Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Gov. Bryant shares own story of struggles with dyslexia

Gov. Bryant shares own story of struggles with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant signed a bill Wednesday that requires kindergartners or first-graders to be tested for dyslexia, a reading disorder that can sometimes go undiagnosed for years and leave children struggling to learn.The matter is intensely personal for Bryant. He was in fourth grade before a caring teacher discovered that dyslexia was the reason he saw scrambled words and had trouble putting the right sounds with letters that appeared in print.

"I repeated the third grade. What a difficult, horrible experience that was for a young child," Bryant, 57, recalled during a bill signing ceremony in his Capitol office.

On display was a small framed photograph of Josephine Henley, the fourth- grade teacher who helped him at south Jackson's Marshall Elementary School.

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Jackson, MS: Bryant signs laws on dyslexia, school ratings and veteran's IDs

Jackson, MS: Bryant signs laws on dyslexia, school ratings and veteran's IDs | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
JACKSON, MS (WLBT) -
Flanked by supporters of the respective new laws, Governor Phil Bryant sealed with his signature what he calls important steps in combating an educational obstacle.

"I believe this is some of the most significant legislation that we've had for education in many, many years," said Bryant.

Two pieces of legislation are aimed at increasing services for students with dyslexia. The first sets up a scholarship program for college students who wish to pursue a master's degree in dyslexia therapy.

"Hundreds of thousands of students are out there struggling with this," said Bryant.

The other bill establishes screening guidelines for kindergarten and first grade students and allows first through sixth graders with dyslexia to attend schools with dyslexia-specific instruction. One such school is in Petal, known as the 3D School, led by executive director Cena Holifield.

"Dyslexia affects ten to fifteen percent and we do not have enough therapists in the state to meet the needs of these children and we don't have enough programs in our schools," said Holifield.

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LEARNING FOR EACH OTHER | To be an adult with dyslexia is often a very isolating experience °

LEARNING FOR EACH OTHER | To be an adult with dyslexia is often a very isolating experience ° | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

To be an adult with dyslexia is often a very isolating experience. Once people finish their formal education, there is no longer a support structure outside of the family. To counter this isolation, two and a half years ago, a group of adults with dyslexia and similar language based learning differences began meeting to explore the relationship between their dyslexia and professional success by sharing compensating strategies and discussing the ways we have been able to advance in our careers. The group – “Professionals with Dyslexia” – has evolved and plays different roles for participants. Some people who attend the meetings have developed mentoring relationships, others have been inspired to go back to school, and some simply enjoy the opportunity to discuss our shared experience. Participants range in age and backgrounds from recent college graduates just entering the workforce to retirees, and include teachers, accountants, artists, lawyers, entrepreneurs and scientists. What we continue to learn from each other is that our dyslexia has many positive impacts.

On the evening of Thursday, June 7, 2012, Steven Walker, President and CEO of New England Wood Pellet will speak about how his dyslexia contributed to ability to build a tremendously successful company at the forefront of the biomass energy industry. Mr. Walker was featured in the recent HBO documentary Journey Into Dyslexia. For more information click here or contact mabidaevent@seyfarth.com.

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Like an audible Instapaper, SpokenLayer lets you listen to the Web

Like an audible Instapaper, SpokenLayer lets you listen to the Web | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Plenty of startups give you new and different ways to read content on the Web, but NY-based SpokenLayer wants to give you a way to hear it.

Launched Monday as an iPhone app, SpokenLayer takes text articles online and either gives them to a human to read and record, or it uses text-to-speech synthesis to meet instant demand in a matter of seconds.

Founder and CEO Will Mayo said he created the app to address his own difficulties growing up with dyslexia.

“It was a real problem for me,” he said. “I could never learn by reading. I had to learn by listening.” Access to audible versions of books and textbooks, he added, helped him get through college and complete a graduate degree in engineering.

