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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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How to take criticism well

How to take criticism well | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
No one likes getting criticism. But it can be a chance to show off a rare skill: responding to negative feedback well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 


Via Gust MEES
Lou Salza's insight:

Love the advice here--and the graphic is instructive. If the goal is better performance for our students, then we need to be willing to deal with feedback. Kids handle feedback all the time! What's good for the goslins is probably good for the goose and the gander as well!--Lou

Excerpt:

"....It is a skill that requires practice, humility and a sizable dose of self-awareness. But the ability to learn from criticism fuels creativity at work, studies show, and helps the free flow of valuable communication.

Tempering an emotional response can be hard, especially "if you're genuinely surprised and you're getting that flood of adrenaline and panic," says Douglas Stone, a lecturer at Harvard Law School and co-author of "Thanks for the Feedback...."


"....Some people distort feedback into a devastating personal critique. Mr. Stone suggests writing down: "What is this feedback about, and what is it not about?" Then, change your thinking by eliminating distorted thoughts. "The goal is to get the feedback back into the right-sized box" as a critique of specific aspects of your current performance, he says...

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Mark Dhamma's curator insight, June 29, 12:45 PM

Criticism is feedback, feedback improves performance- Embrace!

Eliane Fierro's curator insight, July 1, 12:20 AM

Embrace criticism!

Philip Powel Smith's curator insight, July 29, 8:04 AM

Criticism is always a difficult pro-active action that educators have to give. Criticism without ridicule and shame is what students need to hear and an explanation of how to make the changes to be better learners and communicators.

Rescooped by Lou Salza from Better teaching, more learning
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TY @knolinfos for 17 Free Digital Storytelling Apps for The iPad

TY @knolinfos for 17 Free Digital Storytelling Apps for The iPad | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

The iPad is such a boon in education. It is making a slow but steadfast revolution in the way instruction is  both  delivered and received. Teachers Simple Guide on The Use of iPad in Education clearly manifests this transfrmation and provides tips on how educators can leverage the power of this device in educational settings.


Via Gust MEES, Gianfranco D'Aversa
Lou Salza's insight:

Let's encourage all our kids to own and tell their stories! We begin by telling stories we learn from others, then we start making up our own. Next we tell our story to ourselves and those we love. When we construct the narrative of our journey we gain agency over our days, our experiences and our lives. Tell your 'own' story to 'own' your life! This is the very definition of self advocacy.--Lou 

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Rescooped by Lou Salza from iPads in Education
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The Padagogy Wheel

The Padagogy Wheel | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Shirley Moody, Gust MEES, GSeremetakis, Katharina Kulle, John Evans
Lou Salza's insight:

How cool is this??!!

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Simon Vuillaume's curator insight, April 29, 2013 5:58 PM

Ipadagogy... 

Deborah Banker's curator insight, May 12, 2013 2:03 PM

WOW!!  How cool is this?!

Louise Lewis's curator insight, September 20, 2013 8:34 PM

Perfect for our research into Web 2.0 tools that we may include in our webmixes

Rescooped by Lou Salza from Dyslexia, Literacy, and New-Media Literacy
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9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning

9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning

 

1. Learner-centered

2. Media-driven (this doesn’t have to mean digital media)

3. Personalized

4. Transfer-by-Design

5. Visibly Relevant

6. Data-Rich

7. Adaptable

8. Interdependent

9. Diverse

Read more:

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/9-characteristics-of-21st-century-learning/

 


Via Gust MEES, Carolyn D Cowen
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Ten Skills for the Future Workforce

Ten Skills for the Future Workforce | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Sense-making, social intelligence, novel & adaptive thinking, cross-cultural competency, computational thinking, new-media literacy, transdisciplarity, design mindset, cognitive load management, virtual collaboration. These are the 10 skills needed for the future workforce. For a full report, see the work done by Apollo Research Institute (formerly the University of Phoenix Research Institute) looking at the Skills Needed by 2020. A summary of the report and detailed findings about each of the skills are also available.

 

 


Via Marcia Conner, Richard Andrews, David Hain, donhornsby, Professor Jill Jameson, Gust MEES, Carolyn D Cowen
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How Visual Thinking Improves Writing

How Visual Thinking Improves Writing | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Encouraging kids to think in pictures and words can free up their creativity and language skills as they write.

Via Gust MEES
Lou Salza's insight:

This is particularly important for students with language learning differences--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...“There’s something about writing that is a link to your brain,” said Marissa Moss, author of the popular children’s book series Amelia’s Notebook. In the books, Moss takes on the persona of a little girl expressing her ideas about the world and people around her. The books are a combination of words and drawings and look free form – as though Amelia sketched them herself.

Taking a cue from Moss, teachers from Oak Knoll Elementary School in Menlo Park, Calif., decided to have their students keep notebooks in a similar style. The notebooks aren’t graded; rather, they’re a place of private, free expression. Karen Clancy and Andrea Boatright presented the project at the Innovative Learning Conference hosted by the Nueva School recently.

“They’re not used to being given permission to write about whatever they want,” Clancy said. But once her students realized that they really weren’t being graded and that they had freedom of expression, they eventually came to demand time to write.

