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Are These 5 Things Stopping You From Studying Abroad?

Are These 5 Things Stopping You From Studying Abroad? | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Read about Are These 5 Things Stopping You From Studying Abroad? on StudyAbroad.com the top site for Study Abroad, Volunteer Abroad, Intern Abroad, all Abroad Programs worldwide!
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What's stopping you from studying abroad? Learn the truth behind why many people don't study abroad
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Studying abroad: get ready for an overseas adventure

Studying abroad: get ready for an overseas adventure | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Graduates discuss why they decided to study for an MA abroad
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Graduates discuss why they decided to study for an MA abroad
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What students say they’ve gained from studying abroad | news @ Northeastern

What students say they’ve gained from studying abroad | news @ Northeastern | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Five students who volunteered to share their own global experiences at Thursday’s Study Abroad Fair explain why those experiences were so meaningful—and why other students should consider study abroad.
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Study abroad: The world is your classroom

Study abroad: The world is your classroom | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
It’s cheaper, yes; but British students are finding other, more surprising
benefits in studying abroad, says Cristina Criddle
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The Cost of Not Studying Abroad Is Real

The Cost of Not Studying Abroad Is Real | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Not studying abroad lowers a persons chances of success in the ever-globalizing world -- and that has economic consequences. By Kenneth Buff.
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25 Reasons To Study Abroad

25 Reasons To Study Abroad | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
From new friends and experiences to gaining an edge in the workforce, here are 25 Reasons To Study Abroad. Now, what are you waiting for?
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Study Abroad Reflection: My Year at Oxford University

SHOW MORE!!! Hey, friends! Long time no see, I know! But there is good news: I am now officially back home in the states and on summer vacation, which onl
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The 20 most popular destinations for Americans to study abroad

The 20 most popular destinations for Americans to study abroad | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Europe reigns as the most popular study abroad destination, with eight top 20 countries, according to the Institute of International Education.
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Gain professional experience by going abroad!

Gain professional experience by going abroad! | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
There are many reasons for a student to go abroad as an Erasmus exchange student.
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10 amazing ways to see Peru

10 amazing ways to see Peru | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Beyond Machu Picchu: 10 amazing ways to see Peru https://t.co/mmgi9HApWq #travel https://t.co/L5BJeUTxC0
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What Nobody Tells You Before Studying Abroad - Darling Magazine

What Nobody Tells You Before Studying Abroad - Darling Magazine | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Let’s talk about the REAL reel for a second.
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Princeton University - Senior thesis: Study abroad inspires project on languages, education

Princeton University - Senior thesis: Study abroad inspires project on languages, education | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Senior thesis: Study abroad inspires project on languages, education
Posted April 9, 2015; 12:00 p.m.

by Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
Tweet e-mail | print
"I say, 'Go, just go.'"

This is the advice senior Abidjan Walker gives fellow Princeton students wondering about studying abroad. Not only has Walker pursued extensive international experience as an undergraduate, she is using these travels as a launching pad for her latest journey  — writing her senior thesis. 

Walker, a comparative literature major from Hanover, New Hampshire, has studied in China, Morocco and Switzerland. Building her linguistic and cultural toolkit sparked her senior thesis, which focuses on the language of instruction in educational systems in these countries. Walker also has had an internship in France.


Walker visits the Forbidden City in Beijing during the eight-week Princeton in Beijing program — a Mandarin immersion program — at the end of her freshman year. (Photo courtesy of Abidjan Walker, Class of 2015)
Walker came to Princeton proficient in French, which her mother taught her after a Peace Corps posting to Zaire (now the Democratic Republic of Congo). In high school, Walker studied German. During her time at Princeton she has taken up Mandarin, and studied Standard Arabic and Moroccan Arabic abroad. 

"I knew coming to college that I wanted to study abroad," said Walker. 

Walker's linguistic journey began freshman year when she took her first Mandarin class and then participated in the Princeton in Beijing program over the summer. With other Princeton students, she spent eight weeks in China communicating only in Mandarin. 

With the help of the Office of International Programs, Walker's next destination was Rabat, Morocco, where she was based for the first semester of her junior year. There, she lived with a host family and took Arabic classes and classes in the humanities taught in French, offered through IES Abroad. She also studied with Moroccan students at Mohammed V University at Souissi, also in French. 

