Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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http://www.brainpickings.org/ A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell on the Ten Commandments of Teaching

http://www.brainpickings.org/ A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell on the Ten Commandments of Teaching | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 http://www.brainpickings.org/ Interestingness, curated – picking culture's collective brain for innovation, inspiration & brilliant ideas...

A Liberal Decalogue: Bertrand Russell on the Ten Commandments of Teaching

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How to Download e-books from the Public Library on the iPad | PadGadget

How to Download e-books from the Public Library on the iPad | PadGadget | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Have you checked out a book from your public library and read it on your iPad yet? You didn’t know you could do that?

Step one: get a library card and sign up for an online borrowing PIN. Don’t limit yourself to the local branch of your public library. Often big library systems including the New York Public Library and the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County will issue library cards to anyone who pays taxes in their state, even if the patron never plans to enter a library branch. If your local library doesn’t offer e-books, or even if you just want to access a larger selection of titles, find the largest library in your state and try to get a library card from that system. Most library systems can guide a new user through the registration process.

Step two: download Overdrive Media’s iOS app. Overdrive Media is an Ohio-based company that manages digital lending for 15,000 library systems. Overdrive’s holdings comprise 650,000 premium digital titles from more than 1,000 publishers, including Random House, HarperCollins, BBC Audiobooks America, Harlequin, and Bloomsbury. (Note: Overdrive can only let you borrow titles that your library owns.)

Step three: get an Adobe Id. The Adobe ID is free, and you can sign up from within Overdrive by tapping settings. Make a note of your Adobe ID because you will need it if you want to read a borrowed e-book on more than one device (e.g. iPad and iPhone or iPad and Kindle).

Step four: get books. The app opens to your bookshelf. This is where your digital titles will be stored. Tap the Get Books+ button in Overdrive’s upper right-hand corner. Tap the Add a Library bar to open up the app’s search function to search or browse for libraries. When you find the library you want to borrow from, tap the name of the library. A new page in the app opens that shows what type of digital content (e.g. audiobooks, e-books) the library lends. Tap the star next to the name of the library to save it as a source for future downloads.


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Protect our best teachers in the city schools

Protect our best teachers in the city schools | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Foundation leaders share ideas for school reform.

At a public hearing Monday, Pittsburgh Public School board members were riveted by the story of a boy we will call Brian, a first-grader at Faison Elementary, a historically low-performing elementary school in Homewood. Beaten down by a perfect storm of obstacles, Brian had behavior problems and low self-esteem that put him on a depressing downward slide. The system labeled him "special needs," a designation that carries tremendous future costs -- primarily for the child, but also for taxpayers.

Brian's teacher, Keisha Jones, refused to be distracted by his acting out, her principal, LouAnn Zwieryznski, told the board. "She would not accept 'I don't care.' She would not accept 'I won't learn because nobody cares.'

"She worked to challenge him academically ... would not let him alone," Ms. Zwieryznski said. "And he is now in the gifted program instead of special education."

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Portrait of the artist: Angie Le Mar, comedian

Portrait of the artist: Angie Le Mar, comedian | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Angie Le Mar, comedian: What got you started?

Being dyslexic. I trained as an actor, but because of my dyslexia I have great trouble sight-reading. So I kept going to auditions and not getting the roles. Then one day I went to a comedy club and asked if I could tell some jokes. It was 27 years ago, when there were no black British female standups. I became the first.

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Learning Ally, formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Learning Ally, formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Since starting to use Learning Ally’s audiobooks last March, Kelly went from not reading at all, to reading nine books, in addition to all the texts required for her curriculum. “It’s totally amazing. I love that I can go on, look through the books, and download it to my iPad. I no longer have that big tape player. I can take it with me.” She looks forward to listening to all the classics that she was unable to read before, such as “Little Women” and “Pride and Prejudice.” Kelly has also taken full advantage of Learning Ally’s book request system, having already sent in nine books she wants recorded and receiving audio formats of the first three. She says having this newfound access has changed her outlook and level of confidence: “Going from thinking about what you can’t do, to seeing what you can do is amazing.”

