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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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You Don't 'Build A Team,' The Team Builds the Enterprise - Forbes

You Don't 'Build A Team,' The Team Builds the Enterprise - Forbes | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Speaking at the University of Pittsburgh earlier this year, Ashoka founder Bill Drayton expanded on that theme of organic teams creating change – the antithesis of traditional top-down management. “In this world you have to have a very fluid, constantly changing, widely interconnected team of teams,” he said. “The old institution can’t play that game. Those few people at the top aren’t enough; you need everyone to play this game.”

My friend Mario Morino, founder of Venture Philanthropy Partners and the Morino Institute and the author of Leap of Reason: Managing to Outcomes in an Era of Scarcity, which asks nonprofits to take a hard look at results, is a powerful voice on the role of flexible and open leadership in building social ventures. In a recent Q&A with Jean Case, president of the Case Foundation, Morino said that while being “fearless” can and should power the pursuit of great ideas, allowing for the leadership of others is key to building the venture: “In my business and philanthropic life I have consistently done what some would regard as bold or even on the edge: I have sought to recruit leaders to my boards, advisory groups, and management teams who know more than I do and from whom I can learn … being able to recruit outstanding talent—talent that could (and should) take me out of a central decision-making role with the organization—is essential. I believe leaders of organizations have to be fearless in recruiting and/or developing the strongest talent they can for the boards and organization—even when that talent is better than they are.”

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The Innovative Educator: A Friendly Guide to Deploying iPads at Your School

The Innovative Educator: A Friendly Guide to Deploying iPads at Your School | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...Deploying iPads at any kind of scale is just short of maddening. While the process of tapping around to install one app on one iPad isn’t too bad, installing a dozen apps on hundreds iPads isn’t a particularly appealing way to spend a month. If you are going to deploy iPads at scale, you need a strategy. You need a battle plan. In addition, you will also need to stay hydrated. I don’t think I’ve discovered the silver bullet, but I’ll share some of my experiences with you in order to, hopefully, shorten the learning curve.
First, kindly allow me to give you some background. I am the technology coordinator at The Scholars’ Academy, a public school in New York City. This year, we piloted a one-to-one iPad program in the seventh grade. We also have several smaller deployments—including two class sets in the eighth grade, a half-class set for each department in the high school, and a iPad for each teacher. Next year, we’re doubling down and expanding our pilot to include one-to-one iPads in the eighth grade and an increased deployment in the high school. For the sake of brevity and due to fact that the New York City Department of Education haven’t worked out a process for purchasing apps, I’m going only going to cover basic setup and the installation of free apps. In addition, I will be completely ignoring the Assign tab as it requires that you have a Mac OS X Lion Server in place and configured. I do, but many do not.
Consider this a freshman level tutorial. We can cover more advance topics at a later date, if you’re interested. 
On paper, Lion Server should work. It might be my school’s Byzantine network setup, it might be false promises and half-hearted attempts (I’m looking at you iCloud), or it might just be me, but I’ve never gotten it to play nicely with our fleet. My current strategy involves using another tool from Apple called Apple Configurator, which was quietly released alongside the new iPad in March of 2012...."


Via Tom Perran
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Looking for STEM apps? Here's a top 50 list for iPad from OnlineUniversities.com

Looking for STEM apps? Here's a top 50 list for iPad from OnlineUniversities.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK, N.C. — Science, technology, engineering and math are getting as boost from applications - lots of them.

To help educators, parents and students find some of the top ones, OnlineUniversities.com has published their top 50 iPad apps for STEM.
“Despite early doubts, the iPad has proven to be an incredibly valuable tool for education, both in the classroom and in homes around America, according to a OU blog post dated May 30. “By offering students, from elementary school all the way up to the university level, the chance to do some hands-on learning, exploring, and sometimes even educational gaming, the device makes education fun and exciting, something that isn’t always easy to do.”
Online Universities is an online resource for students interested in going to college online. Their goal is to assist students in finding the best online university that fits the needs and demands of today’s student.
Pushing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education is more important than ever. Educators and parents can help get kids interested and perhaps even hooked on STEM no matter their age with the help of the iPad and the myriad great educational applications it offers.
Below is the list of best applications for STEM education as noted by Online Universities, and with selections that work for students of all ages and abilities:


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Bookshare or Learning Ally: text access solutions for students with ...

