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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Nonprofits Help 'Turn the Page' to a Brighter Future With $693,000 in 'Verizon Reads' Grants

Nonprofits Help 'Turn the Page' to a Brighter Future With $693,000 in 'Verizon Reads' Grants | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

BALTIMORE, June 21, 2012

 

"-- Creating portable classrooms to bring the joy of reading to the community. Supporting adult basic and English literacy programs. Helping students reduce summer learning loss. Teaching computer literacy skills. And providing tutoring services to children with dyslexia. Nonprofits in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia that provide these important services will be able to do even more, thanks to nearly $693,000 in funding grants from Verizon Reads.

Verizon Reads, an initiative funded through the Verizon Foundation, supports nonprofit organizations devoted to technology, literacy and educational programs for children, adolescents and adults".

"In today's global society, reading and comprehension skills are fundamental building blocks for a person's success in work and life," said Anthony A. Lewis, Verizon's Mid-Atlantic region vice president of state government affairs. "These Verizon Reads grants help strengthen the region's nonprofit organizations that work tirelessly to provide both youth and adults with the tools and training they need to improve their education, achieve their goals and contribute to their communities.

"Verizon is a global solutions provider in communications, broadband and entertainment," said Lewis. "We also are committed to a philosophy of shared success, in which we work to provide solutions that improve the communities we serve and create opportunities for people to prosper and excel."

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IndyCar's Wilson promoting dyslexia awareness

IndyCar's Wilson promoting dyslexia awareness | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Justin Wilson still remembers a time when his classmates considered it laughable that he might one day grow up to become a professional race car driver.

The IndyCar Series driver had a tough time growing up in Sheffield, England, struggling to read lessons or do the writing it took to complete his school work. Only later, around age 14, would he be diagnosed with dyslexia.

"I really struggled at school," Wilson said. "I remember one day, the teacher asking what you want to be when you grow up. And everyone went down and did their thing and it got to me: ‘I want to race cars.’ And everyone laughed. What’s wrong with you guys? And then some joker stood up, ‘Oh, you’ll never race cars. You’re too stupid."’

Today, Wilson has seven career IndyCar victories, including the June 9 race at Texas Motor Speedway. His success has come despite his continued struggles with dyslexia, a reading disability that occurs when the brain does not properly recognize and process certain symbols.

When Wilson looks at a word on a page, he generally can recognize the letters at the beginning of the word and the letters at the end of it — but not the letters in the middle.

"So I still get sentences wrong. I still spell wrong. I still read things the wrong way," Wilson said.

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Braingenie: comprehensive math and science practice site

Braingenie:  comprehensive math and science practice site | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Braingenie is the Web's most comprehensive math and science practice site. Popular among educators and families, Braingenie provides practice and video lessons in more than 4,000 skills.


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For businessman Anders Hedlund School years were the unhappiest; says man who now employs 3,000 people

For businessman Anders Hedlund School years were the unhappiest; says man who now employs 3,000 people | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

MILLIONAIRE businessman Anders Hedlund employs more than 3,000 staff and is well established as one of Wales’ leading entrepreneurs.

But success has been hard earned and Swedish-born Mr Hedlund has had to overcome one obstacle in particular.

“My school years were the unhappiest of my life,” he said.

“I couldn’t read or spell and I was called lazy and stupid by my teachers. If you don’t understand or if people are telling you that you’re stupid, then that’s what you think,” Mr Hedlund said.

Like his father and son, Mr Hedlund is dyslexic – but the condition went unnoticed.

 

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Author, Tressa Messenger, defeats Dyslexia and Writes a Trilogy

Author, Tressa Messenger, defeats Dyslexia and Writes a Trilogy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

We learned that Tressa Messenger struggled through school with dyslexia, a prominent and commonly undiagnosed learning disability. Tressa is one of over two million students struggling with dyslexia – reported by the NY Times.

She grew up with the insecurity of thinking she was inadequate, leading to low self esteem and depression. Like other students suffering with dyslexia, she dropped out of school at a young age.

Years later, Tressa was diagnosed with dyslexia. Instead of giving up on her dreams, she was determined to succeed! She earned her GED, graduated from college while working full-time and raising her daughter, Brennan, as a single parent.