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50 minute video, The City Club Forum- Mario Morino: Relentless: Investing in Leaders

50 minute video, The City Club Forum- Mario Morino: Relentless: Investing in Leaders | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Relentless: Investing in Leaders who Stop at Nothing in Pursuit of Greater Social Impact..

"The magnitude of the combined hits—greatly reduced funding and increased need—will require many organizations to literally reinvent themselves. Even the most accomplished leaders will need to raise the quality of their services while lowering the cost and serving more people.

Nonprofit and public-sector leaders can’t do it on their own. Funders, too, will need to rethink and reinvent for our new societal and economic realities. They will need to do much more to encourage and support courageous leaders and help them build high-performing institutions. And they will need to allocate their resources based on reason and merit rather than feel-good stories, blind loyalty, or faith.

In the midst of dramatic structural shifts, our society will only be as strong and successful as our institutions, and they will only be as successful as the talent that leads them.."

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Oklahoma House approves dyslexia training pilot program

Oklahoma House approves dyslexia training pilot program | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Rep. Ann Coody, R-Lawton, presented the amended version of her SB 1565, also by Sen. Susan Paddack, D-Ada. In response to questions about the funding for the program, Coody said the establishment of the pilot program is contingent on available funds. She also responded to questions regarding the need for such training. Coody said that some teacher candidates are not taught how to address students with dyslexia.
The bill passed 81 to 9 and now returns to the Senate.
The House will reconvene at 2 p.m. Go to <www.ecapitol.net> for the full story!

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“Our survival is on the line.” – Mario Morino’s Cleveland Keynote « Community Wealth Ventures

“Our survival is on the line.” – Mario Morino’s Cleveland Keynote « Community Wealth Ventures | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Characteristically, Mario had concrete recommendations for what can be done to address these issues, including the need for funders to do more than programmatic funding, to break their fixation on overhead ratios, and invest in great leaders. Most memorable of all though was his sense of urgency. As someone who “grew up poor, but just didn't know it” every word of his speech was imbued with the conviction that the lives of children are at stake in our willingness to rethink the work of the nonprofit and the public sector. “The challenge for all of us is to determine whether our hard work is adding up to the kind of opportunities that I had … that you had …that every parent here wants for his or her own children.”

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6 Breakthrough Charter Schools play central role in Cleveland school district's plans (gallery)

6 Breakthrough Charter Schools play central role in Cleveland school district's plans (gallery) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Charter schools were once the bad guys in the minds of school district officials, who considered them a horde of profiteers out to pillage students and dollars from traditional public schools.
Not anymore. At least not when it comes to the Cleveland school district and its chosen charter partner, Breakthrough Schools.
The group of six charter schools is the district's model for a new educational order in Cleveland, one where the district sponsors new charters to help provide quality options for parents, creates partnerships with other successful charters and eventually shares property tax money with them.
It's a model the Cleveland school district has been edging toward over the last several years and that will accelerate under the schools plan that district chief Eric Gordon and Mayor Frank Jackson have proposed to the state legislature.

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Thank you @anniemurphypaul for What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

Thank you @anniemurphypaul for What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple University in Philadelphia propose that it be taught earlier, however—much earlier. As in first grade.


~Via Annie Murphy Paul


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Seven Brain Based Learning Principles

Seven Brain Based Learning Principles | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The brain needs to make patterns and associations in order for new material to make sense. 2. Humor decreases stress and increases learning speed. 3. The working memory can hold 2 to 4 chunks of information at a time, usually in about 4 - 8 minutes. After that, the brain needs time to process, reflect and review in order for those chunks to move to the long term memory. 4. Music boosts brain organization and ability. It affects our moods and emotions. Music goes hand in hand with math. 5. The brain is a parallel processor. It needs to activate more than one process at a time. This is why lecture-type teaching doesn't work. Try combinations, such as listening and moving or watching and listening. 6. Practice does NOT make "perfect". Practice with appropriate feedback makes "better". Feedbackshould be honest and immediate, if possible. 7. If children are engaged cognitively, physically, emotionally and socially, learning will happen.


