Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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In Case you missed this: Kids With Learning Disorders Might Not Benefit From Memory Training Programs

In Case you missed this: Kids With Learning Disorders Might Not Benefit From Memory Training Programs | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Children with disorders, such as dyslexia or attention-deficit/hyperactivity, are not likely to benefit from working memory training, say researchers.

The study, conducted by researchers from the University of Oslo and University College London and published online in The British Journal of Developmental Psychology, also found that memory training tasks have limited effect on healthy children and adults seeking to improve their cognitive skills or do better in school.

Monica Melby-Lervåg, PhD, of the University of Oslo, and lead author of the study, explained:

"The success of working memory training programs is often based on the idea that you can train your brain to perform better, using repetitive memory trials, much like lifting weights builds muscle mass.

However, this analysis shows that simply loading up the brain with training exercises will not lead to better performance outside of the tasks presented within these tests."

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International Dyslexia Association Requests Reinstatement of "Dyslexia" in the DSM 5 revision

International Dyslexia Association Requests Reinstatement of  "Dyslexia" in the DSM 5 revision | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The International Dyslexia Association (IDA) voiced concerns today about proposed revisions to the fifth edition of the American Psychiatric Association's (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which no longer include the term "dyslexia."

"Many members of the International Dyslexia Association and dyslexia communities were heartened by inclusion of the term 'dyslexia' in an earlier round of proposed DSM-5 revisions," said Karen Dakin, secretary, IDA Board of Directors. "However, many view this latest round of revisions -- which now omits the term dyslexia -- as a significant step backward and worry that this omission will perpetuate lack of recognition and understanding of dyslexia and contribute to delays in diagnosis and treatment."

According to IDA, terminology used in the DSM-5 can have a profound impact on individuals' access to information, assessment, and educational, psychological, and medical services. The DSM includes codes for all mental health disorders currently recognized. With dyslexia appropriately named, described, and linked to treatment, individuals with this syndrome are more likely to be identified and provided with interventions that can improve their academic outcomes and quality of life.

In the latest revisions to the DSM-5, APA noted the following change: "Learning Disorder has been changed to Specific Learning Disorder and the previous types of Learning Disorder (Dyslexia, Dyscalculia, and Disorder of Written Expression) no longer are being recommended."

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With help from caring adults, 'at-risk' teenagers can succeed - Press Herald

With help from caring adults, 'at-risk' teenagers can succeed - Press Herald | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Thank you for having hope for me when I didn't have hope for myself ..."

These were one student's words as she spoke to a standing-room-only crowd, prepared to graduate from the Community Schools at Opportunity Farm and Camden last week.

We serve youth at risk of not completing high school – students who, for a variety of reasons, have not been successful in a traditional setting.

We operate a residential program in Camden and New Gloucester and the home-based Passages program for teen parents. We work with small groups of students on a highly individualized basis to help them become connected, contributing members of society and earn a state of Maine-approved high school diploma. Our students often come into our school as disengaged learners – where a difficult event in their lives or a challenging learning or school history has derailed their success.

As researchers in adolescence, we often talk about "risk and protective factors" predictive of problem behaviors such as substance abuse or delinquency. The ultimate goal of this body of work is to increase protective factors (e.g., resources, caring adults, access to quality after-school programs) and reduce risk factors (e.g., effects of poverty, abuse and neglect, truancy or dropping out).

Certainly, it is widely known that the presence of a caring adult is one very important protective factor.

Also, what we find in our work at the Community Schools is that simply keeping a youth engaged in school is one of our greatest protective factors. Our students are around caring adults who create a healthy environment for learning – which leads to a meaningful high school diploma.

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Dyslexia: With Determination the Disadvantages can be overcome

Dyslexia: With Determination the Disadvantages can be overcome | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

He had a higher-than-average IQ, but his school exam results did not reflect it. In Cheah Xian Pin's words, he was "very confused and unsure of what was going on".

What it was, was dyslexia. It made reading a slow, difficult process for Mr Cheah, but that did not stop him from devouring an average of one book a week, at one point.