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Toolbox: e5 iPad Apps categorized and aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy

Toolbox: e5 iPad Apps categorized and aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Notice that several apps that are in the same app category (ex. screencasting: ShowMe, ScreenChomp and ExplainEverything) are represented on different levels of the Bloom’s. The explanation is that each one of the apps can be used for the different levels. It is not to say that the ShowMe app could not be used on the “Analyzing” level. Also, be aware that simply by using one of the above mentioned app DOES NOT mean that you are working on the specified thinking level. Ex. you could ask your students to use the ScreenChomp app to simply list and record themselves “remembering” facts that they previously had memorized.

Take a look at the iPad apps on YOUR iPad and to categorize these apps with the different thinking levels and THEN take the next step to SHARE your list with other educators. 


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Dyslexics in time machines and alternate realities: thought experiments on the existence of dyslexics, ‘dyslexia’ and ‘Lexism’ - Collinson - 2012 - British Journal of Special Education - Wiley Onli...

Dyslexics in time machines and alternate realities: thought experiments on the existence of dyslexics, ‘dyslexia’ and ‘Lexism’ - Collinson - 2012 - British Journal of Special Education - Wiley Onli... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

RT @SpcialNdsJungle: Dyslexics in time machines and alternate realities: thought experiments on the existence of ‘dyslexia’ and ‘Lexism’ http://t.co/89b6vDwF...
This article explores the possibility that ‘dyslexics’ can be thought of as being ‘othered’ and defined by the social norms and educational practices surrounding literacy; which can be termed ‘Lexism’. As such the author, Craig Collinson, a postgraduate academic support officer at Edge Hill University, presents ‘Lexism’ as a new concept that allows us to reconsider how dyslexics can be said to exist. In a persuasive and original article, Craig argues that dyslexics can be defined by the existence of Lexism rather than the more problematic concept of ‘dyslexia’. He seeks to achieve these ends through a series of thought experiments which suggest a different way of looking at what defines someone as dyslexic in order to suggest that when we talk of the inclusion or exclusion of dyslexic pupils we should be aware of the influence Lexism may have upon us.

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Happy Days' Henry Winkler as The Fonz: tells kids it's cool to read

Happy Days' Henry Winkler as The Fonz:  tells kids it's cool to read | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Fonz made sure schoolkids had a happy day when he dropped in for a book-reading session. Hollywood actor Henry Winkler talked to children from North Chadderton school in Oldham and Bridgewater School in Worsley, Salford, as part of the My Way! tour promoting awareness of dyslexia. The former Happy Days star is due to visit more than 100 schools across the country to help inspire children who struggle in the classroom. The father-of-three found out he was dyslexic aged 31 when he struggled to read scripts after taking on the role of cool leather-clad ‘greaser’ Arthur Fonzarelli in the 1970s American sitcom. He was awarded an honorary OBE last year for his work with children with special educational needs.

Read more at: http://menmedia.co.uk/manchestereveningnews/news/s/1581376_happy-days-as-the-fonz-tells-kids-its-cool-to-read

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Thank you @APHumanGeog for: Using Google Earth in the Math Curriculum

Thank you @APHumanGeog for: Using Google Earth in the Math Curriculum | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Real World Math: Using Google Earth in the Math Curriculum."   Back to my interdisciplinary approach to strengthening geographic education, imagine hearing that there is a Math teacher at your school using this, wouldn't you want to be a part of it?  Too often knowledge is taught within disciplinary silos; students need opportunities to make real world connections between the disciplines to breath life into how they are taught.  This site reminds me of http://www.googlelittrips.org/ which allows real world geography to be a part of literature/English classes.    


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To Help With Dyslexia, S p a c e L e t t e r s A p a r t, Study Says - U.S. News & World Report

To Help With Dyslexia, S p a c e   L e t t e r s   A p a r t, Study Says - U.S. News & World Report | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
To Help With Dyslexia, S p a c e L e t t e r s A p a r t, Study SaysU.S. News & World ReportTechnique boosted kids' reading speed by more than 20 percent and doubled text-reading accuracy, researchers say.

 

The spacing manipulation is grounded in a phenomenon known as "visual crowding" in which a letter is more difficult to identify when it is closely surrounded by other letters. This crowding, which abnormally affects those with dyslexia, hampers the letter recognition that is the foundation for all reading in alphabet-based languages.

 

"What this is telling us is that spacing clearly plays a role, but we've already known it plays a role for all readers," said Guinevere Eden, director of the Center for the Study of Learning and a professor of pediatrics at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. "It's telling us that, for dyslexic people, the problem is more critical. There is a sweet spot [of letter spacing] somewhere and everyone's sweet spot is probably different."