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Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain, larger hippocampus

Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain, larger hippocampus | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Exercise seems to slow or reverse the brain’s physical decay, much as it does with muscles. Although scientists thought until recently that humans were born with a certain number of brain cells and would never generate more, they now know better. In the 1990s, using a technique that marks newborn cells, researchers determined during autopsies that adult human brains contained quite a few new neurons. Fresh cells were especially prevalent in the hippocampus, indicating that neurogenesis — or the creation of new brain cells — was primarily occurring there. Even more heartening, scientists found that exercise jump-starts neurogenesis. Mice and rats that ran for a few weeks generally had about twice as many new neurons in their hippocampi as sedentary animals. Their brains, like other muscles, were bulking up...."


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Kay Shames Director at CSU's Center for Arts and Innovation: 10 Minutes With ...

Kay Shames Director at CSU's Center for Arts and Innovation: 10 Minutes With ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
"The [Creative Voices Summit and Arts Education Day Summit] is an annual one-day, two-part event. The morning session, produced in partnership with Ideastream, studies creativity across the disciplines. Last year the topic was Arts and Politics. This year we will be taking an unconventional look at The Creative Mind. . . . At noon the Arts Education Luncheon, held on the State Theatre stage at PlayhouseSquare, features student performances showing arts education in action. . . . This year's speaker is the actor Ben Vereen. Previous speakers have included Rosie Perez, Michael York, LeVar Burton, Richard Dreyfuss, Harry Belafonte, and even football great Lynn Swann, who talked about the role that ballet played in his career. It's a great coming-together of the cultural, educational and civic communities. Check it out at csuohio.edu/cai.continue to be fascinated with showcasing creativity across the disciplines.
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Asking "why" you want iPads is a critical question... - iPads in Education

Asking "why" you want iPads is a critical question... - iPads in Education | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"In his book "Start with Why" and the accompanying TED talk, author Simon Sinek claims that we're all very clear about “what” we do. In fact, you often define yourself by what you do - "I'm a teacher" for example. You focus heavily on "how" you should do whatever it is you do and usually develop a routine to make it easier."

Simply purchasing and using technology to address questions of "how" we teach won't advance education. If we use technology to reinforce the same age-old educational processes then why bother? Some examples:
We often use technology to project a document or post it online instead of handing it out.
We still have students read a chapter and answer the questions at the end but now they can use technology to submit typed responses. In some cases, they can even submit them online.
We can continue to demand that students memorize facts for a test and use tools such as flashcard apps to help drill the facts.
We still lecture from the front of the room but now we have a digital whiteboard to enhance the process.

The fundamental processes haven't changed. Asking "why" and looking outside the walls of our schools may lead us to different visions and new directions.
Why only focus on text for exchanging information when the world now communicates with a variety of multimedia and media fluency is a valuable skill in the workplace?
Why continue using the same old textbooks when we can access updated information on any topic within seconds using the internet or digital books?
Why focus on static, delivery and memorization of educational content when that content pool is growing at unprecedented speeds and it's clearly more important for students to be skilled in finding, analyzing and using information as they need it?


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New Book by Harvard's Tony Wagner Praises Olin as Model of Educational Innovation

New Book by Harvard's Tony Wagner Praises Olin as Model of Educational Innovation | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A new book by Tony Wagner, a Harvard authority on educational change and leadership, includes a chapter holding up Olin College of Engineering as a model for innovation in higher education.