Now 21, he is pursuing an accountancy degree at the Nanyang Technological University and working part-time at accountancy firm KPMG. For his determination to overcome the odds, Mr Cheah was one of two youths recognised with a Young Achiever's Award by the Dyslexia Association of Singapore (DAS).

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Do Aspergers, ADD and dyslexia make you more likely to be an entrepreneur?

Do Aspergers, ADD and dyslexia make you more likely to be an entrepreneur? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Economist in it’s latest edition suggests that business needs people with Asperger’s syndrome, attention-deficit disorder and dyslexia:

Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said that they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers. Prominent dyslexics include the founders of Ford, General Electric, IBM and IKEA, not to mention more recent successes such as Charles Schwab (the founder of a stockbroker), Richard Branson (the Virgin Group), John Chambers (Cisco) and Steve Jobs (Apple).

It also gives some data on ADD among entrepreneurs, and more anecdotal info on Aspergers among entrepreneurs, which I think would be the least controversial claim in the tech world. Which founders do you know that have Aspergers, ADD or dyslexia?

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Whoopi Goldberg Struggles with Dyslexia - The Power Of DyslexiaThe Power Of Dyslexia

Whoopi Goldberg Struggles with Dyslexia - The Power Of DyslexiaThe Power Of Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Over 40 million people in American suffer from dyslexia.
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John Chambers: Dyslexic CEO - The Power Of DyslexiaThe Power Of Dyslexia

John Chambers: Dyslexic CEO - The Power Of DyslexiaThe Power Of Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
John Chambers made the surprising confession that he suffers from the learning disability, dyslexia, to his daughter's classmates...
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Cool App - Storyrobe for StoryTelling:images on your device with a voice-over feature

Cool App - Storyrobe for StoryTelling:images on your device with a voice-over feature | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

 

Storyrobe is an exciting new digital storytelling application for the iPhone and iPod Touch. Storyrobe lets you tell create digital stories using images and video from your camera or photo library. You can use the built in microphone, or any 3rd party microphone to create audio recordings with photos and videos. Use Storyrobe to tell, share, and add to others stories creating a Storyrobe™


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Filmmaker Harvey Hubbell V Unveiling Dislecksia: The Movie

Filmmaker Harvey Hubbell V Unveiling Dislecksia: The Movie | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Dislecksia: The Movie is a comic documentary on the serious and often misunderstood subject of dyslexia. The film showcases life as a dyslexic and seeks to raise awareness for the approximately 35 million Americans who struggle with dyslexia.
Litchfield, CT (PRWEB) May 31, 2012
After spending six years creating the most comprehensive documentary on dyslexia, Hubbell completed Dislecksia: The Movie, and the film has recently begun it’s run on the film festival circuit, taking home Best Documentary and Best Director at the Greenville International Film Festival as well as Best Feature Documentary at the Black Hills Film Festival.

Read more: http://www.seattlepi.com/business/press-releases/article/Filmmaker-Harvey-Hubbell-V-Unveiling-Dislecksia-3597992.php#ixzz1weZ73Cpy

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Top 10 Apps for the Visually Impaired

Top 10 Apps for the Visually Impaired | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This article presents 10 apps specifically designed to make Apple's iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch more accessible to users who are blind or visually impaired. 

 

10 ways that apps are leveling the playing field for the blind and visually impaired!


Via Kathleen McClaskey
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Nine fun ways to stop summer brain drain - Macworld

Nine fun ways to stop summer brain drain - Macworld | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Nine fun ways to stop summer brain drainMacworld

You'll find games targeted to school-age children in its student section, Lumosity Scholar as well as some designed to help with specific learning differences like ADHD.

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Steps to identifying and treating dyslexia: prevent academic discouragement | Short Stories for Children

Steps to identifying and treating dyslexia: prevent academic discouragement | Short Stories for Children | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When I ask parents if they know what dyslexia is, a large majority will say something like: “Isn't that when you read upside down and backwards?”