Bookshare or Learning Ally: text access solutions for students with ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Does your child's disability interfere with learning from class textbooks or reading independently for pleasure? Bookshare and Learning Ally (formerly Recordings for the Blind & Dyslexic) offer solutions for eligible students.
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IDA Updates “Dyslexia Basics” Fact Sheet | Dyslexia Tutor: News ...

IDA Updates “Dyslexia Basics” Fact Sheet | Dyslexia Tutor: News ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
How prevalent is dyslexia? According to the fact sheet, about 13-14% of the nation’s students have a handicapping condition; one half of all students who qualify for special education (6-7 %) are classified as having a learning disability (LD). And 85 % of those students have a primary learning disability in reading and language processing. But bear in mind that many more people — perhaps as many as 15-20% of the population as a whole — have some of the symptoms of dyslexia.

The impact of dyslexia is different for each individual and can be more or less severe. Some individuals manage to learn early reading and spelling tasks, but may later experience debilitating problems when more complex language skills are required. People with dyslexia can also have problems with spoken language. Additionally, self-esteem issues can develop, adding stress and discouragement to the mix.

Treating dyslexia: IDA feels that there is no benefit to delaying intervention, as many schools are wont to do. Parents should know that at any point they have the right to request a comprehensive evaluation under the IDEA law, whether or not the student is currently receiving “teach-first-then see” RTI instruction. Comprehensive evaluation includes intellectual and academic achievement testing, as well as an assessment of critical underlying language skills (listening and expressive language skills, phonological awareness, and rapid naming skills).

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Cape Elizabeth grad has 'never felt trapped' by dyslexia

Cape Elizabeth grad has 'never felt trapped' by dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
CAPE ELIZABETH — From the time he entered school, William McCarthy has seen his lessons differently.

"Dyslexia is quite a misunderstood thing on a deeper level. It is more than just switching letters," he said about the learning disability that has shaped his future studies into realms not readily understood by an average reader.

On June 10, McCarthy, 18, and his class graduated in commencement ceremonies at Fort Williams Park. In the fall, McCarthy will enter Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Massachusetts, with plans to become a physicist.

Ultimately, McCarthy said he would like to take theoretical "string theory" physics and make it practical for engineers to develop technology, perhaps for defense use.

"If I can also create the practicality, that would be cool, too," he said.

Lofty goals from a young man who said he could not fully read until he was in fifth grade, and continued to struggle with math problems because the textbooks were language-based.

"I might see the same page and just have more trouble decoding it," McCarthy said.

If decoding the written word has been a challenge, unlocking the workings of the universe has been a joy for McCarthy.

"I would easily get stressed out at school, so something I would do is a physics problem," he said.

McCarthy's mother, Candee Kaknes, said she has seen her son become almost euphoric when the logic of a math or physics problem reveals itself.

"I have learned so much from him everyday, so much about perseverance and how to stay grounded," she said.

While McCarthy is adept at staying grounded, his desire to learn about laws of the universe has encompassed most of his life.

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A Different Kind of Summer Reading - Babble

A Different Kind of Summer Reading - Babble | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Audio books are the cornerstone to working with kids who have dyslexia over the summer. With younger children, books can be found in “Read Along” sets where the book and CD are packaged together. As the child gets older, books and audio books are separate items.

The key to using audio books is not just having your child listen to the recording, but to have them follow along in the book while it is being read to them. By reading along, the child is connecting the sound of the word to the look of the word. This multisensory approach helps the brain connect the individual letter sounds and how those sounds work together. Using this method consistently for at least 20 minutes a day can help their reading abilities.

There are several resources available online to find audio books, including:

• Learning Ally: This site offers more than 50,000 audio books geared toward blind, dyslexic, and other kinds of users. Membership is $99 for the year.

• Audible.com: This is Amazon’s version of an audible Kindle. You buy the audio books that you want and download it to your mp3 player or eReader. Selections include The Hunger Games and Twilight, making this perfect for tweens.