 

The book, Creating Innovators: The Making of Young People Who Will Change the World (Scribner, April 2012), is by Tony Wagner, co-director of the Change Leadership Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. The just-released volume explores what parents, teachers and employers must do to develop the capacities of young people to become innovators.
The book profiles compelling young American innovators such as Kirk Phelps, product manager for Apple's first iPhone, and Jodie Wu, who founded a company that builds bicycle-powered maize shellers in Tanzania. Wagner reveals how the adults in their lives nurtured their creativity and sparked their imaginations, while teaching them to learn from failures and persevere.
Wagner identifies a pattern—a childhood of creative play leads to deep-seated interests, which in adolescence and adulthood blossom into a deeper purpose for career and life goals. Play, passion and purpose are the forces that drive young innovators, according to Wagner. He shows how educators can apply this knowledge and what parents can do to compensate for poor schooling.

Read more: http://www.timesunion.com/business/press-releases/article/New-Book-by-Harvard-Educator-Praises-Olin-as-3524403.php#ixzz1tjhQbjT0

 

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Redefining, Reinventing, and Rebuilding Schools for our students' future: 21st Century literacies

Redefining, Reinventing, and Rebuilding Schools for our students' future: 21st Century literacies | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
So what is really important and what will prepare students for 21st century success? The Partners for 21st Century Learning identified several 21st century literacies that should be incorporated into the school curricula: financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial, civic, global awareness, health, and environmental (see Figure 1).

As a school, audit your curriculum. Does it authentically reflect these 21st century exigencies? If not, it is time to ascertain it does. First, determine how course content could be adapted to 21st century literacies. Identify where each of these literacies could be integrated and complement existing courses. Second, in order to potentially alleviate the curricular overload per subject, decide how some topics can be thematically bundled. Third, instead of eliminating electives, add them. In order to decide which ones to add, determine which ones will accommodate student interests and career needs, emulate 21st century literacies, and reflect future occupational demands. According to Wagner, the top future professions in 2030 are robotician, smart car designer, global system architect, global sourcing manager, clone rancher, chef-farmer, bio-regenerative integrator, seed capitalist, personal brand manager, mobile biomass therapist, bio0biotic physician, and alternative currency banker [2]. In 2020, Webley alleges the top future jobs will be vertical farming, patent lawyers, sustainability experts, genetic counselors, elderly care professionals, cyber security specialist, and statisticians [3]. Thomas and Kelley project the top careers for 2014 include network systems and data communication analysts and administrators, physician assistants, computer software engineers, medical scientists, physical and occupational therapists, and college instructors [4]. Does the curriculum offering courses in these fields to better prepare students a productive and germane role in society? If not, perhaps they should.....


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The Bilingual Brain Is Sharper and More Focused, Study Says - Wall Street Journal (blog)

The Bilingual Brain Is Sharper and More Focused, Study Says - Wall Street Journal (blog) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Bilingual Brain Is Sharper and More Focused, Study SaysWall Street Journal (blog)Scientists have long suspected that some enhanced mental abilities might be tied to structural differences in brain networks shaped by learning more than one language,...
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TY @Ryan_Masa for BishopBlog:Time 4 neuro-imaging & Proceedings of National Acad. Sci. to clean up its act

TY @Ryan_Masa for BishopBlog:Time 4 neuro-imaging & Proceedings of National Acad. Sci.  to clean up its act | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"There are rumblings in the jungle of neuroscience. There’s been a recent spate of high-profile papers that have drawn attention to methodological shortcomings in neuroimaging studies (e.g., Ioannidis, 2011; Kriegeskorte et al., 2009; Nieuwenhuis et al, 2011) . This is in response to published papers that regularly flout methodological standards that have been established for years. I’ve recently been reviewing the literature on brain imaging in relation to intervention for language impairments and came across this example......

