Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Steven Spielberg on unlocking 'tremendous mystery' of his dyslexia

Steven Spielberg on unlocking 'tremendous mystery' of his dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Movies helped Steven Spielberg cope with his dyslexia, the director of "Jaws" and "Schindler's List" said in a rare interview about being diagnosed with the learning disability five years ago.

"It was like the last puzzle part in a tremendous mystery that I've kept to myself all these years," Spielberg, 65, told the website "Friends of Quinn."

As a child, Spielberg said he learned to read two years later than his classmates, which made him subject to teasing and caused him to dread school.

PHOTOS: Celebrities by the Times

That bullying made its way into Spielberg's work as a filmmaker -- the story for the 1985 movie "The Goonies," which Spielberg executive produced, was inspired by Spielberg's own friendships with a group of fellow outcasts, he said.

"I was a member of the goon squad," Spielberg said.

Spielberg also discussed going back to college in his 50s to complete the bachelor's degree he abandoned in 1968 to pursue filmmaking, and confessed that he takes more than twice as long as most of his peers in Hollywood to read books and scripts.

Spielberg gave the interview to Quinn Bradlee, author of the memoir "A Different Life: Growing Up Learning Disabled and Other Adventures" and proprietor of the online community for people with learning disabilities, "Friends of Quinn."

"I never felt like a victim," Spielberg said. "Movies really helped me... kind of saved me from shame, from guilt... Making movies was my great escape."

Spielberg's next film the historical drama "Lincoln," arrives in theaters Nov. 9.

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Carson Everett's curator insight, March 18, 2015 10:07 PM

This article is about Steven Spielberg’s struggle with dyslexia. I have watched a lot of his movies but I never knew that he had a disability. I think it is especially interesting because he is a prominent figure in the entertainment industry. Spielberg has to read many different movie scripts, and the fact that he has successfully coped with his disability is a really good example for others with disabilities. In the article, Spielberg explains the difficulties he faced during his childhood. He was teased and bullied for being behind a level in reading. I wish that more people in Hollywood would be open to sharing their disability. It makes actors and actresses seem more human and relatable. I also think that actors and actresses can be very influential in how people evaluate people with disabilities. If more celebrities accept disabilities, I think that more people would be accepting. 

Julia Wilkins's comment, March 19, 2015 1:06 AM
How interesting! I never knew Steven Spielberg had dyslexia. That really should give students a lot of hope for being able to pursue their passion!
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University of Southern Mississippi to offer dyslexia therapy master's - The Sacramento Bee

University of Southern Mississippi to offer dyslexia therapy master's - The Sacramento Bee | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

HATTIESBURG, Miss. -- The University of Southern Mississippi plans to offer a master's degree in dyslexia therapy starting next June.

Officials say it will teach using sound, sight, touch and movement to help children learn to read. Other features include speaking slowly to give children more time to understand and to watch the speaker's lip movements.

Students also will take courses in typical language development, the structure of the language, reading development, research and related areas.

Officials say it will be the first such program at a public university in Mississippi. It says the Dubard School for Language Disorders and the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education have been working on it for more than three years.

Mississippi College, a private school, offers a master's in dyslexia therapy.

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NJ school district teams with local university to train teachers in OG- NorthJersey.com

NJ school district  teams with local university to train teachers  in OG- NorthJersey.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The school district has teamed up with an area university to train teachers in specialized reading instruction.

Superintendent of Schools James McLaughlin announced last week that the district has established a new initiative to have teachers trained and certificated by Fairleigh Dickinson University (FDU) in the Orton-Gillingham method of reading education.

The 80-year-old approach, named after its developers, generally employs one-on-one instruction to help students with dyslexia or other disabilities use all their senses to recognize the elements that frame the structure of language – elements that mainstream students generally learn subconsciously through repetition and experience.

"[The approach] has been very successful in teaching students who don't...respond to typical reading teaching techniques," McLaughlin said during the school board's Sept. 18 meeting. "It is a multi-sensory, phonetics-based method of reading that – really in a discrete way – teaches children the rules of language in a way that probably none of us read, because we picked up on them or absorbed them in a much more natural type of way."

FDU has gained notoriety in recent years for its nationally accredited Orton-Gillingham Dyslexia Specialist training program and Project Read series of teacher training courses. Its school of education offers teachers 12- to 42-credit courses of instruction in the theory and practice of education tactics and intervention strategies associated with the Orton-Gillingham approach.

