Students with dys...
Follow
Find
24.2K views | +4 today
Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
Curated by Lou Salza
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Different schools for different learners: Eton Academy alumni encourage students to overcome 'differences'

Different schools for different learners: Eton Academy alumni encourage students to overcome 'differences' | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Eton Academy students don’t let learning disabilities get in the way of their hopes of going to college.

In fact, they and school officials often refer to learning disabilities, such as dyslexia, as learning “differences.”

Returning alumni credit the Eton program for teaching them how to overcome their differences, be accepted at a college and go on to a successful career.

Since 1986, almost all of Eton’s graduates have gone on to higher education, compared to 14 percent of similar students nationwide, according to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, a statistic cited by Dawn Frasa, Eton’s spokeswoman......"

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

MIT Discovers the Location of Memories: Individual Neurons| The Committed Sardine

MIT Discovers the Location of Memories: Individual Neurons| The Committed Sardine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The main significance here is that we finally have proof that memories (engrams, in neuropsychology speak) are physical rather than conceptual. We now know that, as in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, specific memories could be erased. It also gives us further insight into degenerative diseases and psychiatric disorders, which are mostly caused by the (faulty) interaction of neurons. “The more we know about the moving pieces that make up our brains,” says Steve Ramirez, co-author of the paper. “The better equipped we are to figure out what happens when brain pieces break down.”


Via Tom Perran
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Excellent classroom advice: Seven Brain Based Learning Principles

Excellent classroom advice: Seven Brain Based Learning Principles | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

1. Talking! Research has taught us that learners don't learn much from sitting and listening. Sure, they need to listen a bit, but they need the opportunity to talk! The talking internalizes what they've learned. In my classroom, I'll give the children a few tidbits of information, then they have "turn and talk" time, where they discuss what they've learned. They love this, and it works! 2. Emotions rule! If you think about the strong memories you have from your past, I'll bet they are closely related to strong emotional experiences, both positive or negative: your wedding, your child being born, a death... strong emotions. This works with children, too! Hopefully, your teaching won't bring out too many negative emotions, but there are ways to get to the positive ones! Kids love games. Some children are very competitive, and thrive on that stuff! Getting up in front of their classmates brings out plenty of emotions. Of course, different kids feel different things, so just be careful about playing with the emotions of children. What works for one might traumatize another. (Yikes, don't want to go there!) 3. Visuals! Vision is the strongest of the senses. Talking alone isn't enough. Make sure the children have plenty to look at in addition to what you say. Use posters, drawings, videos, pictures, and even some guided imagery with the children to help them learn. 4. Chunking! The typical attention span is the child's age plus or minus a couple of minutes. That means that many of my second graders can't attend past 5 minutes. Again, proof that typical "lecture" type teaching just doesn't work. That means they need a chunk of information, then an opportunity to process that in some way. Here's where "turn and talk" works, as well as an opportunity to write, draw, or even move. 5. Movement! Combining movement with the learning almost guarantees stronger learning. Here are some ideas: Counting by tens while doing jumping jacks, touch three desks while naming the three states of matter, and this one, from a blog post I wrote in the fall. 6. Shake it up! If you do exactly the same thing, exactly the same way, it becomes boring and the brain tunes out. Don't get me wrong, there are a lot of good things about sticking with a routine, but once in a while you need to shake it up! Have a backwards day, turning the whole schedule around (within reason, of course!) change the seating arrangement, do one part of the day completely different. We need this in our own lives, too, don't we? 7. The brain needs oxygen! They say 20% of all the oxygen used in the body is used by the brain. That means we need to get the kids up out of their seats regularly and moving!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from Dyslexia DiaBlogue®
Scoop.it!

What is Working Memory and Why Does it Matter?

What is Working Memory and Why Does it Matter? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Working memory is your brain's Post-it note, says Tracy Packiam Alloway, Ph.D., assistant professor of psychology at the University of North Florida in Jacksonville, Florida. "It makes all the difference to successful learning," she says.

You can think of working memory as the active part of your memory system. It's like mental juggling, says H. Lee Swanson, Ph.D., distinguished professor of education with the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Riverside. "As information comes in, you're processing it at the same time as you store it," he says. A child uses this skill when doing math calculations or listening to a story, for example. She has to hold onto the numbers while working with them. Or, she needs to remember the sequence of events and also think of what the story is about, says Swanson.If working memory is weak, it can trip up just about anyone. But it really works against a child with learning disabilities (LD). You can take steps to help a child with weak working memory, whether or not LD is a part of the picture.


