Stuff I Found Intriguing
1.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Stuff I Found Intriguing
Websites that contain unique and imaginative content that I personally find useful and/or fascinating
Curated by John Jung
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Trending: In A Time Of Uncertainty, A Divided Nation Searches For Puppies

Trending: In A Time Of Uncertainty, A Divided Nation Searches For Puppies | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Flummadiddle, Puppy was in the news on Dec 2, 2016. So many puppies. Find out more >
John Jung's insight:
A charming change of pace from the political rhetoric that runs rampart these days.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Got plain language? 5 tips for clear, engaging writing — even in research  

Got plain language? 5 tips for clear, engaging writing — even in research   | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Got plain language? 5 tips for clear, engaging writing — even in research.
John Jung's insight:
A plea for informed consent form wording that everyone can understand what they are agreeing to for medical procedures...or use KISS (Keep it Simple, Stupid) approach.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

How the choices on the U.S. Census form limit our identity

How the choices on the U.S. Census form limit our identity | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Exploring race, immigration and the emerging American identity
John Jung's insight:
An innovative new site for exploring race, immigration and the emerging American identity with contributed posts and videos from its readers.  The creator of this resource, Jose Antonio Vargas,  states "...we cannot talk about immigration in a vacuum. Because we do not live single-issue lives, immigration is connected to race, gender, class and LGBTQ issues. Our lives, in fact, intersect with one another. As such, #EmergingUS is not targeting one race or ethnicity: it’s for Americans of all races and ethnicities. #EmergingUS is not just for Millennials: it’s for Americans of all generations. #EmergingUS’ audience is all of us."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Review: Compelling narrative about Chiang, Mao, birth of modern China

Review: Compelling narrative about Chiang, Mao, birth of modern China | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it

Book review by George Koo of "Ruling a Quarter of Mankind," political science professor Paul Tai’s comparative analysis of the personalities of Chiang Kai-Shek and Mao Zedong — two most important figures in China 

John Jung's insight:
A fascinating comparison of the parallels of the 2 most important leaders in China, rivals Chiang Kai-Shek and Mao Zedong, during most of the past century.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Bengali Harlem: Author documents a lost history of immigration in America

Bengali Harlem: Author documents a lost history of immigration in America | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it

"Vivek Bald’s meticulous reconstruction reveals a lost history of South Asian sojourning and life-making in the United States. At a time when Asian immigrants were vilified and criminalized, Bengali Muslims quietly became part of some of America’s most iconic neighborhoods of color, from Tremé in New Orleans to Detroit’s Black Bottom, from West Baltimore to Harlem. Many started families with Creole, Puerto Rican, and African American women. As steel and auto workers in the Midwest, as traders in the South, and as halal hot dog vendors on 125th Street, these immigrants created lives as remarkable as they are unknown.

John Jung's insight:
"In the final years of the nineteenth century, small groups of Muslim peddlers arrived at Ellis Island every summer, bags heavy with embroidered silks from their home villages in Bengal. The American demand for “Oriental goods” took these migrants on a curious path, from New Jersey’s beach boardwalks into the heart of the segregated South. 

Two decades later, hundreds of Indian Muslim seamen began jumping ship in New York and Baltimore, escaping the engine rooms of British steamers to find less brutal work onshore. As factory owners sought their labor and anti-Asian immigration laws closed in around them, these men built clandestine networks that stretched from the northeastern waterfront across the industrial Midwest. 

 The stories of these early working-class migrants vividly contrast with our typical understanding of immigration and challenge assumptions about assimilation and reveal cross-racial affinities beneath the surface of early twentieth-century America."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

As a Chinaman saw us; passages from his letters to a friend at home : Gratton, Henry Pearson : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive

As a Chinaman saw us; passages from his letters to a friend at home : Gratton, Henry Pearson : Free Download & Streaming : Internet Archive | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it

Written in 1908 as a set of letters to a friend in China about American values and customs, often with a satirical tone, the author is a veritable Chinese "Alex De Tocqueville."

John Jung's insight:
A perceptive and critical view of America published in 1908 anonymously by a Chinese intellect as a rebuttal, for the most part, of many of the anti-Chinese views of Americans.  Written as a set of letters to a friend in China about American values and customs, often with a satirical tone, the author is a veritable Chinese "Alex De Tocqueville."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Foreign-Born Populations in the American South | South Writ Large

Foreign-Born Populations in the American South | South Writ Large | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
An interactive map of the American South that shows you the percentage of foreign born population for each county.
John Jung's insight:
An  interactive visualization showing a representation of global connections throughout the American South. Using American Community Survey five-year estimates, the data considers the number of foreign-born residents in each county, and the countries of birth for those residents.