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The Inclusive Class: A List of Apps that can Facilitate Inclusion

The Inclusive Class: A List of Apps that can Facilitate Inclusion | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Last week on The Inclusive Class Podcast, guest Kathleen McClaskey, shared a number of Apps that can "level the playing field". In other words, these Apps can be used to help students with special needs and/or learning difficulties participate in classroom reading, writing and math activities. "


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Erin Schettler's curator insight, August 14, 2014 6:39 AM

Just the tip of the iceberg....

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9 Ways Universities Are Using The iPad In & Out Of The Classroom

9 Ways Universities Are Using The iPad In & Out Of The Classroom | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...iPads are making waves in education all over the nation, even in college classrooms, where they’re replacing laptops, textbooks, and notebooks. Some colleges have even gone so far as to hand out iPads to new students, helping students and faculty all work with the same technology for learning.

This year, the iPad is still going strong and schools are continuing to innovate new ways to use the tablets in class and around campus. Here we share just a few of the coolest ways iPads are making waves in higher ed this year, from helping teams play better to ensuring students never forget their notes..."

 


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The Writing Revolution:challenges assumptions about failing students; gets results.

The Writing Revolution:challenges assumptions about failing students; gets results. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"......the school’s principal, Deirdre DeAngelis, began a detailed investigation into why, ultimately, New Dorp’s students were failing. By 2008, she and her faculty had come to a singular answer: bad writing. Students’ inability to translate thoughts into coherent, well-argued sentences, paragraphs, and essays was severely impeding intellectual growth in many subjects. Consistently, one of the largest differences between failing and successful students was that only the latter could express their thoughts on the page. If nothing else, DeAngelis and her teachers decided, beginning in the fall of 2009, New Dorp students would learn to write well. “When they told me about the writing program,” Monica says, “well, I was skeptical.” With disarming candor, sharp-edged humor, and a shy smile, Monica occupies the middle ground between child and adult—she can be both naive and knowing. “On the other hand, it wasn’t like I had a choice. I go to high school. I figured I’d give it a try.”

New Dorp’s Writing Revolution, which placed an intense focus, across nearly every academic subject, on teaching the skills that underlie good analytical writing, was a dramatic departure from what most American students—especially low performers—are taught in high school. The program challenged long-held assumptions about the students and bitterly divided the staff. It also yielded extraordinary results. By the time they were sophomores, the students who had begun receiving the writing instruction as freshmen were already scoring higher on exams than any previous New Dorp class. Pass rates for the English Regents, for example, bounced from 67 percent in June 2009 to 89 percent in 2011; for the global-­history exam, pass rates rose from 64 to 75 percent. The school reduced its Regents-repeater classes—cram courses designed to help struggling students collect a graduation requirement—from five classes of 35 students to two classes of 20 students......"

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Sarah-Jayne Blakemore: The mysterious workings of the adolescent brain | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Why do teenagers seem so much more impulsive, so much less self-aware than grown-ups?
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Roots of Dyslexia: Harvard Med School, Western Galilee College, McGill and Northeastern University

Roots of Dyslexia: Harvard Med School, Western Galilee College, McGill and Northeastern University | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Five percent. That’s the number of people who suffer from dyslexia worldwide, according to researchers at the College of Science at Northeastern University. Even with the number of people who suffer from the disorder, there still isn’t a clear reason as to what causes the disorder.

With this in mind, a collaborative study was completed by researchers from Harvard Medical School, Western Galilee College, McGill University and Northeastern University College of Science, which highlighted how dyslexia may be the result of impairment of a different linguistic system than previously understood.

To begin, dyslexia is considered a reading disorder and can influence how people respond to spoken language. Problems related to dyslexia can be seen early on, even before reading skills are acquired by infants. The findings were recently featured in the open access journal PLoS ONE.

“Our research demonstrates that a closer analysis of the language system can radically alter our understanding of the disorder, and ultimately, its treatment,” commented Iris Berent, a researcher from Northeastern University, in a prepared statement.

