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Changing Our Mindset (Visual)

Changing Our Mindset (Visual) | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
Phil Turner's insight:

Learning experientially can be more or less painful ... depending on your mindset.  You can pick your mindset, and this checklist helps you reflect on what mode you are operating in.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 30, 2013 5:50 PM

This chart looks at the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset by looking at eight areas:

* Desire

* Evaluation of situations

* Dealing with setbacks

* Challenges

* Effort

* Criticism

* Success of others

* Result...

You may want to share this with students or other teachers at your school.

Intriguing Networks's curator insight, December 1, 2013 10:55 AM

Mindset can we use DH to shift user mindsets?

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Studentship and the Study Ethic
What is study? Why would I study? How do I study? Motivation, Inspiration, and rationalisation for the learner in each of us.
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Changing Our Mindset (Visual)

Changing Our Mindset (Visual) | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it

Via Beth Dichter
Phil Turner's insight:

Learning experientially can be more or less painful ... depending on your mindset.  You can pick your mindset, and this checklist helps you reflect on what mode you are operating in.

more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 30, 2013 5:50 PM

This chart looks at the difference between a fixed mindset and a growth mindset by looking at eight areas:

* Desire

* Evaluation of situations

* Dealing with setbacks

* Challenges

* Effort

* Criticism

* Success of others

* Result...

You may want to share this with students or other teachers at your school.

Intriguing Networks's curator insight, December 1, 2013 10:55 AM

Mindset can we use DH to shift user mindsets?

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The Best (and Worst) Study Habits | Visual.ly

The Best (and Worst) Study Habits | Visual.ly | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered why you do so well in certain classes or subjects and why you abysmally lousy at others? We all know we all learn differently a
Phil Turner's insight:

A starting place for students to think about themselves as students...

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A brief return to secondary school - Leinster Express

A brief return to secondary school - Leinster Express | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
Leinster Express
A brief return to secondary school
Leinster Express
What was amazing that over 60% of learners were unfamiliar with their own learning style – were they visual, aural, or read/write or tactile.
Phil Turner's insight:

Most learners know very little about how they learn.  A simple study of learning and our own performance, similar to the way athletes understand what they do and how they do it, would go a long way to improving learning outcomes.

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Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn

Smart Strategies That Help Students Learn How to Learn | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it

"What’s the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It’s not just what you know. It’s what you know about what you know.

To put it in more straightforward terms, anytime a student learns, he or she has to bring in two kinds of prior knowledge: knowledge about the subject at hand (say, mathematics or history) and knowledge about how learning works. Parents and educators are pretty good at imparting the first kind of knowledge. We’re comfortable talking about concrete information: names, dates, numbers, facts. But the guidance we offer on the act of learning itself—the “metacognitive” aspects of learning—is more hit-or-miss, and it shows."


Via Beth Dichter
Phil Turner's insight:

A question of study rather than memorising ... how a student of a topic goes about constructing meaning and negotiating understanding.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, October 7, 2013 10:41 PM

As teachers do we emphasize what we want students to learn, or do we focus on how they should go about learning and the necessary skills? This post focuses on these issues looking at current research. It also provides two sets of questions, one where "Students can assess their own awareness by asking themselves which of the following learning strategies they regularly use..." and the other "a series of proactive questions for teachers to drop into the lesson on a “just-in-time” basis—at the moments when students could use the prompting most."

Another great article by Annie Murphy Paul that provides much food for thought.

Mary Cunningham's curator insight, October 13, 2013 12:13 PM

This is a great article about ensuring that students understand the mechanics of their own learning.

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Zombie-Based Learning -- "Braaaaaaains!" | Edutopia

Zombie-Based Learning -- "Braaaaaaains!" | Edutopia | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
From PBL to ZBL, Edutopia blogger Andrew Miller explores a new twist to project-based learning: the pedagogical benefits of Zombies!
Phil Turner's insight:

Why not ... whatever it takes to build engagement.  Don't just 'see the movie', study the math/sociology/physics/... behind the things that you like.

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Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times - Huffington Post

Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times - Huffington Post | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
Connected Learning: A Learning Approach Designed for Our Times
Huffington Post
Between the years of 1992 and 2005, I spent a great deal of time confined to a desk learning the three Rs: reading, writing and arithmetic.
Phil Turner's insight:

Probably the ideal of authentic learning, but not very pragmatic for geographically situated large-group education (conventional schooling model).  The one-to-few instruction/guide model is more sustainable with modern technology (so that students situated 'here' learn from experts and friends anywhere, in virtual classes), but most school contexts can't immediately embrace this.

What we can learn from this is that effective learning occurs when there is authenticity and engagement.  When the student and the 'instructor' are both invested in the learning outcomes (not the content, not the process) then learning will be almost inevitable.

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The 5 Key Study Skills That Every Successful Student Knows

While many students lack some study skills and need to develop more, my experience as a tutor, study coach, and long-time student is that more study skills aren't the biggest need. Most students know and can do the basics ...
Phil Turner's insight:

There is truth in here, but it is obscured by the word "know".  Know this, know that ... if a student defines "know" as 'to be able to recall/define/etc.' then simplying knowing that these five principles are used by successful students is not enough.  Actually being an effective student, and understanding how, requires that these principles are made 'real' in your own life and that they have some meaning in your contexts.