• Bookshare: This is a favorite of the specialists my daughter works with — most students with a diagnosed visual, physical or learning disability can access their database with proof of their disability. Stephanie Forbis, the Assessment Specialist who tested my daughter, recommends that parents request “a cappella” versions of books from Bookshare. These books have more voice fluctuation than the traditional computer-read vocals.

My personal go-to audio book source is my local library, where many audiobooks are available to borrow for free. If your child is in a dyslexia program at school, check with her teachers, as they may have additional books and resources available.Different Kind of Summer ReadingBabbleWant to make sure your dyslexic child doesn't regress this summer? Learn how to help them develop their reading skills after school's out, on Babble.
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Top 10 iPhone/iPad Photo And Video Editing Apps For 2012 | designrfix.com

Top 10 iPhone/iPad Photo And Video Editing Apps For 2012 | designrfix.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"With hundreds of thousands of apps now available for your iPhone or iPad there’s almost nothing you can’t do with your mobile device and a little creativity. That goes for editing your photos and videos, too. We listed our top 10 here, even though we could probably expand the list significantly. Our ranking is based on functionality, usability, and reliability."


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Dyslexic Chuck Close says that art saved his life. Twice: One Face Book That Kids Are Sure to Like

Dyslexic Chuck Close says that art saved his life. Twice: One Face Book That Kids Are Sure to Like | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Chuck Close likes to say that art saved his life. Twice. When he was a kid, dyslexia left him labeled as “dumb,” so he turned to drawing to earn attention. Art came to the rescue again when he was paralyzed later in life and his determination to create helped him through rehabilitation. This dedication to art helped to develop Close’s unique style and talent, allowing him to become one of America’s most recognized modern painters and photographers.

The hurdles he’s had to overcome have been plentiful. In addition to dyslexia, he suffers from prosopagnosia, or face blindness, and the huge faces in his oversized artwork help him recognize and remember faces. What’s more, his paralysis (as a result of a collapsed spinal artery) force him to paint with a brush strapped to his wrist. Regardless, his work is stunning and highly sought after.

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Olympic torch bearer tells of battle with dyslexia

Olympic torch bearer tells of battle with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Schoolgirl Hannah Jukes has gone from coming bottom in every spelling test because of dyslexia to studying English at A-level.
Despite her own battle, the determined 17-year-old has raised more than £2,400, some of which paid for food, shelter and education for children in South Africa.

Hannah, from Cannock, found dancing saved her when her confidence was badly knocked by the condition.
She joined a cheer-leading group at Shelfield Academy in Pelsall, called Maddisons, who nominated her to be a torchbearer.
“Dancing has always been a way out of it,” she said. “Everyone has their own thing they’re meant to specialise in.”
It wasn’t until Hannah was 13 years old she was finally diagnosed with dyslexia.

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Dyslexia: Message from a Teacher who is Dyslexic

Dyslexia: Message from a Teacher who is Dyslexic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia: Message from a Teacher who is Dyslexic. Rocky Perry wrote his first book back in 2009 while he was studying Early Childhood Education at Dalton State College. 

He has always tried to do the things that are hardest for him. He learned to read and write later than most people due to his Dyslexia, which was diagnosed with in the early eighties.

Writing a book, like getting his degree, presented some unique challenges. This first book was written using Dragon Naturally Speaking speech to text software.

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OH passes law to retain 3rd graders who don't read at grade levelPat Smith: Don't punish the kids because they can't read

OH passes law to retain 3rd graders who don't read at grade levelPat Smith: Don't punish the kids because they can't read | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

To improve the teaching of reading, we’re now going to flunk third-graders that districts haven’t taught to read. Somehow, this latest magic bullet seems aimed more at the victims than the culprits. Why not target instead:

Colleges of education that don’t adequately prepare teachers. In 2006, I reviewed a national report on “What Education Schools Aren’t Teaching About Reading and What Elementary Teachers Aren’t Learning,” and it was a lot.

School Districts that purchase reading programs that work with the two-thirds of kids who can learn to read with any program and then expect these programs to also work for the one-third who need something more. Good teachers close the door and quietly supplement district-chosen programs, and conscientious parents work with their kids or hire tutors. These efforts make some programs look better than they really are.

