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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Summer Learning Loss: The Problem and Some Solutions |

Summer Learning Loss: The Problem and Some Solutions | | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A research synthesis conducted by Cooper et al. (1996) integrated 39 studies examining the effects of summer vacation on standardized achievement test scores. The 39 studies included 13 that could be included in a meta-analysis (a statistical integration) of the results. The meta-analysis indicated that summer learning loss equaled at least one month of instruction as measured by grade level equivalents on standardized test scores-on average, children’s tests scores were at least one month lower when they returned to school in fall than scores were when students left in spring.

The meta-analysis also found differences in the effect of summer vacation on different skill areas. Summer loss was more pronounced for math facts and spelling than for other tested skill areas. The explanation of this result was based on the observation that both math computation and spelling skills involve the acquisition of factual and procedural knowledge, whereas other skill areas, especially math concepts, problem solving, and reading comprehension, are conceptually based. Findings in cognitive psychology suggest that without practice, facts and procedural skills are most susceptible to forgetting (e.g., Cooper & Sweller, 1987). Summer loss was more pronounced for math overall than for reading overall. The authors speculated that children’s home environments might provide more opportunities to practice reading skills than to practice mathematics. Parents may be more attuned to the importance of reading, so they pay attention to keeping their children reading over summer.

In addition to the influence of subject area, the meta- analysis indicated that individual differences among students may also play a role. Among those examined in the studies used in the meta-analysis, neither gender, ethnicity, nor IQ appeared to have a consistent influence on summer learning loss. Family economics was also examined as an influence on what happens to children over summer. The meta-analysis revealed that all students, regardless of the resources in their home, lost roughly equal amounts of math skills over summer. However, substantial economic differences were found for reading. On some measures, middle-class children showed gains in reading achievement over summer, but disadvantaged children showed losses. Reading comprehension scores of both income groups declined, but the scores of disadvantaged students declined more. Again, the authors speculated that income differences could be related to differences in opportunities to practice and learn reading skills over summer, with more books and reading opportunities available for middle-class children (see also Alexander, Entwisle, & Olson, in press).

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Early intervention in dyslexia is key - Chicago Sun-Times

Early intervention in dyslexia is key - Chicago Sun-Times | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia, or developmental reading disorder, is an information-processing problem in the brain that makes it difficult to interpret language and symbols, such as letters. It does run in families. But it doesn’t have to limit your child’s future success and happiness. Whoopi Goldberg, Gov. Nelson Rockefeller and Dr. Toby Cosgrove (cardiac surgeon and CEO of Dr. Mike’s Cleveland Clinic) are just a few high achievers who have struggled with the condition.

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New Dyslexia Film - Left from Write

Wonderful dyslexia documentary by Irish filmmaker Feargal Lideadha. The film chronicles his journey for more information and a more positive view of dyslexia. Interviews with us, Dr. John Stein of Oxford, author Ron Davis and more. Congrats, Feargal!


Via Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com
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National Association of Independent Schools: Bassett Blog, 2012/05

National Association of Independent Schools: Bassett Blog, 2012/05 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Let’s try something for the faculty that the kids would love for “summer reading” — making the “reading” have a social networking context or digital delivery component. Thus, Plan B for Summer Reading for Faculty is Five Non-conventional Summer Assignments + One Book.

For Faculty: (choose three of five options):

 

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2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter: From the Publishers of 2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter

2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter: From the Publishers of 2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Twice-Exceptional Newsletter 25 May 2012: http://t.co/e94utdhh #2e #gtvoice...AD/HD AND SUMMER VACATION---provides "summer survival tips for parents of children with AD/HD." Covered are topics such as structure, avoiding the "summer slide," summer camp options, and whether to take a break from meds. 

LD RESOURCE. A special ed teacher, as a project for course in special ed law, created a website called Special Education Nation. The site provides information on the 13 legally-recognized disabilities in the U.S., including specific learning disabilities, ASD, and the umbrella category of "other health impairments" into which AD/HD falls. For each disability the site provides information such as a definition, causes, characteristics, instructional strategies, and the effect on adolescents. 