 

For Sarah, reading was a laborious chore, something that she avoided at all costs. Tensions were high each night around homework time. our assessment of Sarah showed that she had great trouble with decoding (phonics) and that she frequently substituted words while she read (e.g., “pricopinny” for “porcupine”), which interrupted the flow of meaning in the text. The results of the testing and Sarah’s history suggested that she was dyslexic, yet there were no signs of reversals or upside down reading.

Helping Sarah’s parents understand that Sarah had a legitimate problem was essential. Like most families in these situations, Sarah’s parents needed to lighten up on the homework-time tension, yelling and pressure about reading. they needed to understand that Sarah’s difficulties were not the result of her not trying hard enough.

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Dyslexia Untied: Dyslexia: How Children Learn to Read - Montessori ...

Dyslexia Untied: Dyslexia: How Children Learn to Read - Montessori ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia: How Children Learn to Read - Montessori and Phonics. The skill of reading is special - and often difficult to acquire. The fact that anyone learns how to read is something of a miracle.

Spoken language develops both spontaneously and subconsciously. A 2-year old couldn't be taught sentence structure and grammar rules now matter how hard someone might try.

As Maria Montessori said, "The only language men ever speak perfectly is the one they learn in babyhood, when no one can teach them anything!"

Reading is different. It must be actively taught and consciously learned. If it's not actively taught, then even a life spent surrounded by the printed word will not teach someone who is illiterate how to read.

When a middle aged person finally admits that they don't know how to read, they must start at the beginning just like a child does, learning sounds and sounding out words. Imagine how many printed words - street signs, store names, words on TV - they have seen in a lifetime. But they were never able to simply "pick up" the skill of reading the way a child learns to speak.

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Action Alert! Rights for Children with Dyslexia

Action Alert! Rights for Children with Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In this Action Alert from Wrightslaw you can sign the petition to urge Congress to support a Bill of Rights for Children with Dyslexia. You will also learn how to send an email with your comments about the proposed revision to DSM5 removing Dyslexia.

Via Tina Marie DeLong
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In Praise of Misfits - CFO.com Magazine

In Praise of Misfits - CFO.com Magazine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In Praise of MisfitsCFO.com MagazineJulie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers.

 

Wired magazine once called it “the Geek Syndrome.” Speaking of Internet firms founded in the past decade, Peter Thiel, an early Facebook investor, told the New Yorker that: “The people who run them are sort of autistic.” Yishan Wong, an ex-Facebooker, wrote that Mark Zuckerberg, the founder, has “a touch of Asperger’s,” in that “he does not provide much active feedback or confirmation that he is listening to you.” Craig Newmark, the founder of Craigslist, says he finds the symptoms of Asperger’s “uncomfortably familiar” when he hears them listed.

Similar traits are common in the upper reaches of finance. The quants have taken over from the preppies. The hero of Michael Lewis’s book The Big Short, Michael Burry, a hedge-fund manager, is a loner who wrote a stock-market blog as a hobby while he was studying to be a doctor. He attracted so much attention from money managers that he quit medicine to start his own hedge fund, Scion Capital. After noticing that there was something awry with the mortgage market, he made a killing betting that it would crash. “The one guy that I could trust in the middle of this crisis,” Lewis told National Public Radio, “was this fellow with Asperger’s and a glass eye.”

Entrepreneurs also display a striking number of mental oddities. Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers. Prominent dyslexics include the founders of Ford, General Electric, IBM, and IKEA, not to mention more recent successes such as Charles Schwab (the founder of a stockbroker), Richard Branson (the Virgin Group), John Chambers (Cisco), and Steve Jobs (Apple).