How is it that this paper has been so influential? I suggest that it is largely because of the image below, summarising results from the study. This was reproduced in a review paper by the senior author that appeared in Science in 2009. This has already had 42 citations. The image is so compelling that it’s also been used in promotional material for a commercial training program other than the one that was used in the study. As McCabe and Castel (2008) have noted, a picture of a brain seems to make people suspend normal judgement."

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How to Help a Child with Weak Working Memory

How to Help a Child with Weak Working Memory | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Know your child's strengths and weaknesses. As a parent, you want to support your children any way you can. Knowing their strengths and weaknesses can make a big difference, says Tracy Packiam Alloway, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida.

She says that sometimes teachers tell their students with dyslexia to just keep repeating the information over and over to themselves. "But this will be hard to do for students with dyslexia who have a verbal working memory problem," says Alloway. "It's really better to target their strengths -- to try to use visual aids to support their learning, for example."

H. Lee Swanson, Ph.D., distinguished professor of education with the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside, agrees. Use your child's preferred way of processing information. For a child whose visual-spatial skills are strong, he suggests taking information from a math word problem and inserting it into a visual diagram. This uses a strength to help solve a problem.NCLD (RT @DrSelz: Helping kids with active working memory issues : http://t.co/CytcUrrm #dyslexia #LD #ADHD...)...

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Advocacy: New Dyslexia Awareness Group Joins Mushrooming Grassroots Movements' Push for Policy Change

Advocacy: New Dyslexia Awareness Group Joins Mushrooming Grassroots Movements' Push for Policy Change | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In numerous locations across the country parents are gathering together to raise dyslexia awareness and push for policy changes for the thousands of children who are struggling with dyslexia.

Decoding Dyslexia-NJ (DD-NJ), a brand new dyslexia awareness grassroots movement, is part of a remarkable national wave of parent-driven energy that is sparking awareness and pushing hard for public policy changes for children who struggle with dyslexia. DD-NJ is a grassroots movement driven by New Jersey parents of children with dyslexia who want to empower other parents, educate the public, and persuade policymakers to change the State’s educational system.
With just a mere five months since DD-NJ’s first formal meeting in Mercer County, NJ, they already discussed dyslexia with eight different State representatives and two USA Federal representatives. Reason enough for Hans Dekkers, CEO of Dynaread Special Education Corporation, a dyslexia remediation company, to interview Liz Barnes, a founding member of the DD-NJ parent group.

Read more: http://www.seattlepi.com/business/press-releases/article/New-Dyslexia-Awareness-Group-Joins-Mushrooming-3520345.php#ixzz1tdBSSfvD

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Different schools for different learners: Eton Academy alumni encourage students to overcome 'differences'

Different schools for different learners: Eton Academy alumni encourage students to overcome 'differences' | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Eton Academy students don’t let learning disabilities get in the way of their hopes of going to college.

In fact, they and school officials often refer to learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, as learning “differences.”

Returning alumni credit the Eton program for teaching them how to overcome their differences, be accepted at a college and go on to a successful career.

Since 1986, almost all of Eton’s graduates have gone on to higher education, compared to 14 percent of similar students nationwide, according to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, a statistic cited by Dawn Frasa, Eton’s spokeswoman......"

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MIT Discovers the Location of Memories: Individual Neurons| The Committed Sardine

MIT Discovers the Location of Memories: Individual Neurons| The Committed Sardine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The main significance here is that we finally have proof that memories (engrams, in neuropsychology speak) are physical rather than conceptual. We now know that, as in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, specific memories could be erased. It also gives us further insight into degenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders, which are mostly caused by the (faulty) interaction of neurons. “The more we know about the moving pieces that make up our brains,” says Steve Ramirez, co-author of the paper. “The better equipped we are to figure out what happens when brain pieces break down.”