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INDEPENDENT LEARNING - Study Skills Top Tips Parents

INDEPENDENT LEARNING - Study Skills Top Tips Parents | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
STUDY SKILLS TIP 34 – INDEPENDENT LEARNING. by psalter on November 1, 2012. Some students take a long time to realise that there are actually two types of work in secondary school. There is the obvious work, the work their teacher ...
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Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post

Howard Gardner: ‘Multiple intelligences’ are not ‘learning styles’ - Washington Post | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
The famed psychologist explains why one is not the other though they are often confused.

Via John Evans
Phil Turner's insight:

A short, sensible, way to appreciate the distinction and the role of the concepts in your teaching/learning practice

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Tom Hood's curator insight, October 19, 2013 11:35 AM

I am a fan of Gardner and his Five MInds for the Future. This new work is needed and I like the emphasis on designing learning to work with these multiple intelligences. In this world of rapid change and increasing complexity, learning is THE competitive advantage we can control. 

Ante Lauc's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:39 AM

For me the most important is moral and emotional intelligence, than cognitive and other that HG did discover.

Rhiannon Boyd's curator insight, November 18, 2013 8:33 PM

From the article: 

 "On the basis of research in several disciplines, including the study of how human capacities are represented in the brain, I developed the idea that each of us has a number of relatively independent mental faculties, which can be termed our “multiple intelligences.” The basic idea is simplicity itself. A belief in a single intelligence assumes that we have one central, all-purpose computer—and it determines how well we perform in every sector of life. In contrast, a belief in multiple intelligences assumes that we have a number of relatively autonomous computers—one that computes linguistic information, another spatial information, another musical information, another information about other people, and so on." - HG

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The Key To Learning: Knowing How Learning Works - TIME

The Key To Learning: Knowing How Learning Works - TIME | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
The Key To Learning: Knowing How Learning Works
TIME
What's the key to effective learning? One intriguing body of research suggests a rather riddle-like answer: It's not just what you know. It's what you know about what you know.
Phil Turner's insight:

"Study your craft" applies to learners as much as anyone else if they want to be good at it.  Some learners are 'lucky' and have a 'natural' talent/disposition/inclination, and others acquire a skill set because of circumstances (just like 'born' athletes and those grow up in athletic environments) but many of us need to focus on our skills in order to make significant progress.

 

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The 4 Keys to Learning From Failure - Huffington Post

The 4 Keys to Learning From Failure - Huffington Post | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
The 4 Keys to Learning From Failure
Huffington Post
The 4 Keys to Learning From Failure. Posted: 10/10/2013 8:46 am. Follow.
Phil Turner's insight:

If we don't make mistakes, are we really learning or are we just doing things we already know how to do?

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Study Skills Initiative: Perform a Semester Post-Mortem | JollyLibrarian

Study Skills Initiative: Perform a Semester Post-Mortem | JollyLibrarian | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
Study Skills Initiative: Perform a Semester Post-Mortem. Posted by: JollyLibrarian on: May 7, 2013. In: Uncategorized · Leave a Comment. Now that the semester's over, you may have dreams of television, sleep, and even the beach in front of ...
Phil Turner's insight:

Don't wait to the end of semester/course/life ... do this review weekly.  You need to monitor the effectiveness of your approach to learning so you can adapt as you go.

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On College: Knowing the fine line between helping and doing - San Jose Mercury News

On College: Knowing the fine line between helping and doing - San Jose Mercury News | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
On College: Knowing the fine line between helping and doing
San Jose Mercury News
While grades are a fundamental part of the admissions process, children are deprived of real learning when parents help by doing their work.
Phil Turner's insight:

Duh!?  I guess you would hope it was obvious that doing something for a student means that they miss out on most of the learning.  Generally the important lessons are not in the answers/product or how fast you can finish, but in mastering the process of reaching that answer/product reliably and accurately.  The process is important, and doing the process is the only way to master it.

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Software Company Anahata To Deliver Study Skills Mobile Web App - PRWeb - PR Web (press release)

Software Company Anahata To Deliver Study Skills Mobile Web App - PRWeb PR Web (press release) On Friday 10th May, 2013, Pablo Rodriguez Pina, founder and director of the Perth (Western Australia) based software company announced the company will...
Phil Turner's insight:

Apologies for picking on this company/app, but the comments apply to a lot of "study skills" systems - if your concept of learning involves understanding and meaningful learning, then flip charts and mnemonics are not about learning.  To promote things like this as pathways to learning is to mislead and effectively handicap learners.  Rote memorisation has a place in our lives, and being good at it is pretty cool, but it doesn't help you understand the world or anything in it. <end rant ... for now>

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Science Study Skills for Premedical Students - Thompson Advising

Science Study Skills for Premedical Students - Thompson Advising | Studentship and the Study Ethic | Scoop.it
At Johns Hopkins and Goucher, I helped non-science students transition to full immersion in science courses and I encouraged students to adopt study skills suitable to science. As a medical school admissions consultant I ...
Phil Turner's insight:

The aim of steps 1-4 should be to _make_ new notes - your notes, in your words, expressing your understanding rather than that of your teacher or the authors you are reading.  Steps 5 and 6 then are about revising and refining those notes.  Step 6, which is essentially about getting feedback (not just 'help'), should include conversations with peers as well as teacher support.

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