Scroll your mouse across the South, county by county, to see the numbers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Ching Chow Daily Gallery

Ching Chow Daily Gallery | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Stanley Link Ching Chow Dailies
John Jung's insight:
Ching Chow was a nationally published newspaper comic from the late 1920s by Sidney Smith who dispensed aphorisms, often cryptic, in the vein of "Confucian sayings." Some were disparaging of Chinese and Chow Ching was a stereotype of the inscrutable Chinese. Smith died in 1935 but the character was continued by Stanley Link until the late 1950s and then drawn by other artists.

"Ching Chong Chinaman", a mocking racial slur is more familiar than Ching Chow.

To see a large set of the cartoons:  
(NOTE: to access these links, you have to copy and paste the link in its entirety because I could not make them 'live' links)

 http://www.umich.edu/~csie/comicart/StripArt/chingchow/chingchow.html

To learn about some political and 'hidden agendas' that appeared after 1950, see  
  (Note: to access these links, you have to copy and paste the link in its entirety because I could not make them 'live' links)
http://www.wfmu.org/~davem/docs/ching.html
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Chinese Quest | Five Hungry Jewish Guys' Quest to Find the Best Chinese Restaurant on Long Island

The Chinese Quest | Five Hungry Jewish Guys' Quest to Find the Best Chinese Restaurant on Long Island | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Five Hungry Jewish Guys' Quest to Find the Best Chinese Restaurant on Long Island
John Jung's insight:
A delightful blog that might have been titled, "Jews for Chinese Food," where 5 Jewish guys in the NYC area get together in search of the best Chinese food fix in town. Makes you hungry just reading it.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

How Did the One-Child Policy Change China?: An Interview with Mei Fong - The New Yorker

How Did the One-Child Policy Change China?: An Interview with Mei Fong - The New Yorker | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Barbara Demick talks to the journalist Mei Fong about the repercussions of China’s one-child policy.
John Jung's insight:
Interview with Mei Fong, author of "One Child: The Story of China's Most Radical Experiment," describes the rationale for the 1980 policy to reduce the growth of the huge population, some of the draconian methods of enforcement, social and ethical issues, and unforeseen adverse consequences.  China faces a ticking time-bomb as the population ages and the "only child' (mostly male due to Chinese preference for sons) must deal with taking care of their aging parents.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Historical Tapestry: Reading Chinese historical fiction

Historical Tapestry: Reading Chinese historical fiction | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
James Lande's annotated list of selected historical fiction works about China.
John Jung's insight:
Writer James Lande's annotated list of selected historical fiction works about China. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Forgotten men: The Chinese Labour Corps of World War One - YouTube

A pictorial history of the 140,000 Chinese labourers who supported the Allied war effort in Europe during the First World War has been displayed at Charin
John Jung's insight:
Video in English with Chinese subtitles about the political background of the Chinese Labour Corp, over 100,000 Chinese recruited from Shandung province, to provide noncombat support in WW I for U. K. and France (https://youtu.be/YNW0WpQsYkI).

A longer lecture on the history of the Chinese Labour Corp:  https://youtu.be/dEqiJbpRxII
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Exhibiting Race: The Power of Portraiture

Exhibiting Race: The Power of Portraiture | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Is race something we wear on our faces? Does it lie our skin colour, place of origin, or ancestry? Is it tangible? Two online exhibits challenge these ideas. The White Australia Policy began in 190…
John Jung's insight:
The real face of White Australia is a thought-provoking and innovative website, created as part of the "Invisible Australians" project. The experimental browser showcases, in random order, portraits of individuals who were monitored by the Australian government. Using a facial detection script, the creators of the website extracted portraits from thousands of government documents. The finished product, an experimental browser, allows the user to “explore the records of the White Australia Policy, through the faces of those people.” Not only can users view the faces of those afflicted, they can also click on each portrait to view primary sources associated with the respective individual.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