Via Tom Perran, Carolyn D Cowen
more...
enrique rubio royo's curator insight, January 5, 2013 4:36 PM

Importancia de la memoria de trabajo a la hora de aprender...

 

"Tracy Packiam Alloway: working memory is a better test of ability than IQ"

 

Automated Working Memory Assessment (AWMA) vs IQ (coeficiente de inteligencial).

 

Otras referencias de interés...Making, Playing, Learning and Working Memory (http://classroom-aid.com/2012/12/17/making-playing-learning-and-working-memory/); How does working memory work in the classroom? (How does working memory work in the classroom?); working memory | Tumblr http://www.tumblr.com/tagged/working%20memory); ...

 

muy interesante en cuanto a las funciones ejecutivas y redes cerebrales asociadas (UDL).

Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Breakthrough technology for the hearing impaired:: Middle ear microphone improves cochlear implants...

Breakthrough technology for the hearing impaired:: Middle ear microphone improves cochlear implants... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
U.S researchers are developing a tiny middle ear "microphone" that could remove the need for any external components on cochlear implants.

Led by University of Utah engineer Darrin J. Young, the research team has produced and tested a prototype of the device which uses an accelerometer attached to the tiny bones of the middle ear to detect sound vibration....

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from History and Social Studies Education
Scoop.it!

Beyond the bachelor's degree: Associate degrees see higher growth rate in the future

Beyond the bachelor's degree: Associate degrees see higher growth rate in the future | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Education matters for earning potential. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

3min.video/Instructional Research:Direct Instruction supports achievement on standardized tests

3min.video/Instructional Research:Direct Instruction supports achievement on standardized tests | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Mary McCaslin discusses her paper co-authored with Heidi Legg Burross, \"Research on Individual Differences Within a Sociocultural Perspective: Co-regulation and Adaptive Learning.\" (WATCH Mary McCaslin from @UofA discuss sociocultural perspectives...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Education Reform: What Obama and Romney Won't Tell You | TIME.com @arotherham

Education Reform: What Obama and Romney Won't Tell You | TIME.com @arotherham | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"According to a recent poll, 67 percent of registered voters in swing states said education was "extremely important" to them in this year's election.Parents of high schoolers and college students are particularly worried, or they should be, that the interest rate on federally backed student loans is set to double in July, from 3.4 percent to 6.8 percent. Meanwhile, only 8 percent of low-income students even make it out of college by age 24. Business leaders agree America needs to do a better job educating its kids if we want to remain competitive globally. Yet despite all that, President Obama and Mr. Romney aren’t talking about education’s hard questions. They aren’t even talking up their own successes. Why? Because education reform doesn’t fit well with the overall argument either candidate is making about why he should get to sit in the Oval Office next January...."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from Assistive Technology & Educational Apps
Scoop.it!

The Blio App - Leveling the Playing Field for Dyslexics

The Blio App - Leveling the Playing Field for Dyslexics | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Blio is an ereader that can read various formats including PDF, epub and XML.  What does this mean for students with reading disabilities or dyslexia?

 

Blio includes:

> a text-to-speech feature that will cost $10;

>  a sync feature where it will sync audio books with test and highlight the word as it is being read;

> a notetaking feature where you can select text and add a note;

> a visual customization feature that can change the view, text size, etc.

>  a reading speed feature;

> a search text feature;

> a one-touch look up feature that can locate the definition of a word.


Via Kathleen McClaskey, Maggie Rouman, Tina Marie DeLong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from iPads and Tablets in Education
Scoop.it!

