very versatile... It could be shown to the whole group, or it could be used for independent computer work in small math rotation groups. 

Alexis's curator insight, December 15, 2013 11:43 PM

I have heard great things about Brain Pop. I think that my students would really enjoy this and it gives them a break from regular math lessons. They can play games, take quizzes, and more while exercising thier brains and practicing math (specifically subtraction with regrouping).