A Land of Shadows - Jason Francisco

A Land of Shadows - Jason Francisco | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
A Land of Shadows is an inquiry into immigrant Chinese life in rural 19th century California—a communal life that was itinerant, vulnerable, preyed upon, resilient, and centrally important in the state’s and the nation’s history. Taking its title from a traditional Chinese metaphor for the domain of the ancestors, tnoted photographer Jason Francisco embeds his own photographs of today's remnants of Chinese settlement in the Sierra Nevada foothills and the Sacramento Delta areas into a forgotten set of 176  government mug shots of Chinese immigrants, made by D.D. Beatty in Downieville, circa 1890.
John Jung's insight:
By asking historic and contemporary pictures alternately to intervene on and slip away from one another, the new book addresses disjunctions and silences within the historical experience of the Chinese American community, and the difficulty of their formation as memory.  

The Afterword details the background and significance of this work.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

What's So 'Chinese' About A Chinese Fire Drill?

What's So 'Chinese' About A Chinese Fire Drill? | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
For the uninitiated, a "Chinese fire drill" can be described as a form of vehicular musical chairs. Where did that name come from?
John Jung's insight:
The Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional Usage traces the first pejorative use of "Chinese" to around 1880.  "Chinese" has been used as a descriptor to indicate things that were hasty, cheap or amateur.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Tenement Museum | From Ellis Island to Orchard Street with Victoria Confino

Tenement Museum | From Ellis Island to Orchard Street with Victoria Confino | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it

From Ellis Island to Orchard Street with Victoria Confino is an online game that transports players back to 1916 to experience life as a new European An onlimmigrant in New York City .

The game allows you to create an immigrant character and passport, sail across the Atlantic, go through inspection at Ellis Island, and finally to build a life as a new immigrant in New York City. Along the way, players can get insights and information from Victoria Confino, a girl who immigrated in 1913 and lives in a tenement on New York’s Lower East Side. From Ellis Island to Orchard Street includes period photos and primary source documents that illuminate the great wave of immigration to America. Created by The Lower East Side Tenement Museum, Ariel Newland, Jeff Tancil and William Martin.

John Jung's insight:
The Tenement Museum in New York has an online virtual tour showing the immigration process in the early 1900s for a European coming to the U.S.  through Ellis Island to settle on Orchard Street in the Lower East side of New York City. Not an easy process but it is quite a contrast to the more difficult experiences of Chinese who immigrated to the U. S. via Angel Island in the San Francisco bay. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Q. and A.: Chan Koonchung on Imagining a Non-Communist China

Q. and A.: Chan Koonchung on Imagining a Non-Communist China | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
In Mr. Chan’s alternative history novel, “The Second Year of Jianfeng,” the country “would definitely have been a nicer place,” he said.
John Jung's insight:
A novel with a "What if" scenario of China's history that examines whether China would be different if the KMT of Chiang Kai-Shek had prevailed over CCP of Mao Zedong.  As one reviewer noted...today's China would have been Mao's worse nightmare.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Five Hmong sisters get five degrees

Five Hmong sisters get five degrees | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it

Five Hmong sisters get five professional degrees.  All of them grew up in Merced, CA. and went to Merced public schools, preschool through their senior years. The four oldest, motivated by what they learned from their parents by watching them work and listening to their life stories, decided that the way to give back to their Hmong culture and community here would be to study medicine and science. 

John Jung's insight:
A shining example of "what makes America great"...the story of 5 daughters of Hmong refugees fleeing Communism who settled in Merced in California's central valley and overcame difficult hurdles to achieve academic success and return to give back to the Hmong community.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Terras dos chinês

Terras dos chinês | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
In Terras dos chinês curio shop, Karen Tam recreates spaces such as the Chinese restaurants, karaoke lounges, opium dens, Chinatown curio shops and other sites of cultural encounters to look at how the corporeal experience of space allows one to understand its history and community. description
John Jung's insight:
Karen Tam’s installation deconstructs and reconstructs different ‘ethnic spaces’ to see which elements signify meaning for the public and thus play a role in influencing Western perception of the Chinese, or the Other.

 In Terras dos chinês curio shop, Tam recreates spaces such as the Chinese restaurants, karaoke lounges, opium dens, Chinatown curio shops and other sites of cultural encounters to look at how the corporeal experience of space allows one to understand its history and community.  