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Why Business Needs People With Asperger's Syndrome, Attention-Deficit Disorder And Dyslexia

Why Business Needs People With Asperger's Syndrome, Attention-Deficit Disorder And Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In 1956 William Whyte argued in his bestseller, "The Organisation Man", that companies were so in love with "well-rounded" executives that they fought a "fight against genius".
Today many suffer from the opposite prejudice. Software firms gobble up anti-social geeks. Hedge funds hoover up equally oddball quants.
Hollywood bends over backwards to accommodate the whims of creatives. And policymakers look to rule-breaking entrepreneurs to create jobs.
Unlike the school playground, the marketplace is kind to misfits.
Recruiters have noticed that the mental qualities that make a good computer programmer resemble those that might get you diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome: an obsessive interest in narrow subjects; a passion for numbers, patterns and machines; an addiction to repetitive tasks; and a lack of sensitivity to social cues. Some joke that the internet was invented by and for people who are "on the spectrum", as they put it in the Valley. Online, you can communicate without the ordeal of meeting people.

 

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The Neurocritic: G r e a t e r / l e t t e r / s p a c i n g / helps reading in dyslexia

The Neurocritic: G r e a t e r / l e t t e r / s p a c i n g / helps reading in dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Simply increasing the spacing between letters improves the reading ability of children with developmental dyslexia, according to a group of Italian and French researchers (Zorzi et al., 2012). Dyslexic children were 20% faster and twice as accurate when reading the altered text. This impressive result was obtained without any prior training whatsoever.

The study was based on the phenomenon of crowding, where the recognition of individual letters is impaired by the close proximity of surrounding letters. Children with dyslexia are disproportionately affected by crowding, compared to normally developing children (Martelli et al., 2009). Other aspects of the printed word are known to affect reading ability, but surprisingly little is known about letter spacing. The recommendations of the British Dyslexia Association include optimizing the size and type of font, page layout, headings, type of paper, and line spacing but not letter spacing.1

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Praiseworthy legislation addresses dyslexia | The Sun Herald

Praiseworthy legislation addresses dyslexia  | The Sun Herald | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
One of the good pieces of legislation to come out of this year's session was signed into law by Gov. Phil Bryant.

The new law also gives dyslexic students in the first six grades the ability to move to a new public or non-public school if it is determined the student can be better served by the transfer.

A separate bill also signed by Bryant creates a scholarship program for people who want to study dyslexia therapy.

There's no telling how many people were considered "slow learners" because of this condition. Many were otherwise highly intelligent, but because they couldn't learn to read properly, were behind throughout their school years. Too many dropped out. A couple of notable ones we can recall were allowed to stay in school without achieving much except to excel in football.

Bryant himself says he was in the fourth grade before a teacher discovered dyslexia was causing him to scramble words and failing to put the right sounds with letters.

"I repeated the third grade. What a difficult, horrible experience that was for a child," Bryant said at the bill signing.

Read more here: http://www.sunherald.com/2012/06/03/3983761/praiseworthy-legislation-addresses.html#storylink=cpy

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Billy Bob Thornton’s Dyslexia On and Off the Page The Power Of Dyslexia

Billy Bob Thornton’s Dyslexia On and Off the Page The Power Of Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"So I'm Billy Bob Thorton and I'm a dyslexic," his interview begins. Thorton is talking to Harvey Hubble V in a Youtube excerpt from the comedy documentary Dislecksia: the movie....

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Education Rethink:From Compliant Kids 2 Ethical Thinkers:Compliance vs Conscientiousness

Education Rethink:From Compliant Kids 2 Ethical Thinkers:Compliance vs Conscientiousness | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A student walks in late to my class for the fourth day in a row. I pull him aside and explain authoritatively that I will not tolerate his misbehavior.

 

Listening is as important as speaking. Compliance is almost always about following rules rather than engaging in a dialogue, while empowering students begins with listening. You never know the whole story. Never. The best you can do as a teacher is to draw out the story through a conversation.
Change happens relationally and it requires trust. Humility is the catalyst for this type of change. On the other hand, compliance breaks down trust and causes students to hide.
The goal of classroom leadership should be empowering students to be responsible decision-makers. Or, to put it more simply, I want students to make wise decisions. It’s important to talk students through their decision-making process and their own sense of ethical development.
Humility and vulnerability are not signs of weakness, but signs of a mature teacher that students can approach with confidence.
Quit bribing kids for good behavior. Ethical people do the right thing because it's the right thing to do. I wouldn't stop by a stranded motorist and say, "I'm sorry, but I'll need a set of stickers before I help you out."