On stage at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in New York, he announced the app’s launch, as well as partnerships with publishers including The Atlantic, National Journal, TechCrunch and Endgadget. Later, he told me that he’s also been in touch with the International Dyslexia Association and a major K-12 publisher about applying it in educational contexts.

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Free Early Learning Resources: Get Ready to Read!- National Center for Learning Disabilities

Free Early Learning Resources: Get Ready to Read!- National Center for Learning Disabilities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Get Ready to Read! is designed to support educators, parents, and young children in the development of early literacy skills in the years before kindergarten. Intended for use with all children, the resources and information provided on this site promote skill-building, communication between adults, and ways to address concerns.

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The Top Apps for Learners who Struggle with Text!

The Top Apps for Learners who Struggle with Text! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Paul Hamilton lists the top apps for students who struggle with text. Just 13 more ways to level the playing field!

 

> Paperport:  Note-taking app with audio and voice recognition

> Text Grabber:  Turn hard copy to readable PDF

> Cloudon:  Do equations and other math on the iPad

> Type on PDF:  Complete tests on the iPad; import PDF's form Dropbox

> Abilipad:  Word prediction with TTS

> Nebulous Notes:  Text editor; integrates with DropBox

> AudioNote:  Combine typed and handwritten notes with built in mic to record voice.

> Dragon Dictation:  Easy to use voice recognition; use "Speak Selection" to read dictated work.

> vBookz PDF Voice Reader:  TTS for reading PDF files

> GoodReader:  Offers TTS for text files; works with DropBox

> Idea Sketch: Create mind map and turn it into an outline.

> Book Creator: Create and share multimedia projects on the iPad

> Side by Side:  Split iPad screen into up to customizable "windows"

 

 


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Skater Amanda Evora found her voice on the ice: dyslexia made communication difficult

Skater Amanda Evora found her voice on the ice: dyslexia made communication difficult | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It took Amanda Evora a little while to find her voice.

When the 6-year-old first strapped her older sister’s pair of skates, she was still at the early end of years’ worth of classes to deal with dyslexia that made communication difficult and caused her father to push her toward more individual sports.

Yet here she is, speaking tonight at The News-Press All-Area Stars Banquet two decades later as an accomplished figure skater fresh off of her first Olympic appearance.

“When you make it to the Olympics, you never realize the other opportunities that come with it,” said Evora, 27, who is back at home in Bradenton. “It gives you a voice that people will listen to. It’s quite interesting, because I never really felt comfortable with public speaking.

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Q&A: Early detection and treatment of dyslexia | Washington Examiner

Q&A: Early detection and treatment of dyslexia | Washington Examiner | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Not long ago, the conventional wisdom about testing a child for reading problems was to wait until second grade (age 8), because that's when reading skills get up to speed -- or not -- and when dyslexia could be diagnosed.

Things have changed. Studies show it's possible to identify children as young as 3 who are at risk for dyslexia, and the chance of a child succeeding is much greater if he or she receives early treatment! Simple visual attention tasks that ask a child to pick out certain symbols and filter relevant from irrelevant information can indicate processing problems. And MRIs can help confirm a diagnosis by identifying differences in brain activity in regions that detect and discriminate between speech sounds, which seem to be precursors to reading problems.

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Richard Branson's Dyslexia | Famous People With DyslexiaThe Power Of Dyslexia

Richard Branson's Dyslexia | Famous People With DyslexiaThe Power Of Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Richard Branson left school at 15 years old. Because of his Dyslexia school could not hold his interest. Having brilliant ideas and seeing where there were needs in the market? He was much more suited to that. Despite his Dyslexia, he started a student news publication at 17. This publication was marketed to different schools, but the students would be the focus, not the schools themselves. Branson got the genius idea to sell advertising. Major companies bought advertising space in this student publication, and with some help from his mother the newspaper was launched.