Moss says writing without fear of consequences is key to developing a writer’s voice. “If you’re perfect you are guaranteed to not write a thing,” Moss said. “It’s like driving with one foot on the gas and one foot on the break.” She has developed some guides to help teachers coax students into using art and writing in their journals at the same time, as a way of flexing their visual thinking along with literacy...."

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Brad Ovenell-Carter's curator insight, November 28, 2013 10:20 AM

Totally agree. However, might we also encourage thinking in pictures for its own sake, that is to free up creativity and language skills--full stop. Print is not necessarily the ultimate or end-form of human communication. 

Audrey's curator insight, December 2, 2013 6:08 PM

Teachers and students already think this way. Audrey curating for homeschoolsource.co.uk

Tahar Mehenni's curator insight, December 3, 2013 5:13 AM

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skype: chatau1980

 

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Project Based Learning Checklist for Teachers

Project Based Learning Checklist for Teachers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES
Lou Salza's insight:

Concise, clear, questions to improve PBL experiences for teachers and students.--Lou

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jillyfrees's curator insight, May 6, 2013 3:15 AM

This ia a neat checklist to assess whether the project you set is worth the effort.

Michelle Gohagon's curator insight, May 14, 2013 1:45 PM

Great checklist for project-based learning

KiwiBelma's curator insight, August 18, 2013 6:16 PM

Just to remind myself :-)

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Growing Gap Between What Business Needs and What Education Provides - Forbes

Growing Gap Between What Business Needs and What Education Provides - Forbes | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

McKinsey just published a groundbreaking study of the impact of education on employment (“Education to Employment“), and it demonstrates the challenging mismatch between our educational system and the job skills employers need.

 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Gust MEES, Lynnette Van Dyke
Lou Salza's insight:

1. The paradox of high unemployment and a war for talent continues.

We don’t have a jobs crisis in the world, we have a skills crisis. Some clear evidence from this report.

45% of US employers say lack of skills is the “main reason” for entry-level vacanciesOnly 42% of worldwide employers believe new graduates are adequately prepared for work.

This data echoes the data we hear regularly from clients. Companies need to invest heavily in internal development programs to stay competitive. Our research shows that the training industry grew by 12% this year, the highest level in 9 years.

This research also shows that employers would be willing to pay new workers 22% higher salaries if they did have the skills they need. Employers want “ready made” employees.

2. Worldwide educational institutions are out of sync with employer needs.

While 42% of employers believe newly educated workers are ready for work, 72% of educational institutions do. This is an enormous mis-match. Primary and secondary educational institutions are not keeping in touch with corporate recruiters and the needs of business.

Again our research validates this completely. Most of our clients are investing heavily in new corporate universities, onboarding programs, and what we call “continuous learning” programs. In fact the L&D industry is in the middle of a renaissance, as companies try to reinvent all types of training around new internet technologies.

3. Students don’t perceive that traditional education methods drive job skills.

The #1 cited way (60%) students believe they learn skills is through “on the job training.” (Our reserach shows that 72% of business managers say the same thing.) 58% cite that “hands-on learning” is best.

Lectures are the lowest rated learning method (30%) tied with “traditional online learning” (30%).

Unfortunately most colleges still rely heavily on lectures and the “for-profit” distance learning institutions rely heavily on “traditional online learning.” (Only 24% of academic program graduates say that they use hands-on learning in their program.)

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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 16, 2013 1:02 PM

3. Educational institutions around the world are not keeping up with teaching styles and general skill needs of the 21st century workforce. This is a very complex problem to fix, but at least the issues are on the table. Educationproviders and leaders have to visit corporate recruiters and learn about the needs of business.

 

LLatipi's curator insight, February 16, 2013 8:05 PM

Simply said, this is a great article!

Allan Shaw's curator insight, February 17, 2013 12:38 AM

Perhaps our time, the here and now is redolent of times gone past where education had to face significant public criticism and attempt significant adjustments. The early 20th sentury in the USA was such a time.  Educators need to lead from a firm values base and in line with what is best for students.

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On the differences between literacies, skills and competencies

On the differences between literacies, skills and competencies | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The differences between literacies, skills and competencies shouldn’t merely be glossed over and ignored. These differences are important.

 

Literacies

Literacy is the ability to read and write. Traditionally, this has meant the ability to read and write using paper as the mediating technology. However, we now have many and varied technologies requiring us to ‘read’ and ‘write’ in different ways. As a result we need multiple literacies.

Because literacy depends upon context and particular mediating technologies there is, to my mind, no one literacy to ‘rule them all’. Literacy is a condition, not a threshold.

Skills

A skill is a controlled activity (such as a physical action) that an individual has learned to perform. There are general skills (often called transferable skills) as well as domain-specific skills.

Skills are subject to objective thresholds. So, for example, badges awarded by Scouting organisations signify the reaching of a pre-determined level of skill in a particular field.

Competencies

A competence is a collection of skills for a pre-defined purpose. Often the individual with the bundle of skills being observed or assessed has not defined the criteria by which he or she is deemed to be ‘competent’.

Competencies have the semblance of objectivity but are dependent upon subjective judgements by another human being (or beings) who observe knowledge, skills and behaviours.

 

Read more,

http://dougbelshaw.com/blog/2012/07/12/on-the-important-differences-between-literacies-skills-and-competencies/#.UAKMPo5aRjs

 


Via Gust MEES
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