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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In praise of misfits:Why business needs people with Asperger’s syndrome, ADD and dyslexia

In praise of misfits:Why business needs people with Asperger’s syndrome, ADD  and dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
IN 1956 William Whyte argued in his bestseller, “The Organisation Man”, that companies were so in love with “well-rounded” executives that they fought a “fight against genius”. Today many suffer from the opposite prejudice. Software firms gobble up anti-social geeks. Hedge funds hoover up equally oddball quants. Hollywood bends over backwards to accommodate the whims of creatives. And policymakers look to rule-breaking entrepreneurs to create jobs. Unlike the school playground, the marketplace is kind to misfits.

Recruiters have noticed that the mental qualities that make a good computer programmer resemble those that might get you diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome: an obsessive interest in narrow subjects; a passion for numbers, patterns and machines; an addiction to repetitive tasks; and a lack of sensitivity to social cues. Some joke that the internet was invented by and for people who are “on the spectrum”, as they put it in the Valley. Online, you can communicate without the ordeal of meeting people.

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How Video Games Make Schools Better | Online Universities

How Video Games Make Schools Better  | Online Universities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The April 24, 2012 Brookings Institute report, How Blogs, Social Media, and Video Games Improve Education, by Darrell West, examines research and best practices to provide an enlightening overview of the ways in which these popular technologies make education (at all levels) more engaging and effective


Via JackieGerstein Ed.D.
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Issues in Teaching and Learning:Rhode Island College Journal

Rhode Island College is producing a new journal in education, focusing on technology and online learning.  Check it out! 


Via Seth Dixon
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When Traditional Schools Fail: Homeschooling resources for children with ADD/ADHD: 7 slides

When Traditional Schools Fail: Homeschooling resources for children with ADD/ADHD: 7 slides | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The traditional approach to learning -- a teacher standing in front of children sitting behind desks -- is not the most productive for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADD/ADHD) children who get bored easily. If your child is demoralized by his poor grades, receives detention for forgetting books, is looked down upon by teachers, or is bullied by classmates, he may be a candidate for homeschooling.

Melinda Boring, who started Heads Up Now!, a company that supplies information and products for parents, teachers, and therapists who work with hyperactive, distractible, and sensory-challenged children, home-schooled her daughter Beckie and son Josh, both of whom were diagnosed as having ADD/ADHD. “Josh rarely followed directions, and he became agitated when asked to sit still,” says Boring. “Sights, sounds, and even odors that most people didn’t notice bothered him. It wasn’t that he didn’t want to do what teachers asked of him, he just couldn’t.”

Josh graduated from home high school in 2006, and is working full-time and taking college courses. Beckie is a junior in home high school, and takes classes at the local community college. She earns A’s at both schools.

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Knees: The Mixed-Up World of a Boy with Dyslexia by Vanita Oelschlager ...

Knees: The Mixed-Up World of a Boy with Dyslexia by Vanita Oelschlager ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Louis is in the fourth grade. He is a typical boy with bright, alert eyes and a kid-style smirk for a smile. Louis likes school—sometimes. School is not easy for Louis. He has a “mixed-up brain” that often sees things differently than the other boys and girls. Louis has dyslexia. No matter how hard he tries, words look backwards.

Sometimes, when Louis writes, reads, and speaks, the words get twisted and turned around. A “b” will look like a “d.” When someone speaks, the words can get garbled and difficult to understand. Louis needs extra time to get his work done. He has a special teacher to helps him learn. She must be understanding and patient, above all else.

Louis is actually in good company, though I doubt he would agree. Einstein, Edison, Walt Disney, Picasso, and Magic Johnson all are dyslexic. Dyslexia does not stop a kid from having friends, fun, and a goal. Louis’ dad told him “We’re all good at something. You just have to find it.”

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