365 million iOS devices 'in play,' iPad taking off in education and government markets

365 million iOS devices 'in play,' iPad taking off in education and government markets | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"After the most recent quarter Apple CFO Peter Oppenheimer was proud to let us all know that there are now 365 million iOS devices "in play," with over 50 million sold just in Q2. With the iPhone now available in 100 countries on 230 carriers and the new iPad shipping in over 40 countries, the continued growth isn't much of a surprise. Obviously, as the number of devices in the hands of users increases, so does the number of apps, and in this quarter the iTunes app store topped 600,000 apps -- including over 200,000 specifically designed for the iPad. The iPad in particular was singled out as being a driver for growth. Tim Cook said that 67 million iPads have been sold since the first model debuted. By contrast, he claims it took 24 years to sell that many Macs. Oppenheimer said that the education market was increasingly turning to the tablet, purchasing them by a margin of almost two-to-one over Macs. The San Diego school district in particular ordered 10,000 this quarter and has plans to purchase 15,000 more. Even the government is getting in on the action, with the air force using them as flight guides. For more details from Cupertino's earnings call check out our live blog.."


Via Sam Gliksman
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Rhode Island School of Design Offers New Summer Course in Data Visualization

Rhode Island School of Design Offers New Summer Course in Data Visualization | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Rh"ode Island School of Designs Digital + Media Department offers “Visualizing Data: Art + Code”, a new summer course devoted to the emerging art form created by the presentation of data through innovative, elegant and artful design solutions. See the course description.

Visualizing Data: Art + Code”, taught by Kyuha “Q” Shim and offered as part of RISDs Summer Studies Art and Design Courses, is a 3-credit course open to any interested student 18 years of age or older. The course, held on the RISD campus in Providence, RI, is a unique opportunity for artists and designers of all backgrounds and mediums to understand code and decrypt data in order to effectively convert information into distinctive visual forms of art and communication.,..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Mario Morino Lawrence School Trustee & VPP Chairman speaks at City Club;Cleveland:Oldest Civic Forum in USA|

Mario Morino Lawrence School Trustee & VPP Chairman speaks at City Club;Cleveland:Oldest Civic Forum in USA| | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Mario will be giving a speech at the City Club of Cleveland (my hometown) at 12:30 EDT this Friday, April 27. Please tune in (info below) if you can spare the time.

The speech seeks to lift up the Leap of Reason message—from one about outcomes assessment and performance management to one that is tightly focused on building high-performance institutions in the nonprofit and public sectors.

It will be hard-hitting and speaks with urgency about the challenges nonprofits and public-sector agencies face as a result of seismic social, economic, and demographic shifts. But, as usual, it offers concrete, practical advice on how we can address these challenges head on.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from The World of Dyslexia
Scoop.it!

Expert Perspectives on Interventions For Reading By: Louisa C. Moats, Karen E. Dakin & R. Malatesha Joshi

Expert Perspectives on Interventions For Reading By: Louisa C. Moats, Karen E. Dakin & R. Malatesha Joshi | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This new book brings together for the first time the most requested and timeless articles on key literacy related topics over the past decade from IDA’s Perspectives on Language and Literacy. Inside you will find a solid foundation of research-based, classroom-tested principles in a practice-ready format that is ideal for teachers, administrators, graduate and undergraduate students of education, and policy makers who are seeking gold standard solutions to the intractable problems of illiteracy.


Via Tina Marie DeLong
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

6 Breakthrough Charter Schools play central role in Cleveland school district's plans (gallery)

6 Breakthrough Charter Schools play central role in Cleveland school district's plans (gallery) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- Charter schools were once the bad guys in the minds of school district officials, who considered them a horde of profiteers out to pillage students and dollars from traditional public schools.
Not anymore. At least not when it comes to the Cleveland school district and its chosen charter partner, Breakthrough Schools.
The group of six charter schools is the district's model for a new educational order in Cleveland, one where the district sponsors new charters to help provide quality options for parents, creates partnerships with other successful charters and eventually shares property tax money with them.
It's a model the Cleveland school district has been edging toward over the last several years and that will accelerate under the schools plan that district chief Eric Gordon and Mayor Frank Jackson have proposed to the state legislature.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Thank you @anniemurphypaul for What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

Thank you @anniemurphypaul for What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple University in Philadelphia propose that it be taught earlier, however—much earlier. As in first grade.


~Via Annie Murphy Paul


Via Gina Stepp, Tom Perran
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
Scoop.it!