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Kasich Calls Cleveland Schools Reform Meeting 'Fantastic' |

Kasich Calls Cleveland Schools Reform Meeting 'Fantastic' | | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- CLEVELAND, Ohio — Lawmakers who are often at odds in Columbus found a common ground in Cleveland Friday regarding Mayor Frank Jackson’s plan to transform the still-troubled Cleveland public school system.
“We are looking forward to taking this to the next level, and that is to make sure we pass a levy in the city. We have not passed one since 1996, and our children deserve it. They deserve it,” said Sen. Nina Tuner, D-Cleveland.
Turner, along with Gov. John Kasich, and Democratic and Republican lawmakers, including Speaker of the House William Batchelder, R-Medina spoke in favor of Mayor Frank Jackson’s plan to reinvent the still-troubled Cleveland Metropolitan School District.
“This is fantastic what happened here. It is just so fantastic. It’s a gold medal for cooperation. But you know, the Lord is smiling today,” said Gov. Kasich.

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Digital Textbooks That Integrate Formative Assessment - District Administration Magazine

Digital Textbooks That Integrate Formative Assessment - District Administration Magazine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

For Collier County (Fla.) Public Schools, an urban district of 51 schools equipped with document cameras, interactive whiteboards, projectors and fiber-optic Internet connections in all classrooms, adopting digital textbooks made perfect sense.

After using Discovery Education products for the last decade, CCPS chose the company’s new series of digital textbooks, dubbed Techbook, for all elementary and middle school science classes. The digital textbooks were funded by cutting back to class sets of traditional textbooks. According to Curt Witthoff, curriculum coordinator for K12 science and environmental education, Techbook has the ability to build formative assessments quickly, administer them, and use the data to inform kids about what they need to do to master a concept, which is one reason CCPS chose this digital textbook.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Daniela Pscheida: A New Paradigm of Knowledge?

Daniela Pscheida: A New Paradigm of Knowledge? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Daniela Pscheida in her presentation on A new paradigm of knowledge?

 

This research reveals the importance of participation and collaboration among not only the researchers and academics, but the embracing of a participative and collaborative culture which extends to general public and citizens of interests. The wikipedia and Citizen projects were just some of the examples of pioneer work illustrating the importance of keeping knowledge updated with a wider authorship, with its content being “editable, though controllable or manageable”. This requires a paradigm shift of “Community Building” and “information sharing” when creating new and emergent knowledge.

 

 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Good Jobs: Why Innovation, Location And Education Matter Most - Forbes

Good Jobs: Why Innovation, Location And Education Matter Most - Forbes | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new book was released today by University of California at Berkeley Economics Professor and Fulbright Fellow, Enrico Bonetti, titled The New Geography Of Jobs. This young economist’s research has some surprising news about jobs, and it starts with where we live.

The following is an interview with Professor Bonetti; ten questions about why innovation, location and education matter most.

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Mississippi Gov signs New law to help children with dyslexia

Mississippi Gov signs New law to help children with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Joseph South spent hours on first-grade reading assignments that should have taken minutes.

Before his parents and teachers in Clinton Public Schools discovered he had dyslexia, South felt like learning to read was a mountain he couldn't climb.

Now 17, the incoming senior at Canton Academy said he's glad that newly approved legislation will help more kids overcome reading, writing and spelling challenges.

"No other child should have to go through the beat down that comes with failing grades," he said Wednesday at a Capitol news conference.

South was at the conference to watch Gov. Phil Bryant sign a bill that will give dyslexic students in first through sixth grades the opportunity to move to other public or nonpublic schools employing dyslexia therapists.

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inClass - free app for managing your notes, courses, schedules and homework.

inClass - free app for managing your  notes, courses, schedules and homework. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This is a great free app for managing your courses. You can keep track of schedules and classes, but best of all you can take notes using text, voice, images or video.


Via Nik Peachey
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Treating Reading Disabilities: Teach in a direct, explicit, and systematic way.

Treating Reading Disabilities: Teach in a direct, explicit, and systematic way. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For children with dyslexia, addressing reading weaknesses requires a systematic approach. www. Smartkidswithld.org (Treating dyslexia?As with many learning disabilities, there is a continuum of dyslexia, with each child having his or her own unique learning profile.

In order to instruct these children properly, teachers must understand each student’s particular challenges, have a working knowledge of the rules of the English language, and know how to teach reading in a direct, individualized, explicit, and systematic way.

Reading is the product of two essential activities: decoding (the ability to understand how the letters of the alphabet represent the sounds we speak) and comprehension. The National Reading Panel has identified five core components of a comprehensive reading curriculum—phonemic awareness, explicit phonics, fluency, text comprehension, and vocabulary.

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The Who Doctors: Detecting dyslexia and treating it early | Deseret News

The Who Doctors: Detecting dyslexia and treating it early | Deseret News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Q: I think my 4-year-old son might have dyslexia; my dad had it. How can I be sure, and what should I do if he does?

