Subjective well-being
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Not a bad idea, eh?

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What Happy People Do Differently

What Happy People Do Differently | Subjective well-being | Scoop.it
One of life's sharpest paradoxes is that the key to satisfaction is doing things that feel risky, uncomfortable, and occasionally bad.
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For Kashdan, of course, it's curiosity. For me, it's more about participation.

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Preventing Alzheimer’s disease-related gray matter atrophy by B-vitamin treatment

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This plus meditation *could* be pretty powerful! combination!

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Assessment 101: Common Types of Assessment

Assessment 101: Common Types of Assessment | Subjective well-being | Scoop.it
In this issue of the Special Ed Advocate you will find part 2 our series, Assessment 101. Dr. Aida Khan describes the most common types of assessment and who does them.
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Good information in "earth language"

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How to create an effective content curation plan

How to create an effective content curation plan | Subjective well-being | Scoop.it

"once you start gathering content to share, you begin to realize it’s a bit more complicated than you thought. It takes a bit of focus and creativity to find good content and then organise it."


Via Guillaume Decugis
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Neil Ferree's curator insight, March 2, 2013 4:20 PM

A good Read on what you need to know before you launch your 2013 Content Marketing strategy. You can see the Top 5 CM Planning Guides by Click Here or just Google DiY Conent Marketing

Martin (Marty) Smith's curator insight, March 5, 2013 7:50 PM

Backing Into Great Content Curation Greatness
Since the goal of every Internet marketing team should be creating a sustainable system of content marketing with an ever increasing return let's agree on a few important curation ideas: 

* Curation creates more reach faster than creation.

* Creation is still important, > than 20% is risky. 
* Curation is never random, strongest clearly themed.

* Scale means you do more with less, so scale = ROI.

* Real time is where the HEAT of content curation lives.

* The more you curate the better at it you become.

 

The second bullet is ironic. Even gurus I LOVE tire me out when they don't pick up other people's threads or react to mine. "Tire me out" is another way of saying I leave and reduce advocacy. 

This means EVEN if you have resources needed to create 90% and only curate 10% I would NEVER suggest that as a winning strategy. Create more than 20% and you risk "talking to yourself about yourself". I've come to the conclusion that the optimal ratio is 90% curation to 10% creation, but Argyle Social did a somewhat related study that came down 50% creation (promotion of your own stuff) and 50% curation. 

I think promotion is different than either curation or creation, so let's put that study aside for the moment.  

1. Define Your Curation THEME
Note that I use the singular "theme". Any beginning content plan should focus on ONE meme; one idea set, and devote all energy to that single theme. Don't go too broad either. Not Internet Marketing, but Internet Marketing / Email Marketing (if you are @Bronto) or Internet Marketing / New Ecom (if you are @Atlanticbt my employer). 

2. Research Your Theme's Ecosystem - Picking Gurus 
Who are the gurus of your theme? How social are these gurus? Do they respond when use @GURU? Pick a mix bag of 5 gurus to follow with 3 in the "approachable" camp and 2 in the uber-guru camp (pick the two with either the biggest following or that are most aligned to your thinking or both). 

 

3. Create A Content Map For Your Theme

Use the 10% creation and 90% curation rule to guide what kind of content you create and put where. Creation is best on OWNED properties. Curation moves easily between OWNED and SHARED (social nets). Don't only do ONE or the other tactic exclusively on one platform. Mix it up. Create short blog posts that are hybrid curation. Create themed Tweets that are almost like a blog post in 20 tweets. Others would tell you to use a blog to do X and a tweet to do Y. I disagree, surprise and serendipity keeps your content marketing alive. 

4. Create A Schedule, Stick To It
Leave 20% of your plan for "response", but do create s publishable schedule of daily, weekly or monthly features. Schedules = TRUST and you can never have enough trust. If you miss a scheduled date explain why and, "Dog ate my homework," is not a good excuse. 

5. Schedule Reviews & Summary Presentations
Watch 5 Key Performance indicators every single day of the MACRO (traffic) and MICRO (forms completed by Google visitors on keyword X) variety. Schedule a quarterly review with senior management since that too creates trust and makes you SMARTER due to the preparation and questions you will need to answer. 

6. Practice, Practice and Practice More
How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, Practice, Practice. The old cliché is true. Yes it will take getting used to the idea your "practice" is seen by OTHERS, but get used to it. I use Scoop.it as my practice field. I allow for a higher degree of errors (WHEN is Scoop.it going to add spell check for God's sake :) and stumbles because Scoop.it is about FEEDBACK and SPEED in our ecosystem. 

When something looks PRIME TIME on Scoop.it I tighten down the bolts (i.e. hire my great editor) and increase the investment. I move a longer and more keyword dense take to our owned properties such as our blog or website.


Our process doesn't have to be yours since there are infinite variations on the curation theme. The important idea is to curate a LOT of content daily, define a platform that is your "practice field" and always increase the speed of curation while reducing errors and increasing shares (what you are curating for).  


BTW, learned these tips from GREAT curators such as @RobinGood and @maxOz and others I listed on Google Plus: 

https://plus.google.com/u/0/102639884404823294558/posts/MzpAzkLAFfx 


Link is to an excellent Guillaume post linked to another great curation post. 

Maddog Social Media's comment, March 6, 2013 12:34 PM
Martin, thank you so much!
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Latest Parenting Trend: The CTFD Method

Latest Parenting Trend: The CTFD Method | Subjective well-being | Scoop.it
Yes, using the CTFD method, you'll find the pressure lifted and realize your child loves you no matter what, even if they've yet to master the alphabet.
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Somewhat lighthearted, there's a lot of truth to this.

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5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online

5 (less traditional) ways to create and share knowledge online | Subjective well-being | Scoop.it

The communication of knowledge and ideas is intrinsic to the human condition. Our earliest ancestors had a rich oral tradition, through which they passed on what they knew about the world, often across great distances.

 

Today, the avenues available to our quest to gain and share knowledge are boundless, but I’d like to share with you five of my own personal favorites.


Via Guillaume Decugis
John Burik's insight:

Sharing knowledge is a way to increase happiness for many of us. At the same time it's a good idea to consider how much information we are sharing in which particular context. As we've recently learned even searching for information can have its cost in the amount of personal information we are sharing. While google has been my first choice for many years I'll likely be using http://duckduckgo.com much more frequently.

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Andrea Norwood's comment, June 24, 2013 11:00 AM
I love it when others share information with me, whether it be business, political, in which I am not all that much into, but it still helps to know what's happening in the world of politics, or whether it be history of old or new, knowledge is the key to life and especially education.
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Private traits and attributes are predictable from digital records of human behavior

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Which brain regions enable us to remember our past and anticipate our future? | Science & Consciousness Review

Which brain regions enable us to remember our past and anticipate our future? | Science & Consciousness Review | Subjective well-being | Scoop.it
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Important for the existence of a "subject" in subjective well-being.

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