Seven Brain Based Learning Principles

Seven Brain Based Learning Principles | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The brain needs to make patterns and associations in order for new material to make sense. 2. Humor decreases stress and increases learning speed. 3. The working memory can hold 2 to 4 chunks of information at a time, usually in about 4 - 8 minutes. After that, the brain needs time to process, reflect and review in order for those chunks to move to the long term memory. 4. Music boosts brain organization and ability. It affects our moods and emotions. Music goes hand in hand with math. 5. The brain is a parallel processor. It needs to activate more than one process at a time. This is why lecture-type teaching doesn't work. Try combinations, such as listening and moving or watching and listening. 6. Practice does NOT make "perfect". Practice with appropriate feedback makes "better". Feedbackshould be honest and immediate, if possible. 7. If children are engaged cognitively, physically, emotionally and socially, learning will happen.


Via Tom Perran
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from Dyslexia DiaBlogue®
Scoop.it!

Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain, larger hippocampus

Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain, larger hippocampus | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Exercise seems to slow or reverse the brain’s physical decay, much as it does with muscles. Although scientists thought until recently that humans were born with a certain number of brain cells and would never generate more, they now know better. In the 1990s, using a technique that marks newborn cells, researchers determined during autopsies that adult human brains contained quite a few new neurons. Fresh cells were especially prevalent in the hippocampus, indicating that neurogenesis — or the creation of new brain cells — was primarily occurring there. Even more heartening, scientists found that exercise jump-starts neurogenesis. Mice and rats that ran for a few weeks generally had about twice as many new neurons in their hippocampi as sedentary animals. Their brains, like other muscles, were bulking up...."


Via Tom Perran, Carolyn D Cowen
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Kay Shames Director at CSU's Center for Arts and Innovation: 10 Minutes With ...

Kay Shames Director at CSU's Center for Arts and Innovation: 10 Minutes With ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
"The [Creative Voices Summit and Arts Education Day Summit] is an annual one-day, two-part event. The morning session, produced in partnership with Ideastream, studies creativity across the disciplines. Last year the topic was Arts and Politics. This year we will be taking an unconventional look at The Creative Mind. . . . At noon the Arts Education Luncheon, held on the State Theatre stage at PlayhouseSquare, features student performances showing arts education in action. . . . This year's speaker is the actor Ben Vereen. Previous speakers have included Rosie Perez, Michael York, LeVar Burton, Richard Dreyfuss, Harry Belafonte, and even football great Lynn Swann, who talked about the role that ballet played in his career. It's a great coming-together of the cultural, educational and civic communities. Check it out at csuohio.edu/cai.continue to be fascinated with showcasing creativity across the disciplines.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

+ Preschoolers Reading: One Modest Change Helps | Dyslexia ...

+ Preschoolers Reading: One Modest Change Helps | Dyslexia ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A Science Daily article reports on research done at Ohio Satate University which suggests that a small change in how teachers and parents read aloud to preschoolers can give children a big boost in later reading skills.

If parents and teachers simply make specific references to print in books as they read — pointing out letters or words or capital letters, showing that we read from left to right — a benefit shows up later on in school.

The study shows that preschool children whose teachers used print references during storybook reading showed more advanced reading skills one — and even two — years later, compared to children whose teachers did not use such references...

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from 21st Century Concepts-Technology in the Classroom
Scoop.it!

Is Reverse Instruction Education Technology’s Perfect Storm? | Emerging Education Technology

Is Reverse Instruction Education Technology’s Perfect Storm? | Emerging Education Technology | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A gradual adoption of reverse instruction techniques offers an opportunity to leverage a wide variety of instructional technologies in a way that doesn’t have to break the bank and can deliver many enhancements to the teaching and learning process. Successful incorporation of flipped classroom methods in our middle schools, high schools, and colleges could improve on the public’s perspective of how technology can play a powerful role in teaching, and facilitate the transformation of education that so many are calling for.


Via Nik Peachey, Tom Perran
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

4 Common-Sense Proposals for Special Education Reform-Atlantic Monthly

4 Common-Sense Proposals for Special Education Reform-Atlantic Monthly | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

1. Focus on improving regular education for all students. The better that regular education is, the fewer students need to be identified for special education services. When developing inclusive programs, schools should base them on effective teaching practices that improve educational outcomes for both students with disabilities and regular education students. As part of this mission, align IDEA and NCLB to end confusion.

2. For the 70 to 80 percent of students discussed above, work to end the "medical model" in which IDEA eligibility for services requires a specialist's diagnosis. This model is costly, problematic, and inexact. It often kicks in too late, after previously undiagnosed students have struggled and failed. The far better solution is to provide timely and appropriate education services for all students in our schools, based on their current performance, without the need for a diagnosis or label.