Not long ago, the conventional wisdom about testing a child for reading problems was to wait until second grade (age 8), because that's when reading skills get up to speed — or not — and when dyslexia could be diagnosed.

Things have changed. Studies show it's possible to identify children as young as 3 who are at risk for dyslexia, and the chance of a child succeeding is much greater if he or she receives early treatment!

Simple visual attention tasks that ask a child to pick out certain symbols and filter relevant from irrelevant information can indicate processing problems. And MRIs can help confirm a diagnosis by identifying differences in brain activity in regions that detect and discriminate between speech sounds, which seem to be precursors to reading problems.

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Dyslexia: Legislation a plus for Miss. - Jackson Clarion Ledger

Dyslexia: Legislation a plus for Miss. - Jackson Clarion Ledger | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Jackson, Mississippi; One of the good pieces of legislation to come out of this year's session was signed into law by Gov. Phil Bryant.

It requires kindergartners or first- graders to be tested for dyslexia, a reading disorder that occurs when the brain does not properly recognize and process certain symbols like letters in the alphabet.

The new law also gives dyslexic students in the first six grades the ability to move to a new public or non-public school if it is determined the student can be better served by the transfer.

A separate bill also signed by Bryant creates a scholarship program for people who want to study dyslexia therapy.

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Actor Jeremy Brett;The ultimate Sherlock Holmes,was an "academic disaster" due to dyslexia

Actor Jeremy Brett;The ultimate Sherlock Holmes,was an "academic disaster" due to dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

Peter Jeremy William Huggins, later to be known as Jeremy Brett, was born to Henry William; the decorated Lord Lieutenant of Warwickshire, and Elizabeth Edith Huggins; from the world-famous chocolatier Cadbury family, on November 3, 1933, in Berkswell Grange, Warwickshire, England.
Educated at the prestigious English Public School Eton, he excelled at singing and was a member of the college choir, despite having been born with a speech impediment that was corrected later by surgery as a teenager. By his own words, he claimed to have been an “academic disaster” however, suffering learning difficulties that he attributed to dyslexia. Drawn to drama, his father expressed a desire for him not to use the family name on the stage as a student, feeling acting was a dubious profession, and demanded he should change his name for the sake of the family honour. Jeremy therefore took his stage name from the label in his first suit, “Brett and Co.”


Via Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com
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Education experts disagree on importance of school class size; but quality teachers make all the difference!

Education experts disagree on importance of school class size; but quality teachers make all the difference! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When Greg Sumlin looks at the incoming kindergarten class at East Elementary School in Littleton, he sees a group of English learners who need immediate, intensive instruction — in small classes where teachers can give them individual attention.

Generally, research into the effect of class size on achievement has found that it can have significant impact in kindergarten to second grade, though findings are mixed after that. But large increases in class size suggest certain intuitive results — challenges in classroom management, less individual attention, a reluctance to assign homework — that could affect student performance.
On the other hand, the "fashionable" research, as Klopfenstein calls it, zeroes in on teacher effectiveness as a more cost-effective remedy than hiring more teachers to reduce class size.
"If a teacher doesn't do anything differently, teaches the same way big or small, then I don't think less is better," Klopfenstein said. "It's just more expensive. If they're really an effective teacher, then what they're doing with 18 kids could probably be done just as effectively with 27."
That's a sentiment repeated among high-level administrators presented with the issue of class size. They almost immediately shift the conversation to effective teachers.

Read more: Education experts disagree on importance of school class size - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_20720013/education-experts-disagree-importance-school-class-size#ixzz1wBaR6A7e
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

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War on Wisdom: Barry Schwartz, Prof. of Social Theory and Social Action at Swarthmore

War on Wisdom:  Barry Schwartz,  Prof. of Social Theory and Social Action at Swarthmore | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

There are various ways to do the right thing and most of them are flawed. One can meticulously adhere to rules, for example. Or eagerly perform for various incentives, financial or otherwise. We can avoid the sticks and savor the carrots.
And yet, as Barry Schwartz, the Dorwin Cartwright Professor of Social Theory and Social Action at Swarthmore College told the large audience gathered for his “Bring the Family Address” at the twenty-fourth annual convention of the Association for Psychological Science, within each of these conventional forms of assuring that the “right” thing is done, reside a small minefield of problems that have crippled us as a society.
The author of the 2005 best seller “The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less”, who is responsible for bringing to our consciousness the fact that too many choices are not good for us, pointed out another paradox in his approach to doing the right thing.
“This talk is about how we have too little choice,” he said. “ As a society we are giving people choices when then don’t need them and depriving them of choices where they do.”
After assuring the audience that one didn’t need to know a “single thing about psychology to understand and disagree” with his talk, he explained that America was “broken.” 