Those teachers who are unprepared to teach decoding skills or are biased against them. They rely instead on methods they intuitively believe in rather than ones that work for all kids.

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New research by a student with dyslexia at the University of Derby: paper accepted | BPS

New research by a student with dyslexia at the University of Derby:  paper accepted | BPS | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Sufferers of dyslexia are set to benefit from new research carried out by a student at the University of Derby. Julianne Kinder, who was diagnosed with the condition after enrolling on to an Access to Higher Education course at the learning institute in 2006, her expressed surprise and joy on learning that her paper had been accepted by the British Journal of Educational Psychology.

Ms Kinder's study looked at the problems dyslexic students face when required to produce written assignments, as her own experiences highlighted the difficulties of explaining previously heard matters on paper.

She observed that dyslexia is "a disability affecting reading but it has important and less well-understood implications for writing, especially at university level where a far higher standard of writing ability is required".

James Elander, Head of the Centre for Psychological Research at the university, said the department is delighted Ms Kinder's study is to be published, describing it as an "exceptional achievement".

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Virginia Commonwealth Univ. School of Ed Ruth Harris Endowed Professorship in Dyslexia Studies -

Virginia Commonwealth Univ. School of Ed Ruth Harris Endowed Professorship in Dyslexia Studies - | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Established in 2007 and endowed in 2010, the Ruth Harris Endowed Professorship in Dyslexia Studies seeks to enhance the work in the field of language learning and reading disabilities, with a focus on dyslexia. It is the first endowed professorship for the VCU School of Education (see article in The Bridge, Spring 2011)

Paul J. Gerber, Ph.D., is the current Ruth Harris Professor of Dyslexia Studies. He is a professor in the Department of Special Education and Disability Policy. The professorship supports his research and work with doctoral students pursuing careers in dyslexia studies, and sponsors an annual lecture by nationally prominent researchers in the area of dyslexia education and related fields.

Ruth S. Harris, M.Ed., is a former educator and noted dyslexia expert. She established with her husband, Dr. Louis S. Harris, a family foundation to support research and training in dyslexia and biomedical sciences. Mrs. Harris served as Academic Coordinator at Riverside School for 13 years and currently serves the school in the capacity of Academic Consultant.

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Students: What should you read this summer? Just ask this flowchart

Students: What should you read this summer? Just ask this flowchart | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The website http://www.teach.com offers a handy flowchart that lets users shift through 101 titles and find one to match their interests.

 

 With research finding that children who do not read over the summer may lose up to three months of reading progress, it’s important to encourage your students to pick up a few books during the hot months ahead.

To help encourage high school students to find a book of their choice, we’ve compiled a list of 101 books to kick off your learners’ summer reading. Interested in finding fiction vs. non-fiction books? Would you like to find classical or contemporary fiction? Intrigued by survival books? Tales of war? We have them all and many more to choose from! Follow our chart of top picks and peruse the different categories until you find something that’s a perfect fit!

 


Via Mr. David Burton, Seth Dixon
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Free LD Checklist from Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Director of LD Resources, NCLD

Free LD Checklist from Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Director of LD Resources, NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Download A Free Learning Disabilities Checklist (Learning Differences can be subtle and hard to see sometimes - here's a great free checklist to help ~ http://t.co/Me0yep9C...)...

The checklist is designed as a helpful guide and not as a tool to pinpoint specific learning disabilities. The more characteristics you check, the more likely that the individual described is at risk for (or shows signs of) learning disabilities. When filling out this form, think about the person’s behavior over at least the past six months. And when you’re done, don’t wait to seek assistance from school personnel or other professionals. Sheldon H. Horowitz, Ed.D. Director of LD Resources & Essential Information, NCLD Learning Disabilities Checklist Domains and Behaviors Areas with a box ( indicates a characteristic is more likely to apply at that stage of life. Check all that apply. Demonstrates

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Do Charter Schools enroll children with Special education needs? CER Rebuts GAO Charter Report

