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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from Something Wired Something Cool
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Super Lightweight 3D Printed Balloon Powered Toy Car (VIDEO) - Shapeways Blog on 3D Printing News & Innovation

Super Lightweight 3D Printed Balloon Powered Toy Car (VIDEO) - Shapeways Blog on 3D Printing News & Innovation | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it
Check out this super cute lightweight 3D printed ballon powered toy car by dominikraskin.

Via Dinamika SOE
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from Vegetarian Recipes
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urban vegan: ravioli tutorial and garlicky-kale ravioli recipe


Via Amy Cox
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from World Environment Nature News
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Swallows are evolving to avoid cars and trucks, study finds

Swallows are evolving to avoid cars and trucks, study finds | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it
Collisions with road vehicles are driving a population of swallows to evolve into faster, more agile fliers with shortened wings.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from World Environment Nature News
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Russian bears who are so addicted to aviation fuel they sniff it until they pass out

Russian bears who are so addicted to aviation fuel they sniff it until they pass out | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it
The brown bears sniff kerosene and gasoline from containers left in the Kronotsky Nature Reserve in the far east of Russia, before digging a shallow hole and lying in a 'nirvana' position.

Via Maria Nunzia @Varvera
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Penguin Fail - Best Bloopers from Penguins Spy in the Huddle

It's not easy being a penguin, as we soon learnt going through all the material shot for the BBC's Penguins - Spy in the Huddle, narrated by David Tennant. F...

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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Exploring the Deep 1 | Life under the Sea

Heiko Sahling is a biologist and deep sea geoscientist at the MARUM Research Center. The area he studies is in the Indian Ocean, off the coast of Pakistan. T...

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from Something Wired Something Cool
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Love In The Time Of Social Media

Love In The Time Of Social Media | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it
According to a trend piece in the New York Times last week, gone are the days when getting through a breakup meant putting everything that reminded you of your ex--in Beyonce’s words--“in a box to the left.” These days, we need a sophisticated...

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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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rPETable: UK Company Makes First Ever 100% Recycled Food-Safe Plastic Products

rPETable: UK Company Makes First Ever 100% Recycled Food-Safe Plastic Products | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it
UK company Invicta Group has become the first company in the world to make food-safe products from 100% recycled plastic.

Via Kathy Dowsett
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from No Such Thing As The News
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Researchers explore connecting the brain to machines

Researchers explore connecting the brain to machines | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it
Behind a locked door in a white-walled basement in a research building in Tempe, Ariz., a monkey sits stone-still in a chair, eyes locked on a computer screen. From his head protrudes a bundle of wires; from his mouth, a plastic tube.

Via No Such Thing As The News
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from Amazing Science
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The Mariana trench, deepest point in the ocean is teeming with life

The Mariana trench, deepest point in the ocean is teeming with life | Stuff about stuff which I think is important or interesting | Scoop.it

Hollywood director James Cameron found little evidence of life when hedescended nearly 11,000 metres to the deepest point in the world's oceans last year. If only he had taken a microscope and looked just a few centimetres deeper.

 

Ronnie Glud at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, and his colleagues, have discovered unusually high levels of microbial activity in the sediments at the site of Cameron's dive – Challenger Deep at the bottom of the western Pacific's Mariana Trench.

 

Glud's team dispatched autonomous sensors and sample collectors into the trench to measure microbial activity in the top 20 centimetres of sediment on the sea bed. The pressure there is almost 1100 times greater than at the surface. Finding food, however, is an even greater challenge than surviving high pressures for anything calling the trench home.

 

Any nourishment must come in the form of detritus falling from the surface ocean, most of which is consumed by other organisms on the way down. Only 1 per cent of the organic matter generated at the surface reaches the sea floor's abyssal plains, 3000 to 6000 metres below sea level. So what are the chances of organic matter making it even deeper, into the trenches that form when one tectonic plate ploughs beneath another?

Surprisingly, the odds seem high. Glud's team compared sediment samples taken from Challenger Deep and a reference site on the nearby abyssal plain. The bacteria at Challenger Deep were around 10 times as abundant as those on the abyssal plain, with every cubic centimetre of sediment containing 10 million microbes. The deep microbes were also twice as active as their shallower kin.

These figures make sense, says Glud, because ocean trenches are particularly good at capturing sediment. They are broad as well as deep, with a steep slope down to the deepest point, so any sediment falling on their flanks quickly cascades down to the bottom in muddy avalanches. Although the sediment may contain no more than 1 per cent organic matter, so much of it ends up at Challenger Deep that the level of microbial activity shoots up.

"There is much more than meets the eye at the bottom of the sea," says Hans Røy, at Aarhus University in Denmark. Last year, he studied seafloor sediments below the north Pacific gyre – an area that, unlike Challenger Deep, is almost devoid of nutrients. Remarkably, though, even here Røy found living microbes.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Rescooped by Telissa Pattycakes from All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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UnderwaterTimes.com | Researchers: 'Dirty Blizzard' In Gulf May Account For Missing Deepwater Horizon Oil

Oil from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon spill acted as a catalyst for plankton and other surface materials to clump together and fall to the sea floor in a massive sedimentation event that researchers are calling a...

Via Kathy Dowsett
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