All the most fundamental institutions of a functioning society—healthcare, education, criminal justice, banking, politics– “do not work the way that they should.” Our carrots and sticks seem to miss the point, or make things worse. To resolve the problem one need only return to the ancient Greeks. “We need virtue,” he said. “A virtue that Aristotle referred to as ‘practical wisdom.’” It is very simple, really. Practical wisdom is “the will to do the right thing and the skill to figure out what the right thing is. “


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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The “Core” of the Common Core State Standards:oral language provides the foundation for literacy

The “Core” of the Common Core State Standards:oral language provides the foundation for literacy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
With the adoption of the Common Core State Standards, how do educators provide effective interventions to help students with identified disabilities, learning challenges, who are at risk, or on IEPs to meet grade level standards?

Provide oral language development interventions
Support interrelationships between reading, writing, speaking, listening, and language
Collaborate with SLPs, teachers, specialists families and administrators
At the “core” of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) is oral language development because oral language provides the foundation for literacy. The CCSS were designed to prepare students for success in college & careers and ultimately to be able to compete in a global, technology-driven economy. In order to ensure this success, students must be literate – or, competent in speaking, listening, reading, writing and thinking. The link between literacy and language development is the “discourse” level of language which is made up of narration, conversation and exposition. It is within discourse that the Story Grammar Marker® (narratives), Six-Second-Stories® (conversation) and ThemeMaker® (expository text) can provide the most effective intervention to bridge the gap for those students with identified disabilities or for those at risk of not meeting grade level standards. The CCSS call for students to develop “Communicative Competence” which is putting together words, phrases, and sentences to create conversations, speeches, email messages, articles and books. Students are required throughout ALL standards to (using academic language) interpret, argue, analyze, organize, conclude and persuade through conversation, discussion, writing and debate. There is also a strong emphasis on critical thinking, problem solving and collaboration with peers. In order for students to meet these requirements, oral language development – particularly at the discourse level is essential.

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PDF Text to Speech App - for Forms!

 Save to PDF, Text-to-Speech (TTS), PDF form filling, contract signing, file transfer, annotation, file scanning, and fast rendering speed. With PDF Connoisseur, your slim and space saving iPad makes a wonderful replacement for your bulky briefcase.

Spending time reading documents is not only tedious, but is also harmful to your eyes. PDF Connoisseur takes care of this problem by introducing the TTS feature:
✔ The built-in voice engine reads out loudly and clearly your selected text in the language of your choice.
✔ Let your ears do the reading and deal with multiple tasks at the same time.
✔ Natural sounding voice
✔ Ability to adjust the TTS voice speed.
✔ Six languages supported: English, French, German, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean
✔ Two reading modes: Read selected text/read a PDF page
✔ Your exclusive language self-study tool
PDF Connoisseur takes your mobile reading experience to the next level. It literally reads for you!


Via Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com
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History Channel documentary: The Art of War: Sun Tzu: As applied to modern history.

History Channel documentary: The Art of War: Sun Tzu:  As applied to modern history. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Art of War is an ancient Chinese military treatise that is attributed to Sun Tzu (also referred to as "Sunzi" and "Sun Wu"), a high ranking military general and strategist during the late Spring and Autumn period (some scholars believe that the Art of War was not completed until the subsequent Warring States period. Composed of 13 chapters, each of which is devoted to one aspect of warfare, it is said to be the definitive work on military strategies and tactics of its time, and is still read for its military insights.
The Art of War is one of the oldest and most successful books on military strategy in the world. It has been the most famous and influential of China's Seven Military Classics: "for the last two thousand years it remained the most important military treatise in Asia, where even the common people knew it by name.It has had an influence on Eastern military thinking, business tactics, and beyond.

Sun Tzu emphasized the importance of positioning in military strategy, and that the decision to position an army must be based on both objective conditions in the physical environment and the subjective beliefs of other, competitive actors in that environment. He thought that strategy was not planning in the sense of working through an established list, but rather that it requires quick and appropriate responses to changing conditions. Planning works in a controlled environment, but in a changing environment, competing plans collide, creating unexpected situations.