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Thank you @PatBassett for:TEDxCLE | Talks | 2012 | Dr. Lisa Damour

Thank you @PatBassett for:TEDxCLE | Talks | 2012 | Dr. Lisa Damour | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dr. Lisa Damour directs the Center for Research on Girls at Laurel School, maintains a private psychotherapy practice, consults to schools nationally, is a clinical instructor at Case Western Reserve University, and serves on the board of the Eating Disorders Network.

Dr. Damour is the author of numerous academic papers, chapters, editorials, and books related to education and child development. She is co-author with Dr. James Hansell of Abnormal Psychology, a widely-used college textbook and co-author with Dr. Anne Curzan of First Day to Final Grade, a handbook introducing college instructors to the art and craft of teaching. She has worked for the Yale Child Study Center and held fellowships from the Pediatric AIDS Foundation, the Bush Center for Child Development and Social Policy, and the Sadye Harwick Power Foundation.

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Common Myths about Dyslexia -

Common Myths about Dyslexia - | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Myth: Dyslexia does not exist Fact: Dyslexia is one of the most researched and documented conditions that will impact children. Over 30 years of independent, scientific, replicated, published research...
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Leagalize Dyslexia!!: Next stop: Dyslexia-ville: Huff-Post Blog

Leagalize Dyslexia!!: Next stop: Dyslexia-ville: Huff-Post Blog | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

What's missing in our increasing 'teach to the test' culture are educational programs and creative ways to target kids with different learning styles. There has been some headway to accommodate children with learning disabilities, giving them accommodations on standardized tests, but most of the general public doesn't know what dyslexia is. What it is NOT is something as simple as learning how to rearrange words that one initially sees as upside-down and backwards. "Dyslexic children's brains are wired differently; some parts having to do with reading may have a few glitches while other parts having to do with creative thinking, empathy, and analysis may work especially well," explains Sally Shaywitz on the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity website. The current Change.org "Legalize Dyslexia" petition set forth by The Yale Center is galvanizing a much-needed effort to ensure extra time on high stake tests

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Cape Elizabeth grad has 'never felt trapped' by dyslexia

Cape Elizabeth grad has 'never felt trapped' by dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
CAPE ELIZABETH — From the time he entered school, William McCarthy has seen his lessons differently.

"Dyslexia is quite a misunderstood thing on a deeper level. It is more than just switching letters," he said about the learning disability that has shaped his future studies into realms not readily understood by an average reader.

On June 10, McCarthy, 18, and his class graduated in commencement ceremonies at Fort Williams Park. In the fall, McCarthy will enter Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, with plans to become a physicist.

Ultimately, McCarthy said he would like to take theoretical "string theory" physics and make it practical for engineers to develop technology, perhaps for defense use.

"If I can also create the practicality, that would be cool, too," he said.

Lofty goals from a young man who said he could not fully read until he was in fifth grade, and continued to struggle with math problems because the textbooks were language-based.

"I might see the same page and just have more trouble decoding it," McCarthy said.

If decoding the written word has been a challenge, unlocking the workings of the universe has been a joy for McCarthy.

"I would easily get stressed out at school, so something I would do is a physics problem," he said.

McCarthy's mother, Candee Kaknes, said she has seen her son become almost euphoric when the logic of a math or physics problem reveals itself.

"I have learned so much from him everyday, so much about perseverance and how to stay grounded," she said.

While McCarthy is adept at staying grounded, his desire to learn about laws of the universe has encompassed most of his life.

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A Different Kind of Summer Reading - Babble

A Different Kind of Summer Reading - Babble | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Audio books are the cornerstone to working with kids who have dyslexia over the summer. With younger children, books can be found in “Read Along” sets where the book and CD are packaged together. As the child gets older, books and audio books are separate items.

The key to using audio books is not just having your child listen to the recording, but to have them follow along in the book while it is being read to them. By reading along, the child is connecting the sound of the word to the look of the word. This multisensory approach helps the brain connect the individual letter sounds and how those sounds work together. Using this method consistently for at least 20 minutes a day can help their reading abilities.

There are several resources available online to find audio books, including:

• Learning Ally: This site offers more than 50,000 audio books geared toward blind, dyslexic, and other kinds of users. Membership is $99 for the year.

• Audible.com: This is Amazon’s version of an audible Kindle. You buy the audio books that you want and download it to your mp3 player or eReader. Selections include The Hunger Games and Twilight, making this perfect for tweens.