The researchers explained how speech perception is thought to be a part of two different linguistic systems. One system is based off phonetics, allowing the individual to extract discrete sound units from an acoustic input. The other, a phonological system, joins the units together to create individual words. Based on past studies, researchers believed that dyslexia was due to a phonological impairment. However, the results from the new study show that the phonetic system may be the cause of dyslexia.

redOrbit (http://s.tt/1nZwT)

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San Diego branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) to hold motivational youth symposium

San Diego branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) to hold motivational youth symposium | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The San Diego branch of the International Dyslexia Association (IDA) will host an ‘Empower Youth’ symposium for children, ages 10-18, and their parents, 9 a.m. to noon, Oct. 6 at the David and Dorothea Garfield Theater, 4126 Executive Drive in La Jolla.
The goal of the event is to empower and inspire pre-teen and teen students with learning differences such as dyslexia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), auditory processing disorder and non-verbal learning disabilities, who struggle to succeed academically and emotionally.
As much as 20 percent of the population has some form of a learning disability, which can cause a person to have trouble learning and using certain skills, according to the IDA. This can affect a person’s self-image, leaving students feeling less capable than they actually are.
The symposium is designed to help build the students’ confidence and self-esteem, featuring motivational speakers who share some of the same challenges.

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ChangeMaker: Have a Learning Difference? This Principal Understands

ChangeMaker: Have a Learning Difference? This Principal Understands | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Brent Kreuger was written off as "lazy" and "stupid" in elementary school in the 1960s -- a time before the "distracted student" was a mainstream social problem. It was years before he was officially diagnosed with dyslexia and borderline ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder).

A generation passed. His kids started to struggle in school. So Krueger set out create a learning environment where outside-the-box thinkers were labelled "entrepreneurial" instead of "learning disabled." It took him eight years and three degrees (two in education), but he did it. Instead of getting troubled students to fit in at school, he built a school to fit them, where there are no learning disabilities, only teaching opportunities.

Kreuger founded in 2007 the Praxis International Institute, the alternative high school he now runs as principal. The school is like summer camp meets business education -- an eco-friendly building in rural Saskatchewan where students study entrepreneurship, technology, global citizenry and environmental sustainability. Students learn that distraction is part of the creative process, and that frustration while learning makes you inquisitive, even analytical.

Given his personal struggle, you'd think Krueger would buck the system. Surprisingly, he's working within it.
Brent Kreuger is a ChangeMaker.

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10 Excellent Free Social Studies Resources for Teachers and Students

10 Excellent Free Social Studies Resources for Teachers and Students | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Over the last couple of weeks, Educational Technology and Mobile Learning has been working diligently to compile lists of free resources and websites pertaining to different subject matter. We know it is the start of a new school year and teachers would be looking for new web resources on the subjects they teach.

As for today, we are going to cover Social Studies resources. Check out the resources below

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TY! @DrCraigWright for: Do Coloured overlays and tinted lenses work as a treatment for dyslexia?

TY! @DrCraigWright  for: Do Coloured overlays and tinted  lenses work as a treatment for dyslexia? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...When reading real text (YARC), there was an effect for Group on passage reading time. Unsurprisingly, the dyslexic group was slower than controls in both Overlay and No Overlay conditions. But there was no effect for Overlay (the overlay made no difference to reading rate for either group) or a Group by Overlay interaction (there was no relative advantage for the dyslexic group in the Overlay condition v No Overlay). Reading comprehension scores did not change in either group as a result of using an overlay. These data are consistent with those reported by Ritchie, Della Sala and McIntosh (2011) in children. They suggest that coloured overlays are not as effective as claimed for improving reading accuracy or fluency...."

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Young lawyer overcomes dyslexia to be shortlisted for national award - Times Series

Young lawyer overcomes dyslexia to be shortlisted for national award - Times Series | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I was always told that I wasn’t bright enough to be a lawyer. I have struggled at every stage.

“I got rejection letter after rejection letter for training contracts but then I was finally diagnosed with dyslexia.

“It was a great breakthrough to discover that I am dyslexic – it explained why I have struggled.”

Miss Omolarami was nominated for the award by her supervisor at work.

She was then shortlisted by a panel of judges at the Law Society who were impressed by the pro bono work she has done.

The young lawyer set up a free legal advice session for families in High Barnet which she runs every Monday afternoon at Underhill School in Mays Lane.

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Pediatric Therapy: Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and Twice Exceptional Children

Pediatric Therapy: Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and Twice Exceptional Children | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....Gifted and twice exceptional children (defined as gifted with a disability) present with a unique set of social and emotional needs that requires adaptation in therapeutic approaches and therapist knowledge of issues specific to the gifted population.