Branson had a gift for seeing holes in the market and the ambition to fill them. He was a person who would never be held back by anything. Fighting through his challenges in school seemed to have given him the ability to either move an obstacle out of his way or simply go around it. He saw a need for records students could afford, and he started a small mail order delivery system. The response was even larger than he could have imagined. He got so many orders he needed a physical store to handle everything. The store was a tiny little shop called Virgin Records. The first months rent was not even paid before the store was opened. Branson was good enough at business to know traffic would bring customers.

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What speed do you read?

What speed do you read? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

I took this quick  reading speed test to compare my silent reading pace to the "national average". I read the sample passage at 345 words a minute which according to this test is the speed of an average 11th grader.  Most assistive technology readers like Read and Write Gold and Kurzweil set a default speed of about 150 words a minute. Oral reading requires more time than silent reading. 

 

It is nice to know that at least on this test, after over 3 decades of serving as a teacher, tutor, supervisor, division head, assistant principal, and headmaster,in high schools from Massachusetts to Hawaii, I am finally 'closing' on  graduating High School! 

...


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Reforming D.C.'s Schools: The Henderson Doctrine

Reforming D.C.'s Schools: The Henderson Doctrine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Ever since Kaya Henderson took over as chancellor of D.C.'s public schools, she's quietly gone about continuing in the footsteps of Michelle Rhee, her former boss.

But unlike Rhee, she has studiously avoided the media—and said very little about the work that Rhee did.
Until now. Over the weekend, Henderson gave WAMU's Kavitha Cardoza what we're going to call her philosophy on running the city's schools—and a not-so-veiled critique at how Rhee went about it.
"We at least try to share with people before we make huge decisions about the 'what' and the 'why'" she says. "So I think people have a clearer rationale as to what we're doing."
She also says media outlets aren't as interested in the nitty-gritty details of education reform.
"You cannot reform your school district in the spotlight of the national press," says Henderson. "You have to sit down with the people who are on the ground holding hands to do the messy difficult work together. And that is not headline grabbing."
Of course, not everyone is happy about the way Henderson has gone about the job she inherited from Rhee. The Examiner Jonetta Rose Barras says that she's been too timid in doing the hard work of making D.C.'s public schools better:

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Instructor Presence in the Online Class – Key to Learner Success

Instructor Presence in the Online Class – Key to Learner Success | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Part 1 in a 3 part series on the  concept of ‘Presence’ in the Online Classroom. "Instructor presence in the online environment can be elusive as a shadow – ....instructor presence in online learning communities is vital to ‘complete learning’ (by complete I mean student engages with content, applies higher order thinking skills, and produces tangible evidence that learning objectives are met). In the virtual environment the instructor needs to be ‘real’, 3 dimensional, have a personality, be the subject matter expert and as if this isn’t enough, help the student achieve the learning goals in this virtual space. A tall order. In this post I’ll share why and how instructor [virtual] presence is critical, essential instructional design components to facilitate presence, and strategies used by instructors that demonstrate presence so the student feels as if the professor is ‘there’."


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Science of Spatial Learning - U.S. News & World Report

Science of Spatial Learning - U.S. News & World Report | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Science of Spatial LearningU.S. News & World Report... research on spatial skills and spatial learning has been fragmented.

The goal of the center is to develop the science of spatial learning, and to transform educational practices by finding new ways to help children and adults acquire spatial skills in order for them to be successful in high technology fields. Temple University is the center’s lead institution, with research partners at Northwestern University, the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania.

The center, now in its sixth year, is a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science of Learning Center. The NSF supports the center with about $4 million annually over ten years.

Until recently, research on spatial skills and spatial learning has been fragmented. For example, spatial language researchers didn’t interact with researchers studying maps and diagrams, and neither communicated with scientists assessing individual differences in fundamental spatial skills. The center hopes to involve scientists across multiple disciplines.

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Mississippi Gov signs New law to help children with dyslexia

Mississippi Gov signs New law to help children with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Joseph South spent hours on first-grade reading assignments that should have taken minutes.