• Bookshare: This is a favorite of the specialists my daughter works with — most students with a diagnosed visual, physical or learning disability can access their database with proof of their disability. Stephanie Forbis, the Assessment Specialist who tested my daughter, recommends that parents request “a cappella” versions of books from Bookshare. These books have more voice fluctuation than the traditional computer-read vocals.

My personal go-to audio book source is my local library, where many audiobooks are available to borrow for free. If your child is in a dyslexia program at school, check with her teachers, as they may have additional books and resources available.Different Kind of Summer ReadingBabbleWant to make sure your dyslexic child doesn't regress this summer? Learn how to help them develop their reading skills after school's out, on Babble.
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Top 10 iPhone/iPad Photo And Video Editing Apps For 2012 | designrfix.com

Top 10 iPhone/iPad Photo And Video Editing Apps For 2012 | designrfix.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"With hundreds of thousands of apps now available for your iPhone or iPad there’s almost nothing you can’t do with your mobile device and a little creativity. That goes for editing your photos and videos, too. We listed our top 10 here, even though we could probably expand the list significantly. Our ranking is based on functionality, usability, and reliability."


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Dyslexic Chuck Close says that art saved his life. Twice: One Face Book That Kids Are Sure to Like

Dyslexic Chuck Close says that art saved his life. Twice: One Face Book That Kids Are Sure to Like | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Chuck Close likes to say that art saved his life. Twice. When he was a kid, dyslexia left him labeled as “dumb,” so he turned to drawing to earn attention. Art came to the rescue again when he was paralyzed later in life and his determination to create helped him through rehabilitation. This dedication to art helped to develop Close’s unique style and talent, allowing him to become one of America’s most recognized modern painters and photographers.

The hurdles he’s had to overcome have been plentiful. In addition to dyslexia, he suffers from prosopagnosia, or face blindness, and the huge faces in his oversized artwork help him recognize and remember faces. What’s more, his paralysis (as a result of a collapsed spinal artery) force him to paint with a brush strapped to his wrist. Regardless, his work is stunning and highly sought after.

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Olympic torch bearer tells of battle with dyslexia

Olympic torch bearer tells of battle with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Schoolgirl Hannah Jukes has gone from coming bottom in every spelling test because of dyslexia to studying English at A-level.
Despite her own battle, the determined 17-year-old has raised more than £2,400, some of which paid for food, shelter and education for children in South Africa.

Hannah, from Cannock, found dancing saved her when her confidence was badly knocked by the condition.
She joined a cheer-leading group at Shelfield Academy in Pelsall, called Maddisons, who nominated her to be a torchbearer.
“Dancing has always been a way out of it,” she said. “Everyone has their own thing they’re meant to specialise in.”
It wasn’t until Hannah was 13 years old she was finally diagnosed with dyslexia.

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Dyslexia: Message from a Teacher who is Dyslexic

Dyslexia: Message from a Teacher who is Dyslexic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia: Message from a Teacher who is Dyslexic. Rocky Perry wrote his first book back in 2009 while he was studying Early Childhood Education at Dalton State College. 

He has always tried to do the things that are hardest for him. He learned to read and write later than most people due to his Dyslexia, which was diagnosed with in the early eighties.

Writing a book, like getting his degree, presented some unique challenges. This first book was written using Dragon Naturally Speaking speech to text software.

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OH passes law to retain 3rd graders who don't read at grade levelPat Smith: Don't punish the kids because they can't read

OH passes law to retain 3rd graders who don't read at grade levelPat Smith: Don't punish the kids because they can't read | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

To improve the teaching of reading, we’re now going to flunk third-graders that districts haven’t taught to read. Somehow, this latest magic bullet seems aimed more at the victims than the culprits. Why not target instead:

Colleges of education that don’t adequately prepare teachers. In 2006, I reviewed a national report on “What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching About Reading and What Elementary Teachers Aren’t Learning,” and it was a lot.

School Districts that purchase reading programs that work with the two-thirds of kids who can learn to read with any program and then expect these programs to also work for the one-third who need something more. Good teachers close the door and quietly supplement district-chosen programs, and conscientious parents work with their kids or hire tutors. These efforts make some programs look better than they really are.

Those teachers who are unprepared to teach decoding skills or are biased against them. They rely instead on methods they intuitively believe in rather than ones that work for all kids.