Do Charter Schools enroll children with Special education needs? CER Rebuts GAO Charter Report | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Charter schools across the country, and in most individual states, enroll a smaller percentage of students with disabilities than traditional public schools, though the factors behind those disparities remain unclear, a new report from a federal investigative agency concludes.
The report from the Government Accountability Office, released late Tuesday, says some charter schools may be discouraging students with disabilities from enrolling or denying them admission, a charge that has been periodically levied at the independent public schools over the years.
But the GAO also explains that much of the information it could gather on that point is anecdotal, and that other factors are likely at work—such as individual families deciding that charter school with distinct missions or academic approaches are not the right fit for children with specific needs.
In other cases, the decision about whether to place special-needs students in a charter school may not belong to individual charters, but rather to school districts, the report said. State funding formulas can also influence whether students with disabilities end up in charters.
"[T]here are no comprehensive data to determine the extent to which charter schools may be discouraging students with disabilities from enrolling or the extent to which such practices actually contribute to differences in enrollment levels," the GAO states.
In a letter released with the report, U.S. Department of Education officials said they were planning to release new guidance to charter schools on their obligations to serve students with disabilities.

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Nonprofits Help 'Turn the Page' to a Brighter Future With $693,000 in 'Verizon Reads' Grants

Nonprofits Help 'Turn the Page' to a Brighter Future With $693,000 in 'Verizon Reads' Grants | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

BALTIMORE, June 21, 2012

 

"-- Creating portable classrooms to bring the joy of reading to the community. Supporting adult basic and English literacy programs. Helping students reduce summer learning loss. Teaching computer literacy skills. And providing tutoring services to children with dyslexia. Nonprofits in Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia that provide these important services will be able to do even more, thanks to nearly $693,000 in funding grants from Verizon Reads.

Verizon Reads, an initiative funded through the Verizon Foundation, supports nonprofit organizations devoted to technology, literacy and educational programs for children, adolescents and adults".

"In today's global society, reading and comprehension skills are fundamental building blocks for a person's success in work and life," said Anthony A. Lewis, Verizon's Mid-Atlantic region vice president of state government affairs. "These Verizon Reads grants help strengthen the region's nonprofit organizations that work tirelessly to provide both youth and adults with the tools and training they need to improve their education, achieve their goals and contribute to their communities.

"Verizon is a global solutions provider in communications, broadband and entertainment," said Lewis. "We also are committed to a philosophy of shared success, in which we work to provide solutions that improve the communities we serve and create opportunities for people to prosper and excel."

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IndyCar's Wilson promoting dyslexia awareness

IndyCar's Wilson promoting dyslexia awareness | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Justin Wilson still remembers a time when his classmates considered it laughable that he might one day grow up to become a professional race car driver.

The IndyCar Series driver had a tough time growing up in Sheffield, England, struggling to read lessons or do the writing it took to complete his school work. Only later, around age 14, would he be diagnosed with dyslexia.

"I really struggled at school," Wilson said. "I remember one day, the teacher asking what you want to be when you grow up. And everyone went down and did their thing and it got to me: ‘I want to race cars.’ And everyone laughed. What’s wrong with you guys? And then some joker stood up, ‘Oh, you’ll never race cars. You’re too stupid."’

Today, Wilson has seven career IndyCar victories, including the June 9 race at Texas Motor Speedway. His success has come despite his continued struggles with dyslexia, a reading disability that occurs when the brain does not properly recognize and process certain symbols.

When Wilson looks at a word on a page, he generally can recognize the letters at the beginning of the word and the letters at the end of it — but not the letters in the middle.

"So I still get sentences wrong. I still spell wrong. I still read things the wrong way," Wilson said.

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Braingenie: comprehensive math and science practice site

Braingenie:  comprehensive math and science practice site | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Braingenie is the Web's most comprehensive math and science practice site. Popular among educators and families, Braingenie provides practice and video lessons in more than 4,000 skills.


Via Smaragda Papadopoulou
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For businessman Anders Hedlund School years were the unhappiest; says man who now employs 3,000 people

For businessman Anders Hedlund School years were the unhappiest; says man who now employs 3,000 people | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

MILLIONAIRE businessman Anders Hedlund employs more than 3,000 staff and is well established as one of Wales’ leading entrepreneurs.