3. End the compliance-based approach to special education. Parents and teachers alike should be liberated from endless form-filling and meetings. Compliance does not improve student results. Only time on task -- in classrooms -- does.

4. End the adversarial approach of "private enforcement" by parents and use other dispute resolution models, such as via mediators and ombudsmen or federal and state enforcement mechanisms that encourage trust-building and collaboration between schools and parents.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lou Salza from Elevator Pitch: Education for Sustainability
Scoop.it!

Another great reason to live in NE OH! Portland Best Practices Delegation to Visit Northeast Ohio

Another great reason to live in NE OH! Portland Best Practices Delegation to Visit Northeast Ohio | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

CLEVELAND, Ohio, April 23, 2012 – A 60+ member delegation from Portland, Oregon selected Cleveland and Northeast Ohio for its 2012 best practices mission. The group includes business, economic development, academic, and state and local government leaders. It is sponsored by Greater Portland, Inc., which is the Portland-Vancouver regional economic development partnership.
According to the organizers, greater Cleveland and Northeast Ohio were selected due to the demonstrable strides that have been made in economic development in the last ten years. They view Cleveland as an innovative city that fosters entrepreneurship and has a network of partners to develop and excel in the areas most critical to urban success: talent, connections, innovation and distinctiveness. In particular, the group cited collaborative regional efforts, regenerating public spaces and leveraging restoring historic areas.The trip also included a presentation by CWRU's Fowler Center for Sustainable Value to learn about Sustainability Circles & Cleveland Educators for Sustainability. Cleveland leads the nation in many aspects of sustainability, especially urban gardening and the local food movement.   Portland is VERY smart to invest time and energy in discovering best practices across the country.

 


Via Linda Alexander
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Project Eye to Eye: Mentoring Program for Children with Learning Differences

Project Eye to Eye: Mentoring Program for Children with Learning Differences | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Project Eye-To-Eye is a national mentoring and advocacy program for students with learning differences and/or ADHD. Through the program, younger students are matched with high school and college students who also have LD/ADHD and who act as mentors, tutors, and role models.

“Research shows that the most important element in the life success of labeled individuals is not IQ or academic success, but self-esteem. Project Eye-To-Eye’s fundamental mission is to give younger labeled students hope by bringing a mentor into their lives who can model success and empower younger students to imagine a positive future for themselves.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

A moving film about the life of a school - Washington Post (blog)

A moving film about the life of a school - Washington Post (blog) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Too many films about school insist on showing the teaching and learning enterprise at its worst. Students are portrayed as at best troubled and often just rotten, teachers are stupid or mean; parents are arrogant or absent. “Monsieur Lazhar” doesn’t, and that is only part of what distinguishes this moving, intelligent Canadian film, which opens in the Washington D.C. region on Friday.

The film, a 2012 Academy Award finalist for Best Foreign Language Film adapted from a one-character play, tells the story of an Algerian immigrant in Montreal who takes over an elementary school class after the students’ popular teacher commits suicde.

Over the course of the quietly powerful movie, the audience learns that the new teacher, Bachir Lazhar, has suffered a tragedy of his own, and it watches as the adult and the students over whom he takes charge, go through a healing process separately and together....."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Dyslexia Program on National Public Radio

Dyslexia Program on National Public Radio | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Policymakers in Washington, DC, and the rest of the nation listened on February 15, 2012, to “The Dyslexic Brain,” a featured program on National Public Radio’s The Diane Rehm Show.

One of the featured experts was NCLD’s Director of Public Policy, Laura Kaloi.

 

Ms. Rehm was intrigued that Laura was not only the Director of Public Policy at NCLD, but that she has a husband and son with dyslexia. Other guests approached from a research perspective — they study learning and the brain:

Dr. Brock Eide, clinician and co-author with Dr. Fernette Eide of "The Dyslexic Advantage: Unlocking the Hidden Potential of the Dyslexic Brain"
Jeffrey Gilger, professor, School of Social Sciences, Humanities and Arts, University of California, Merced
Guinevere Eden , director, Center for the Study of Learning; professor, Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University Medical Center

more...
No comment yet.