Study Skills
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FREE Study Skills Resources for Educators, Students, and Parents

FREE Study Skills Resources for Educators, Students, and Parents | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Over 100 practical study skills articles, curriculums, 1,000+ tips from visitors and six self-assessments with immediate recommendations for improvement.
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Provide practical study skills articles, curriculums, and hepful tips for students, educators and parents.

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6 Reasons - Massive Growth in E-Learning

6 Reasons - Massive Growth in E-Learning | Study Skills | Scoop.it
In 2015 over 35 million people registered for an online MOOC, up from 17 million the year before. That’s a massive growth in E-Learning, up over 100%
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Essential Study Skills: Strategies for Ultimate Success

Essential Study Skills: Strategies for Ultimate Success | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Learn to; recall faster & smarter, study from books, read effectively, use a combination of study skills and preempt Qs.
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7 Proactive Studying Strategies for Students Who Hate Studying

7 Proactive Studying Strategies for Students Who Hate Studying | Study Skills | Scoop.it
This article features some great studying strategies that will get students learning to love studying, no matter where their study habits are!
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Useful studying tips.

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How Exercise Makes You Smarter, Happier, and Less Stressed

'Exercise is like taking a little bit of Prozac and a little bit of Ritalin,' says a Harvard researcher, describing the amazing effects of fitness on the brain.
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, February 17, 6:35 PM

I don't know if this makes me want to go out for a jog, but the author makes a great case for exercise and why skipping recess and PE is a bad idea. -Lon

Jon Pratlett's curator insight, February 22, 1:26 AM

Do it daily. Make it a habit. Your mind, body and spirit will thank you forever.

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Technology tips that can help you study this year

Technology tips that can help you study this year | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Let technology help you, not hurt you this semester.
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Harness the technology to help you study better.

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Studying Learning: A Quick Guide to Documentation, Reflection, and Analysis

Studying Learning: A Quick Guide to Documentation, Reflection, and Analysis | Study Skills | Scoop.it

Download this free guide to studying learning, complete with tools that support documentation, reflection, and qualitative data analysis.

Rosidah Awang's insight:

Useful tips in studying and learning.

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3 Ways E-Learning Is Changing in 2016

3 Ways E-Learning Is Changing in 2016 | Study Skills | Scoop.it

As we come to the end of the year, we look forward to what 2016 holds.

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E-learning trends.

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⭐ A "self"-assessment tool that is a snap!

⭐ A "self"-assessment tool that is a snap! | Study Skills | Scoop.it
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, January 10, 3:11 PM
Teach your students to take a "SELFIE" before turning in work.
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New Vision for Education_Report2015

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David Witzeling's curator insight, April 6, 2015 7:22 PM

This is a lengthy article detailing the relationship between 21st century skills and the adoption of technology as a way to promote growth in those skill areas. If you are here, you might find this very much "preaching to the choir," but the article provides a solid basis for understanding the need to integrate technology into education.

Melina Dayana Calizaya Torres's curator insight, April 6, 2015 10:19 PM

SO TRUE

Dr. Deborah Brennan's curator insight, April 7, 2015 2:19 PM

The World Economic Forum has published a new white paper called New Vision for Education: Unlocking the Potential of Technology; the link for the full report is included at the end of this article.  The World Economic Forum is a not-for-profit international institution headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland.  Although the focus of this report is worldwide, the gaps in identified twenty-first century skills are very applicable to schools in the USA.  In a powerful statement, the report says: “By the time students enter college and the labour market, deficiencies that have not been addressed earlier can be far more difficult and costly to remedy.” (p 8-9).

The report differentiates 21st century skills among foundational literacies, competencies, and character qualities. It sees foundational skills as what schools and systems traditionally teach and measure: literacy, numeracy, scientific literacy, instructional-communication technology literacy, financial literacy, and cultural and civic literacy.  Competencies sited include critical thinking/problem solving, creativity, communication and collaboration. While curiosity, initiative, persistence/grit, adaptability, leadership, and social and cultural awareness are included in a category called character qualities.  Appendix 1 includes definitions of 21st century skills.