Before his parents and teachers in Clinton Public Schools discovered he had dyslexia, South felt like learning to read was a mountain he couldn't climb.

Now 17, the incoming senior at Canton Academy said he's glad that newly approved legislation will help more kids overcome reading, writing and spelling challenges.

"No other child should have to go through the beat down that comes with failing grades," he said Wednesday at a Capitol news conference.

South was at the conference to watch Gov. Phil Bryant sign a bill that will give dyslexic students in first through sixth grades the opportunity to move to other public or nonpublic schools employing dyslexia therapists.

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inClass - free app for managing your notes, courses, schedules and homework.

inClass - free app for managing your  notes, courses, schedules and homework. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This is a great free app for managing your courses. You can keep track of schedules and classes, but best of all you can take notes using text, voice, images or video.


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Treating Reading Disabilities: Teach in a direct, explicit, and systematic way.

Treating Reading Disabilities: Teach in a direct, explicit, and systematic way. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For children with dyslexia, addressing reading weaknesses requires a systematic approach. www. Smartkidswithld.org (Treating dyslexia?As with many learning disabilities, there is a continuum of dyslexia, with each child having his or her own unique learning profile.

In order to instruct these children properly, teachers must understand each student’s particular challenges, have a working knowledge of the rules of the English language, and know how to teach reading in a direct, individualized, explicit, and systematic way.

Reading is the product of two essential activities: decoding (the ability to understand how the letters of the alphabet represent the sounds we speak) and comprehension. The National Reading Panel has identified five core components of a comprehensive reading curriculum—phonemic awareness, explicit phonics, fluency, text comprehension, and vocabulary.

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The Who Doctors: Detecting dyslexia and treating it early | Deseret News

The Who Doctors: Detecting dyslexia and treating it early | Deseret News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Q: I think my 4-year-old son might have dyslexia; my dad had it. How can I be sure, and what should I do if he does?

Not long ago, the conventional wisdom about testing a child for reading problems was to wait until second grade (age 8), because that's when reading skills get up to speed — or not — and when dyslexia could be diagnosed.

Things have changed. Studies show it's possible to identify children as young as 3 who are at risk for dyslexia, and the chance of a child succeeding is much greater if he or she receives early treatment!

Simple visual attention tasks that ask a child to pick out certain symbols and filter relevant from irrelevant information can indicate processing problems. And MRIs can help confirm a diagnosis by identifying differences in brain activity in regions that detect and discriminate between speech sounds, which seem to be precursors to reading problems.

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Five of the most popular and highly rated education apps available for the iPad

Five of the most popular and highly rated education apps available for the iPad | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Five of the most popular and highly rated education apps available for the iPad to help stimulate students through fun and engaging educational games

 

The iPad is one of the most popular technological innovations of recent years, in part because of its enormous selection of apps that people can use in virtually every area — from personal finance and health to social networking and gaming.

In response to the importance of technology to education, numerous educational apps are being developed (often by teachers) to add another dimension to the classroom experience. One of the best ways to engage with students is through stimulating and educational games, and there are now a variety of such games available for the iPad. The following is a list of five widely used and highly reviewed educational games. They have each won significant awards or distinctions because of their popularity and the impact they have on learning, and should therefore be considered by any teacher looking to incorporate technology into his or her classroom.


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Anesthesia in children linked to learning disabilities?

Anesthesia in children linked to learning disabilities? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Boston—The jury is still out on the effects of anesthesia in children who undergo surgery at a young age, according to Constance S. Houck, MD. Multiple animal studies have demonstrated neuroapoptosis and long-term learning deficits in young animals after administration of general anesthesia, but population-based studies in humans have been far less clear.