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Jay Leno is Dyslexic | The Power Of Dyslexia

Jay Leno is Dyslexic | The Power Of Dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Funnyman Jay Leno is a talk show host and comedian, loved by millions of American viewers since his debut on the comedy circuit in the 1970s. Leno rose to fame with cameo appearances in films and two hit talk shows: “The Jay Leno Show”, and “The Tonight Show With Jay Leno.” His face is universally recognized, and his controversial private life is constantly appearing in supermarket tabloids and on entertainment news. Yet unbeknownst by most, Leno has struggled with the learning disorder, dyslexia, since childhood.Born James Douglas Muir Leno in 1950, Leno's father was an insurance salesman and his mother stayed at home to take care of her two sons.

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Gov. Bryant shares own story of struggles with dyslexia

Gov. Bryant shares own story of struggles with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant signed a bill Wednesday that requires kindergartners or first-graders to be tested for dyslexia, a reading disorder that can sometimes go undiagnosed for years and leave children struggling to learn.The matter is intensely personal for Bryant. He was in fourth grade before a caring teacher discovered that dyslexia was the reason he saw scrambled words and had trouble putting the right sounds with letters that appeared in print.

"I repeated the third grade. What a difficult, horrible experience that was for a young child," Bryant, 57, recalled during a bill signing ceremony in his Capitol office.

On display was a small framed photograph of Josephine Henley, the fourth- grade teacher who helped him at south Jackson's Marshall Elementary School.

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Jackson, MS: Bryant signs laws on dyslexia, school ratings and veteran's IDs

Jackson, MS: Bryant signs laws on dyslexia, school ratings and veteran's IDs | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
JACKSON, MS (WLBT) -
Flanked by supporters of the respective new laws, Governor Phil Bryant sealed with his signature what he calls important steps in combating an educational obstacle.

"I believe this is some of the most significant legislation that we've had for education in many, many years," said Bryant.

Two pieces of legislation are aimed at increasing services for students with dyslexia. The first sets up a scholarship program for college students who wish to pursue a master's degree in dyslexia therapy.

"Hundreds of thousands of students are out there struggling with this," said Bryant.

The other bill establishes screening guidelines for kindergarten and first grade students and allows first through sixth graders with dyslexia to attend schools with dyslexia-specific instruction. One such school is in Petal, known as the 3D School, led by executive director Cena Holifield.

"Dyslexia affects ten to fifteen percent and we do not have enough therapists in the state to meet the needs of these children and we don't have enough programs in our schools," said Holifield.

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LEARNING FOR EACH OTHER | To be an adult with dyslexia is often a very isolating experience °

LEARNING FOR EACH OTHER | To be an adult with dyslexia is often a very isolating experience ° | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

To be an adult with dyslexia is often a very isolating experience. Once people finish their formal education, there is no longer a support structure outside of the family. To counter this isolation, two and a half years ago, a group of adults with dyslexia and similar language based learning differences began meeting to explore the relationship between their dyslexia and professional success by sharing compensating strategies and discussing the ways we have been able to advance in our careers. The group – “Professionals with Dyslexia” – has evolved and plays different roles for participants. Some people who attend the meetings have developed mentoring relationships, others have been inspired to go back to school, and some simply enjoy the opportunity to discuss our shared experience. Participants range in age and backgrounds from recent college graduates just entering the workforce to retirees, and include teachers, accountants, artists, lawyers, entrepreneurs and scientists. What we continue to learn from each other is that our dyslexia has many positive impacts.

On the evening of Thursday, June 7, 2012, Steven Walker, President and CEO of New England Wood Pellet will speak about how his dyslexia contributed to ability to build a tremendously successful company at the forefront of the biomass energy industry. Mr. Walker was featured in the recent HBO documentary Journey Into Dyslexia. For more information click here or contact mabidaevent@seyfarth.com.

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Like an audible Instapaper, SpokenLayer lets you listen to the Web

Like an audible Instapaper, SpokenLayer lets you listen to the Web | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Plenty of startups give you new and different ways to read content on the Web, but NY-based SpokenLayer wants to give you a way to hear it.

Launched Monday as an iPhone app, SpokenLayer takes text articles online and either gives them to a human to read and record, or it uses text-to-speech synthesis to meet instant demand in a matter of seconds.

Founder and CEO Will Mayo said he created the app to address his own difficulties growing up with dyslexia.

“It was a real problem for me,” he said. “I could never learn by reading. I had to learn by listening.” Access to audible versions of books and textbooks, he added, helped him get through college and complete a graduate degree in engineering.

On stage at the TechCrunch Disrupt conference in New York, he announced the app’s launch, as well as partnerships with publishers including The Atlantic, National Journal, TechCrunch and Endgadget. Later, he told me that he’s also been in touch with the International Dyslexia Association and a major K-12 publisher about applying it in educational contexts.

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