The instructional cycle is referred to as a “closed loop” in this report. Beginning with clear learning objectives through the development of curriculum and instructional strategies to instructional delivery, ongoing assessment, interventions and the tracking of learning outcomes in a repeating complex system.  The report looks at ways that technology can be embedded into each step of the instructional loop to improve student learning outcomes and eliminate the skill gap, providing some resources that might be used at different phases of the cycle.

The report cites differences in the use of technology tools to close the skill gap, looking at different income levels among countries which create different contexts and stating that there are fundamental social and economic problems, such as poverty, that impede learning and underlie the skills gap. Although the deficiencies in many undeveloped countries far surpass those found in the United States, it is my perspective that there are different contexts within the United States itself that must be acknowledged and addressed.

The importance of creativity, problem solving and innovation to the economic well-being of our nation and therefore, the employability of our workforce cannot be stressed enough. The pressure of standardized testing can lead to a standardized curriculum and instruction model that does not allow  the classroom time for these skills to develop. Teachers caught in this dilemma are often driven to insure success on state tests at the cost of providing time for experimentation, reflection, and collaborative feedback. The report does suggest using technology for some of the foundational skills in order to free teacher time to provide instruction on competency and character skills.

In two of the examples from low income countries, technology was used to provide scripted lessons that were created centrally  to under-trained teachers. My preference would be to  more fully train teachers or provide a mentor/coach rather than a “turn the page” curriculum model.

One of the tenants of the article is the need to define and find a metric to assess each of these 21st century skills in order to compare countries skill level. Although I agree with the need to define the skills needed and provide training and resources to teachers so these skills can be embedded into the curriculum and instruction, the idea of an assessment to measure creativity or persistence fills me with dread. Paul Torrance developed a well-used test for creativity used to screen students for school gifted and talented programs.  It is not a test that can be administered and interpreted without training. The idea of administering a standardized test which by definition is convergent in thinking to measure a thinking skill that is divergent by definition seems inappropriate and a major shortcoming of this report.

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Interaction during reading is key to language development

Interaction during reading is key to language development | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Interaction, not just the sound of words being read from a page, is the key to language development during reading.

That’s according to a new study from the University of Iowa that looked at how mothers responded to their 12-month-olds during book reading, puppet play, and toy play. What researchers found is the babies made more speech-like sounds during reading than when playing with puppets or toys. They also discovered mothers were more responsive to these types of sounds while reading to their child than during the other activities.

The findings might explain why book reading has been linked to language development in young children.
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The Benefits of Hands-On Learning by writerleah

The Benefits of Hands-On Learning by writerleah | Study Skills | Scoop.it
by writerleah
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Benefits of hands-on learning.

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Two Handy Tables Featuring Tips to Help You Conduct Effective Google Searches via @Medkh9

Two Handy Tables Featuring Tips to Help You Conduct Effective Google Searches via @Medkh9 | Study Skills | Scoop.it
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Tips on effective Google searches.

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Study Skills Guide: Study Tips, Strategies & Lessons for Students

Study Skills Guide: Study Tips, Strategies & Lessons for Students | Study Skills | Scoop.it
A study skills guide for students providing study skills tips, strategies and lessons aimed at improving study habits, reading comprehension, writing and test taking ability.
Rosidah Awang's insight:

Provide useful tips and techniques for studying smarter and resources on study skills on various subjects.

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How Kids Learn Resilience

How Kids Learn Resilience | Study Skills | Scoop.it
In recent years, the idea that educators should be teaching kids qualities like grit and self-control has caught on. Successful strategies, though, are hard to come by.
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Study Skills & Strategies - How to Learn Quickly and Easily

Study Skills & Strategies - How to Learn Quickly and Easily | Study Skills | Scoop.it

Learn how to study more effectively with advanced studying techniques. Learn faster by improving your studying skills..

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5 Types of Learners – Study Tips for Nursing Students | NurseBuff

5 Types of Learners – Study Tips for Nursing Students | NurseBuff | Study Skills | Scoop.it

Nursing students studies everyday. Here are some study tips for Nursing students.