But success has been hard earned and Swedish-born Mr Hedlund has had to overcome one obstacle in particular.

“My school years were the unhappiest of my life,” he said.

“I couldn’t read or spell and I was called lazy and stupid by my teachers. If you don’t understand or if people are telling you that you’re stupid, then that’s what you think,” Mr Hedlund said.

Like his father and son, Mr Hedlund is dyslexic – but the condition went unnoticed.

 

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Author, Tressa Messenger, defeats Dyslexia and Writes a Trilogy

Author, Tressa Messenger, defeats Dyslexia and Writes a Trilogy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

We learned that Tressa Messenger struggled through school with dyslexia, a prominent and commonly undiagnosed learning disability. Tressa is one of over two million students struggling with dyslexia – reported by the NY Times.

She grew up with the insecurity of thinking she was inadequate, leading to low self esteem and depression. Like other students suffering with dyslexia, she dropped out of school at a young age.

Years later, Tressa was diagnosed with dyslexia. Instead of giving up on her dreams, she was determined to succeed! She earned her GED, graduated from college while working full-time and raising her daughter, Brennan, as a single parent.

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Toolbox: e5 iPad Apps categorized and aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy

Toolbox: e5 iPad Apps categorized and aligned with Bloom's Taxonomy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Notice that several apps that are in the same app category (ex. screencasting: ShowMe, ScreenChomp and ExplainEverything) are represented on different levels of the Bloom’s. The explanation is that each one of the apps can be used for the different levels. It is not to say that the ShowMe app could not be used on the “Analyzing” level. Also, be aware that simply by using one of the above mentioned app DOES NOT mean that you are working on the specified thinking level. Ex. you could ask your students to use the ScreenChomp app to simply list and record themselves “remembering” facts that they previously had memorized.

Take a look at the iPad apps on YOUR iPad and to categorize these apps with the different thinking levels and THEN take the next step to SHARE your list with other educators. 


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Dyslexics in time machines and alternate realities: thought experiments on the existence of dyslexics, ‘dyslexia’ and ‘Lexism’ - Collinson - 2012 - British Journal of Special Education - Wiley Onli...

Dyslexics in time machines and alternate realities: thought experiments on the existence of dyslexics, ‘dyslexia’ and ‘Lexism’ - Collinson - 2012 - British Journal of Special Education - Wiley Onli... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

RT @SpcialNdsJungle: Dyslexics in time machines and alternate realities: thought experiments on the existence of ‘dyslexia’ and ‘Lexism’ http://t.co/89b6vDwF...
This article explores the possibility that ‘dyslexics’ can be thought of as being ‘othered’ and defined by the social norms and educational practices surrounding literacy; which can be termed ‘Lexism’. As such the author, Craig Collinson, a postgraduate academic support officer at Edge Hill University, presents ‘Lexism’ as a new concept that allows us to reconsider how dyslexics can be said to exist. In a persuasive and original article, Craig argues that dyslexics can be defined by the existence of Lexism rather than the more problematic concept of ‘dyslexia’. He seeks to achieve these ends through a series of thought experiments which suggest a different way of looking at what defines someone as dyslexic in order to suggest that when we talk of the inclusion or exclusion of dyslexic pupils we should be aware of the influence Lexism may have upon us.

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Happy Days' Henry Winkler as The Fonz: tells kids it's cool to read

Happy Days' Henry Winkler as The Fonz:  tells kids it's cool to read | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Fonz made sure schoolkids had a happy day when he dropped in for a book-reading session. Hollywood actor Henry Winkler talked to children from North Chadderton school in Oldham and Bridgewater School in Worsley, Salford, as part of the My Way! tour promoting awareness of dyslexia. The former Happy Days star is due to visit more than 100 schools across the country to help inspire children who struggle in the classroom. The father-of-three found out he was dyslexic aged 31 when he struggled to read scripts after taking on the role of cool leather-clad ‘greaser’ Arthur Fonzarelli in the 1970s American sitcom. He was awarded an honorary OBE last year for his work with children with special educational needs.

Read more at: http://menmedia.co.uk/manchestereveningnews/news/s/1581376_happy-days-as-the-fonz-tells-kids-its-cool-to-read

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