Once a week, Walker taught English to refugee children from West Africa through an internship with the East West Foundation. "It was challenging, but I loved it," she said. 

After Morocco, Walker studied at the University of Fribourg in Switzerland, which offers instruction in French and German. She was enrolled with the American College Program in Switzerland. 

Walker took five classes in French and five in German, each of which met once a week. A highlight was a class on intercultural education, which was required of Swiss students studying to be teachers. "I learned how Switzerland is working to help immigrants learn French, German and Italian in schools," Walker said.

Walker's next stop was Paris, where she pursued a Princeton in France internship with an advising firm and helped her boss work with the Paris office of the European Council on Foreign Relations. She did translations and research, working alongside fellow intern and Princeton student Annie Tao, Class of 2016.


As a junior, Walker spent a semester in Rabat, Morocco, where she lived with a host family and took Arabic classes and classes in the humanities taught in French. (Photo courtesy of Abidjan Walker, Class of 2015)
Connecting the dots
Through her experiences abroad, Walker increasingly knew she wanted to write about languages and education systems for her senior thesis. To help her work through her ideas, she looked close to home for a faculty adviser — Whitman College, where Walker is a residential college adviser and where the master is Sandra Bermann, the Cotsen Professor of the Humanities and a professor of comparative literature. 

"Talking with Master Bermann helped me narrow down my thoughts," Walker said. "For a comparative literature thesis, she helped me see the focus on language. It was an important choice, as language is such a key part of culture."

Bermann said Walker brings to her topic "enormous curiosity — and courage — in confronting complex educational issues.

"This is an interesting thesis since it grows out of personal experience and research, yet develops a compelling, particularly wide-ranging comparison, and one of public importance: it looks at educational systems in three countries from the standpoint of language," Bermann said. "What difference does the language of instruction make for students in Morocco, China or Switzerland, particularly since languages are such rich repositories of cultural power? More broadly, how might different linguistic and educational experiences be compared — and shared — across cultures, particularly as we look to the future?

"That Abidjan knows the languages in question and has seen them in the educational contexts she describes encourages a mature and never simplistic analysis," she said.


Walker visits the Sahara Desert during her semester in Morocco. (Photo courtesy of Abidjan Walker, Class of 2015)
The two junior papers (JPs) Walker wrote during her year abroad positioned her well for her thesis topic. "I was surprised that the senior thesis was not as daunting as it first seemed," Walker said. "I think that the JPs truly give you the preparation to take on such a big project."

One paper focused on the influence of French colonialism on Moroccan education, highlighted in the novel "Le Passé Simple," by Driss Chraïbi. The second paper centered on the memoir "Nebenaussen," written in German by Christian Schmid about his experiences in French schools in Switzerland.

Bolstered with this research, books from Firestone Library and Bermann's guidance through weekly meetings that started in her senior year, Walker identified a secondary adviser who could help her explore the education aspect of her work. She started to meet with Kathleen Nolan, a program associate in teacher preparation at Princeton. 

"I'm honored to have the opportunity to work with Abidjan," Nolan said. "I've known her since her freshman year and have observed her make excellent and mature decisions as she pursues her interests in language, culture and education."


At the University of Fribourg, Switzerland, for the second semester of her junior year, Walker studied in an environment where French and German are the languages of instruction. (Photo courtesy of Abidjan Walker, Class of 2015)
In her thesis, Walker explores how the main languages in Switzerland — French, German, Italian and Romansch — are used across the country's cantons (member states).

Regarding China and Morocco, she said "the situation becomes a little more complicated." 

Said Walker: "The Chinese government chose Standard Mandarin as the language of instruction, but there are many Chinese dialects. What are the implications for picking standard Mandarin?" She noted that China has some schools that cater to ethnic minorities, and that the influx of English is causing "more and more Chinese students" to apply to schools where English is the predominant language of instruction. 

"I'm also looking at history," said Walker, and the implications of French continuing to be a language of instruction in Morocco. "There is the question whether French should still really be in the education system," she said. "But others don't want only Arabic. Also, indigenous languages such as Amazigh, which in Morocco comprises four different languages — are gaining power."