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New research by a student with dyslexia at the University of Derby: paper accepted | BPS

New research by a student with dyslexia at the University of Derby:  paper accepted | BPS | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Sufferers of dyslexia are set to benefit from new research carried out by a student at the University of Derby. Julianne Kinder, who was diagnosed with the condition after enrolling on to an Access to Higher Education course at the learning institute in 2006, her expressed surprise and joy on learning that her paper had been accepted by the British Journal of Educational Psychology.

Ms Kinder's study looked at the problems dyslexic students face when required to produce written assignments, as her own experiences highlighted the difficulties of explaining previously heard matters on paper.

She observed that dyslexia is "a disability affecting reading but it has important and less well-understood implications for writing, especially at university level where a far higher standard of writing ability is required".

James Elander, Head of the Centre for Psychological Research at the university, said the department is delighted Ms Kinder's study is to be published, describing it as an "exceptional achievement".

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Students and teachers; learners all: So You Want To Learn How To Use An IPad

Students and teachers; learners all: So You Want To Learn How To Use An IPad | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This playlist will take you through screencasts that will talk you through, step by step, the basic features of the iPad and some of the key apps that you might want to use, particularly if you work in education.


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Coolwired's comment, June 18, 2012 2:34 PM
Pass it on! :-)
Coolwired's comment, October 9, 2012 10:14 AM
You are welcome!
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Can a Daughter With Dyslexia Learn to Love Words? - New York Times (blog)

Can a Daughter With Dyslexia Learn to Love Words? - New York Times (blog) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Can a Daughter With Dyslexia Learn to Love Words?New York Times (blog)My daughter's dyslexia may mean that she never learns to share my love of language and literature. What will we share instead?

The fear I just can’t shake is that my dyslexic daughter won’t be able to learn the language that is paramount to how I have always been able to express my deepest emotions. Will she ever be able to speak the language of literacy?

I know in my heart that my little girl is going to be fine. She is funny, smart as a whip and already clearly gifted in the area of visual/spatial reasoning, as many dyslexics are. I am confident that she will work hard, and just as important, learn to embrace what makes her different.

Maybe the question is not, will my daughter speak the language that I love so well, but, will I appreciate her form of expression, be it music, art or design? Perhaps my daughter will one day help me become literate in whatever language she finds most fitting to her sense of self and her unique gifts. And I look forward to becoming fluent in it together.

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Check it out: How Long Before You Will Scoop.it Instead of Google It?

Check it out: How Long Before You Will Scoop.it Instead of Google It? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Services like Scoop.it depend on a community of millions of hardworking experts who wonder what to do with the wealth of knowledge and wisdom they have accumulated in life and are happy to share it."

 

Written by blogger Shred Pillai on the Huffington Post, this vibrant praise of Social Curation in general and Scoop.it in particular, points out the changes we're seeing in the way we look for information. From basic search, we now look more and more for meaning and context from human experts.

 

Beyond information, we want knowledge.

 

And this is what Curation is all about.

 

As he concludes: "At the end of the day, Scoop.it, which is free, is the right answer for information seekers and providers as well as the experts who like to show off their expertise."


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lelapin's comment, June 17, 2012 3:46 AM
I may be wrong but I don't see this happening any time soon.
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Words of wisdom and creativity from a dyslexic Schoolboy entrepreneur

Words of wisdom and creativity from a dyslexic Schoolboy entrepreneur | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A severely dyslexic A-Level student has launched 10 companies around the globe which he claims have generated more than £500,000 over the past four years.

Dan, from Oxshott, said he has struggled with "people not believing in him" due to the severe dyslexia and learning problems he has battled throughout his life.

But having achieved 3 A* grades and 6 As at GCSE, he credits his successes to the hurdles he has had to overcome.

He said: "I had to work hard because of my dyslexia and that work ethic was ingrained in me. I think a lot of people make excuses.

"Both my parents came from very poor backgrounds and worked their way up."

Winner of a regional marketing award for the young enterprise company he set up with peers at St John’s last year, Dan plans to take a gap year after his exams before embarking on a law degree at university.

He said: "I want to do the degree for myself because I think you get to a certain point in terms of success where it becomes a bit boring.

"I don’t think I could run my businesses day-to-day.

"You have to strike a balance. When I was 16, I was naive and just thought I would run the businesses like a young Alan Sugar. But, at the end of the day, life is to be enjoyed.

"I don’t want to be the richest man in the graveyard."

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