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Types of learners.

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The 7 Styles Of Learning: Which Works For You? - Edudemic

The 7 Styles Of Learning: Which Works For You? - Edudemic | Study Skills | Scoop.it
You love to learn. Your students, colleagues, and parents love to learn. But what kind of styles of learning are most effective for each party?
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Styles of learning.

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Corporate training skills applied to the 4 stages of adult learning

Corporate training skills applied to the 4 stages of adult learning | Study Skills | Scoop.it
The skillful learning facilitator adopts quality training strategies to respond to all stages of adult learning and competence.
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The stages of competence and learning.

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25 Powerful Creative Problem Solving Questions You Can Use for Any Challenge - SmartStorming

25 Powerful Creative Problem Solving Questions You Can Use for Any Challenge - SmartStorming | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Asking powerful questions can be a highly effective method for enhancing group discovery and creative problem solving. The right question, asked at the appropriate moment, can transform the unknown into new understanding, simplify complex issues, stimulate leaps in imagination, shift a group out of the doldrums, and quickly refocus efforts that have veered off onto unproductive tangents.
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Nicole Copeland's curator insight, February 4, 11:37 AM

Powerful questions can help learners take a new path. Sometimes that makes all the difference.

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A Wonderful Poster on Learning Styles | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Wonderful Poster on Learning Styles | Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Study Skills | Scoop.it

They say diversity is the spice of life but in schools diversity is the backbone of learning. Have a look at your classroom, you will see a wide range of varying learning styles. But , as a teacher, do you tend to these learning styles ? Have you ever questioned whether your teaching method(s) really meet the learning needs of all your students or just a select few ? Answering these questions requires a little insight from both cognitive psychology and learning pedagogy.


 A mixture of these  two fields of study results in a direct application of Howard Gardner Multiple Intelligences ( cognitive psychology ) within a classroom context ( learning styles ). Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has previously, and  in several posts, featured some awesome posters on multiple intelligence and today I am sharing with you another equally interesting graphic on the different learning styles your students have. Please have a look and share with us your views. Enjoy

 

Click headline to view poster full size--

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Various learning styles.

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Formative Assessment Works! - Why, What, and Whether

Formative Assessment Works! - Why, What, and Whether | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Formative assessment works! This phrase, or some paraphrased version of it, is voiced with increasing frequency in many parts of the world. But why are more and more of today's educators touting the instructional virtues of formative assessment?
Most observers credit British researchers Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam with kicking off today's worldwide interest in formative assessment. In 1998, Black and Wiliam published two important works: an article in the journal Phi Delta kappan and an extensive review of empirical research studies focused on classroom assessment. In their kappan article, Black and Wiliam (1998b) argue that formative assessment, properly employed in the classroom, will help students learn what is being taught to a substantially better degree. They support this argument with evidence from their research review (1998a), a meta-analysis in which they conclude that student gains in learning triggered by formative assessment are "amongst the largest ever reported for educational interventions" (p. 61).
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Active vs. Passive: The Science of Learning | L...

Active vs. Passive: The Science of Learning | L... | Study Skills | Scoop.it

“Nigel Nisbet explains the difference between using technology to replicate a passive teaching methodology and finding a genuine active learning method” | Learning & Mind & Brain

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Formative Assessment Works

Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

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Beth Crisafulli Hofer's comment, January 10, 6:54 PM
I'm going to add some of these to our framework!
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


)
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Create an Environment for Creative Collaboration

Create an Environment for Creative Collaboration | Study Skills | Scoop.it
Let's get out of our little corner office and have some fun collaborating. What is the last thing you remember about your last boring meeting? Maybe very little.... Make your next meeting a Collaboration... a Creative Collaboration. ~Mia
Rosidah Awang's insight:

Create creative collaboration environment.

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, January 11, 7:41 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

Lihi Telem's curator insight, January 12, 4:30 AM

סוג של אינפוגרפיקה עם ריכוז המלצות ליצירת סביבת יצירה שיתופית המקדמת חדשנות ויצירתיות. מזמינה שינויים במרחב, בסדירויות ומציעה אפשרויות משחק.