Walker regularly meets with Sandra Bermann, her senior thesis adviser, shown above at Whitman College. Walker has had weekly meetings with Bermann, the Cotsen Professor of the Humanities and a professor of comparative literature, throughout her senior thesis year to discuss her project. Whitman College is home to Walker, who is a resident college adviser, and to Bermann, who is the college master. (Photo by Amaris Hardy, Office of Communications)
"I'm not saying any one is better than another," Walker said about her comparative study. "There's an opportunity for countries to learn from each other around the world."

In completing her thesis, Walker said she is "most proud of being able to bring my different languages together." She added, "I am also happy to have this culminating project at the end of my Princeton career that looks back on what I have studied."

She hopes other seniors will talk about their thesis experiences with fellow students. "It's a big deal, writing 80 to 100 pages. It's a great accomplishment, I think." 

Walker reinforces the benefits of studying abroad with her advisees at Whitman. "It's important," Walker said. "We are fortunate to have the opportunity to experience other cultures, learn another language. It's a big world out there." 

After she graduates, Walker plans to pursue an education-related fellowship overseas — "definitely overseas," she said. 


Through her experiences abroad, Walker increasingly knew she wanted to write about languages and education systems for her senior thesis. Along with studying in China, Morocco and Switzerland, she also spent a summer at an internship in Paris. [Enlarge] (Illustration by Andrew Matlack, Office of Communications)
 

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Italy Tops the List of Best Countries to Study Abroad - careerscabin

Italy Tops the List of Best Countries to Study Abroad - careerscabin | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Prepping for finals is never fun, but few things can propel students through the pain like an upcoming boat ride along a Venetian canal or a glass of wine in a Roman cafe. Italy is the best country to study abroad, at least according to nearly 6,000 millennials, or adults under age 35,  who filled …
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Enrollment From Abroad Sets Record at U.S. Colleges

Enrollment From Abroad Sets Record at U.S. Colleges | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
The number of international students enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities passed one million for the first time during 2015-16 academic year, nearly double the level of 10 years ago. But some U.S. schools worry about their ability to continue to dominate the global marketplace.
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Why Are Immigrants More Entrepreneurial?

Research shows cross-cultural experience may help people spot opportunities.
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Travel Tips: How You Need to Pack to Study Abroad

Cracking the Secret Code of Travel every Thursday. http://bit.ly/SoniasTravelsYT Sonia Gil shares her travel tips and shows you how to pack for travelin
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Italy Tops the List of Best Countries to Study Abroad - careerscabin

Italy Tops the List of Best Countries to Study Abroad - careerscabin | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Prepping for finals is never fun, but few things can propel students through the pain like an upcoming boat ride along a Venetian canal or a glass of wine in a Roman cafe. Italy is the best country to study abroad, at least according to nearly 6,000 millennials, or adults under age 35,  who filled …
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Studying Abroad in Spain - Travel Essentials Haul

I am studying abroad in Spain in Spring 2015 and just wanted to show you all which items I decided to take with me! The haul consists of mostly newl
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Revealed: The best places to raise a family, be an entrepreneur or retire, if you're a global butterfly

Revealed: The best places to raise a family, be an entrepreneur or retire, if you're a global butterfly | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Has Britain’
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Gap year ideas that will boost your career prospects

Gap year ideas that will boost your career prospects | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
Teaching overseas develops leadership & comm skills, shows independence & adaptability https://t.co/SOI39Ak9Wg https://t.co/OFBO0ZMyWZ
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Nevermind the Brochures — Here's Why You Should Really Study Abroad

Nevermind the Brochures — Here's Why You Should Really Study Abroad | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
The start of every college semester always brings with it the fun game of "guess which of your friends are going abroad!
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Top 200 universities in the world 2016: the global trends

Top 200 universities in the world 2016: the global trends | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
As the latest QS world university rankings are released, we take an overview of the results – and it looks like money talks
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30 cities that host the best universities in Europe

30 cities that host the best universities in Europe | Study Abroad | Scoop.it
The best universities in Europe don't just offer top-rate academics; they are also located in great cities to live and visit.
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Why Study Abroad Benefits Anyone: Top 30 Reasons

Why Study Abroad Benefits Anyone: Top 30 Reasons | Study Abroad | Scoop.it

Why study abroad? Because it could profit you in certain ways. OK let's count on your fingers, it could be your chance to travel the world, build relationships worldwide, learn a language, ... etc.


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