A higher incidence of learning disabilities has been found in a cohort of children who have had multiple anesthetics before the age of 4 years but it is unclear whether this is due to effects of the anesthetic or other underlying medical issues that necessitated the multiple surgeries, said Dr. Houck, senior associate in perioperative anesthesia, Children’s Hospital Boston and associate professor of anesthesia, Harvard Medical School, Boston.

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Top 20 Educational iPhone & iPad Apps Used By Teachers in the Classroom

Top 20 Educational iPhone & iPad Apps Used By Teachers in the Classroom | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

With the advent of the 2011/2012 school year, teachers who have access to mobile technology are scrambling to find the best education apps for the iPod Touch, iPad and iPhone. Educators use apps for everything from communicating with students to inspiring creativity to dissecting virtual frogs. Luckily, we have lots of educators (including Apple Distinguished Educators) on Appolicious who share their lists of the best education apps for elementary, middle school, junior high, and high school.

These are the education apps most listed by educators on Appolicious.


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Intern'l Dyslexia Assoc. tries Guinness Wrld Record: reading 1 book in a reading relay in 1 day.

Intern'l Dyslexia Assoc. tries Guinness Wrld Record: reading 1 book in a reading relay in 1 day. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The International Dyslexia Association (IDA) has partnered with more than 25 schools around the country in an attempt to break the Guinness World Record for the most people reading a single book in a reading relay in one day.
The Extreme Reading Relay, which will be held on Thursday, May 10, 2012, is a national awareness campaign and fundraising event that will bring together more than 400 students in an attempt to break the current record of 415 people as noted on http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com. The record was set by the Prepa Tecnológico de Monterrey high school in Guadalajara, Mexico on September 23, 2011.
In this historic celebration of literacy, students will demonstrate that all struggling readers can learn to read successfully and become lifelong learners. The participants will read The Sword of Darrow, a middle grade fantasy novel co-authored by Hal Malchow and his son, Alex. When they began writing the novel in 2002, Alex, then eight years old, was struggling with a serious learning disability and could not read at all. The family contributes all royalties from the book, which is available on the IDA’s website, http://www.interdys.org.

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Dooley overcame hurdles for Olympic flight: the dyslexia that confused and frustrated him

Dooley overcame hurdles for Olympic flight:  the dyslexia that confused and frustrated him | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Sports: Dooley overcame hurdles for Olympic flight | dooley, trampoline, really, school, world, dyslexia, nancy, way, logan, cup...

 

Dooley realized at a young age that the trampoline could propel him to a place of refuge and discovery.
Soaring 15, eventually 20, 25 feet above the rest of us, he found peace and comfort on the edge. For hours Dooley bound repeatedly up into a place above the dyslexia that confused and frustrated him and the classmates who made his life miserable because of it. He was empowered as he flew higher into a place where he would be defined not by dyslexia, not by others, but by his own courage and imagination, limited only by gravity.
"When you're on the trampoline your body is the only thing that affects you," Dooley said. "If you get loose, you get crazy, you're flying off the trampoline, you're getting hurt. That's the physics behind trampoline. If stay in control, you're tight, you're doing your stuff, nobody can touch you. You're 25 feet above everybody else. It is a natural high."
In that rare air, Dooley found clarity to his world below. In his triple-flipping, double-twisting flights of self-discovery, he came to a realization that would change his life (and the lives of others): Sometimes being different also means you're special.
Dooley, a 24-year-old from Lake Forest, looks to lock up a spot in the 2012 Olympic Games at next month's U.S. championships in San Jose and is widely regarded as the best hope yet to secure Team USA's first ever Olympic trampoline medal. Already Dooley has made his sport, long dismissive of American trampoline athletes at the international level, take notice. Dooley's victory in a 2009 World Cup event in Ostend, Belgium, was the first ever World Cup victory by an American.
"That was a big breakthrough," said Peter Dodd, who, along with Robert Null, coaches Dooley at World Elite Gymnastics in Lake Forest. "And it changed the whole international outlook for the U.S.
"Before it was," Dodd continued, his voice taking a dismissive tone, "'Oh, the U.S.' Now it's 'Oh, shoot! It's the U.S.'"
The international trampoline community would not be the first group to mistakenly underestimate Dooley.
On his flight toward London, Dooley has not only overcome his struggle with dyslexia, but the disappointment of narrowly missing the 2008 Olympic team, a battle with often career-ending, potentially dangerous lost skill syndrome, the pressure of being the poster boy for his sport, and a knee injury that will likely require surgery after the Olympics. He has tackled all of it with the strength and resiliency he first found as a young boy trying to rise above the confusion of dyslexia and the schoolyard taunts that echoed through his frustration.