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Excellent classroom advice: Seven Brain Based Learning Principles

Excellent classroom advice: Seven Brain Based Learning Principles | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

1. Talking! Research has taught us that learners don't learn much from sitting and listening. Sure, they need to listen a bit, but they need the opportunity to talk! The talking internalizes what they've learned. In my classroom, I'll give the children a few tidbits of information, then they have "turn and talk" time, where they discuss what they've learned. They love this, and it works! 2. Emotions rule! If you think about the strong memories you have from your past, I'll bet they are closely related to strong emotional experiences, both positive or negative: your wedding, your child being born, a death... strong emotions. This works with children, too! Hopefully, your teaching won't bring out too many negative emotions, but there are ways to get to the positive ones! Kids love games. Some children are very competitive, and thrive on that stuff! Getting up in front of their classmates brings out plenty of emotions. Of course, different kids feel different things, so just be careful about playing with the emotions of children. What works for one might traumatize another. (Yikes, don't want to go there!) 3. Visuals! Vision is the strongest of the senses. Talking alone isn't enough. Make sure the children have plenty to look at in addition to what you say. Use posters, drawings, videos, pictures, and even some guided imagery with the children to help them learn. 4. Chunking! The typical attention span is the child's age plus or minus a couple of minutes. That means that many of my second graders can't attend past 5 minutes. Again, proof that typical "lecture" type teaching just doesn't work. That means they need a chunk of information, then an opportunity to process that in some way. Here's where "turn and talk" works, as well as an opportunity to write, draw, or even move. 5. Movement! Combining movement with the learning almost guarantees stronger learning. Here are some ideas: Counting by tens while doing jumping jacks, touch three desks while naming the three states of matter, and this one, from a blog post I wrote in the fall. 6. Shake it up! If you do exactly the same thing, exactly the same way, it becomes boring and the brain tunes out. Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of good things about sticking with a routine, but once in a while you need to shake it up! Have a backwards day, turning the whole schedule around (within reason, of course!) change the seating arrangement, do one part of the day completely different. We need this in our own lives, too, don't we? 7. The brain needs oxygen! They say 20% of all the oxygen used in the body is used by the brain. That means we need to get the kids up out of their seats regularly and moving!

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What is Working Memory and Why Does it Matter?

What is Working Memory and Why Does it Matter? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Working memory is your brain's Post-it note, says Tracy Packiam Alloway, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida. "It makes all the difference to successful learning," she says.

You can think of working memory as the active part of your memory system. It's like mental juggling, says H. Lee Swanson, Ph.D., distinguished professor of education with the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside. "As information comes in, you're processing it at the same time as you store it," he says. A child uses this skill when doing math calculations or listening to a story, for example. She has to hold onto the numbers while working with them. Or, she needs to remember the sequence of events and also think of what the story is about, says Swanson.If working memory is weak, it can trip up just about anyone. But it really works against a child with learning disabilities (LD). You can take steps to help a child with weak working memory, whether or not LD is a part of the picture.


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enrique rubio royo's curator insight, January 5, 2013 4:36 PM

Importancia de la memoria de trabajo a la hora de aprender...

 

"Tracy Packiam Alloway: working memory is a better test of ability than IQ"

 

Automated Working Memory Assessment (AWMA) vs IQ (coeficiente de inteligencial).

 

Otras referencias de interés...Making, Playing, Learning and Working Memory (http://classroom-aid.com/2012/12/17/making-playing-learning-and-working-memory/); How does working memory work in the classroom? (How does working memory work in the classroom?); working memory | Tumblr http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/working%20memory); ...

 

muy interesante en cuanto a las funciones ejecutivas y redes cerebrales asociadas (UDL).

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Breakthrough technology for the hearing impaired:: Middle ear microphone improves cochlear implants...

Breakthrough technology for the hearing impaired:: Middle ear microphone improves cochlear implants... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
U.S researchers are developing a tiny middle ear "microphone" that could remove the need for any external components on cochlear implants.

Led by University of Utah engineer Darrin J. Young, the research team has produced and tested a prototype of the device which uses an accelerometer attached to the tiny bones of the middle ear to detect sound vibration....

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