 Karen Tam is an artist whose research focuses on the various forms of constructions and imaginations of cultures and communities.   She lives and works in Montreal and London, and holds a PhD in Cultural Studies from Goldsmiths (University of London).  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Common People: The History of an English Family - Alison Light

Common People: The History of an English Family - Alison Light | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Common People: The History of an English Family by Alison Light. Alison Light tracks her forebears over two centuries, across Britain and beyond.
John Jung's insight:
"Common People" by Alison Light is a remarkable personal story that combines her detailed search for ancestors with the history of ordinary people in Britain.  The typical family history is akin to a skeleton, a structure of "bare bones with no flesh." In contrast, Light's book provides ample meat on every bone, describing the life and times of each ancestor. It is a hybrid tour de force combining genealogical research with cultural anthropology.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Research-China.Org

Research-China.Org | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Information on China's orphanages, foster families, orphanage records, etc.
John Jung's insight:
Research-China.Org is committed to providing Chinese adoptees and their families as much information as possible concerning a child's pre-adoption history. The founder, Brian Shuy, adopted three Chinese baby girls before he discovered how easily many baby girls are sold, stolen, and illegally adopted out of China.

"The Hunan scandal served as the "paradigm shifter" that allowed future research and media investigations to reveal that issues of baby-buying, Family Planning confiscations, and other extra-legal methods of obtaining children were frequently and pervasively used by orphanages to procure children for adoption. First-hand accounts of birth families, foster families, Civil Affairs officials, and finders reveal that nearly every orphanage in Chongqing, Jiangxi, Hunan, and the other large supplying Provinces employs some manner of "incentive program" to recruit children into their facilities. Some pay money, others work with Family Planning, others make false assurances to birth families of education and other opportunities in order to have those birth families relinquish their children."
 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

At MIT, food for thought

At MIT, food for thought | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Consuming Food, Producing Culture” symposium at MIT uses cuisine to explore immigration, identity, and politics.
John Jung's insight:
Highlights of a fascinating conference at M.I.T. examining some interrelationships among cuisine, immigration, identity, and politics.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art in Memphis

The Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art in Memphis | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
This unique museum holds one of the largest collections of jade in the country.
John Jung's insight:
This hidden treasure is a must visit museum in the heart of Memphis. It has a fantastic jade collection side by side with Judaic art.  

Understandably, most Memphis visitors go to Graceland, the Civil Rights Museum, and Beale Street, but they shouldn't overlook this remarkable Belz Museum.

 http://www.belzmuseum.org

Admission prices are very reasonable.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Memorial

The Memorial | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
Chinese were recruited to Liverpool, UK during World War II. These 20,000 merchant seamen worked on the cargo ships and the oil tankers that brought in the vital war supplies Britain needed to fight the war.

After WWII,  Britain mistreated these Chinese just as she had done with the 100,000 in the Chinese Labour Corp who helped Britain in WW I.  

No longer wanted in Britain, the Chinese merchant seamen of WW II  were repatriated to China even those who had married British wives and had children in UK.  

One of these many mixed-race offspring, Yvonne Foley, worked for years to create a memorial to recognize the vital contributions of the Chinese merchant seamen.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

 Chinese Labour Corps in The First World War 

 Chinese Labour Corps in The First World War  | Stuff I Found Intriguing | Scoop.it
Some of the over 100,000 Chinese laborers recruited by UK during WW I
John Jung's insight:
From 1916, as casualties mounted on the Western Front, there was an urgent need to raise a labour force to take over the heavy and miscellaneous work behind the lines thus freeing up men for combatant duties. The British, following the French lead, signed an agreement with China - at the time a non-belligerent nation - whereby Chinese recruits would travel the great distance to Europe in order to meet this need.

The contribution by the Chinese Labour Corps was barely recognized at the end of the war.There is no tribute to them among Britain's 40,000 war memorials, there are no descendants in Britain because they were refused any right to settle after the war.  In fact, the British magazine PUNCH published several racist cartoons mocking the Chinese  such as this one:


However, a campaign was launched in 2014 by the Chinese community in Britain to create a permanent memorial in London to the Chinese Labour Corps and the dirty, dangerous, vital work they did behind the lines on the western front.

PUNCH also published a larger set of anti-Chinese drawings as early as 1851: http://punch.photoshelter.com/search?I_DSC=Chinese&G_ID=G0000czGdMEOaVXY&C_ID=&I_DSC_AND=t&_ACT=usrSearch
more...
No comment yet.