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What People Are Saying | Venture Philanthropy Partners

What People Are Saying | Venture Philanthropy Partners | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

One year ago today, we launched Leap of Reason: Managing to Outcomes in an Era of Scarcity via the email blast below. I’ve also included one of the first inbound comments we received literally minutes after the blast went out and suggest it is worth reflecting on. We certainly did not comprehend then what we would experience in the months ahead, for the reaction has been surprising and certainly well beyond anything we envisioned.

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UDL: based on learning sciences research: Next big thing in ED reform? eSchool News via @tperran | @scoopit http://bit.ly/...

UDL: based on learning sciences research: Next big thing in ED reform? eSchool News via @tperran | @scoopit http://bit.ly/... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

As educators brace for new reforms, what will these changes look like? How will assessments and curriculum differ from previous versions? How can all students get the best education possible?UDL, according to CAST, is an educational framework based on research in the learning sciences, including cognitive neuroscience, that guides the development of flexible learning environments that can accommodate individual learning differences.
Recognizing that the way each student learns can be unique, the UDL framework, first defined by CAST in the 1990s, calls for creating curriculum that provides:

Multiple means of representation to give learners various ways of acquiring information and knowledge;
Multiple means of expression to give learners alternatives for demonstrating what they know; and
Multiple means of engagement to tap into learners’ interests, challenge them appropriately, and motivate them to learn.
“Across the country, many educators, school districts, and states have discovered that UDL is not only a great way to improve daily classroom instruction while personalizing learning for each student, but also an effective way to implement Common Core State Standards, Race to the Top-funded initiatives, and other education reforms,” said the National Center on UDL in a statement.
According to the new two-part study, conducted with the support of the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation and titled “Universal Design for Learning (UDL): Initiatives on the Move,” all states now have UDL initiatives, and more than 150 school districts report using federal funding for UDL activities.


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Reading In American Schools: Will Common Core State Standards Improve Literacy? - Huffington Post

Reading In American Schools: Will Common Core State Standards Improve Literacy? - Huffington Post | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
As American students continue to fall behind foreign peers, 45 states and Washington, D.C. have adopted the Common Core State Standards, a new set of academic benchmarks aimed at raising the bar for teaching and learning across the country.

But as John Merrow reports for PBS News, meeting the new requirements won't be easy for many schools, as a long-taught reading curriculum for young children still learning to sound out words doesn't comply with the Common Core's guidelines for emphasis on nonfiction in literacy education.

Across the country, 65 percent of eighth graders do not meet grade level expectations in reading. And according to a report out in March, the average reading level of teens in grades 9-12 is 5.3 -- barely above the fifth grade.

Those results come from "What Kids Are Reading: The Book-Reading Habits of Students in American Schools," a report by Renaissance Learning, Inc. The data covers book-reading records for the 2010-2011 academic year among 2.6 million students in grades 1-12 from 24,465 schools in all 50 states and Washington, D.C.

To determine a book's level of complexity, Renaissance uses an ATOS readability formula that takes into account several predictors: average sentence length, average word length, word difficulty level and total number of words in a book or passage. While readability formulas can't say much for the depth of literary aspects within a text, they offer objective measures of vocabulary and sentence complexity.

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