Giftedness is typically defined by advanced intellectual functioning and most often identified by standardized IQ testing. Recently the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) revised its definition of giftedness by referring to advanced levels of aptitude or competence in the top 10% or rarer. Children who are identified as gifted are noted to have high potential for talent development in one or more domain such as mathematics, language, athletics, music or art. While definitions of giftedness may vary, most professional recognize that gifted children often possess a cluster of characteristics that may include:

Emotional sensitivity and intensity
Moral intensity
High degree of compassion
Highly imaginative and creative
Perfectionism
Tendency to question authority
Overly concerned with justice, fairness
Perseverant and highly focused on specific areas of interest
High levels of energy or activity
Preference for older companions, adult interaction
Heightened awareness, keen observation skills
Strong curiosity, desire for knowledge....."

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The International Dyslexia Association Promoting literacy through research, education and advocacy

The International Dyslexia Association Promoting literacy through research, education and advocacy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

How fitting that the International Dyslexia Association’s first “conference tweet chat” is taking place at one of our most forward-thinking sessions, “Neuroscience in the 21st Century: Where are we going?.” This symposium, chaired and organized by Dr. Gordon Sherman, convenes October 24 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) at our 63rd annual conference in Baltimore, MD.

Here is the plan:

During the symposium (and before), we will monitor (but not project) a Twitter feed, from which we will pull questions for our distinguished panel of speakers—Drs. Gordon Sherman, Jeffrey Gilger, John Gabrielli, Albert Galaburda, Brock and Fernette Eide, and Guinevere Eden.

This is a unique opportunity to pose questions to our speakers and to discuss (via Twitter) topics and issues addressed in the symposium. Normally, this kind of engagement is not possible in a session so tightly scheduled. Indeed, it is unlikely that our speakers will have much time to take questions directly from the audience during the symposium.

So, bring your smart phone or laptop to this important session to follow and join the conversation and to tweet your questions (in 140 characters or less) at this hashtag: HASHTAG: #IDA21CNeuro. (When you click on this link, it will take you to a Twitter search page. Copy/paste the hashtag into either search box to get directly to the hashtag feed. Still having trouble getting to the hashtag feed? Pop a tweet to @cdcowen, she'll tweet you the link!)

In fact, you can jump on that hashtag now. Carolyn D. Cowen and Earl Oremus—the symposium’s education responders—already are monitoring the hashtag. (Carolyn and Earl are charged with crafting questions focusing on the symposium’s educational implications.)

Neuroscience meets Twitter at International Dyslexia Association conference http://www.interdys.org/NeuroscienceMeetsTwitter.htm #...


Via Carolyn D Cowen
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Thank you @brainpicker for Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing

Thank you @brainpicker for Zadie Smith’s 10 Rules of Writing | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Maria Popova writes; " In the winter of 2010, inspired by Elmore Leonard’s 10 rules of writing published in The New York Times nearly a decade earlier, The Guardian reached out to some of today’s most celebrated authors and asked them to each offer his or her 10 rules.

 

My favorite is Zadie Smith’s list — an exquisite balance of the practical, the philosophical, and the poetic:"

 

When still a child, make sure you read a lot of books.

 

Spend more time doing this than anything else.


When an adult, try to read your own work as a stranger would read it, or even better, as an enemy would.


Don’t romanticise your ‘vocation’. You can either write good sentences or you can’t. There is no ‘writer’s lifestyle’. All that matters is what you leave on the page.


Avoid your weaknesses. But do this without telling yourself that the things you can’t do aren’t worth doing. Don’t mask self-doubt with contempt.


Leave a decent space of time between writing something and editing it.


Avoid cliques, gangs, groups. The presence of a crowd won’t make your writing any better than it is.


Work on a computer that is disconnected from the internet.
Protect the time and space in which you write. Keep everybody away from it, even the people who are most important to you.


Don’t confuse honours with achievement. 


Tell the truth through whichever veil comes to hand — but tell it.

 

Resign yourself to the lifelong sadness that comes from never ­being satisfied.

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5 Teleprompter Apps for iPad

5 Teleprompter Apps for iPad | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...Some people love making fun of teleprompters and those who use them. But these tools can be quite helpful in improving your public speaking skills. They are handy for giving great speeches too. Teleprompters could be a bit costly. Thanks to these iPad apps, you can use your iPad as your teleprompter:"


Via John Evans
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Boys and Girls Learn Differently - SchoolFamily.com

Boys and Girls Learn Differently - SchoolFamily.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...Research supports what parents of boys and girls have always known: Those brains are wired differently.

Not all kids fit the pattern, but boys tend to learn better when they have pictures, graphics, and physical movement to help them grasp concepts. Girls often benefit from the opportunity to talk about how to solve a problem and work with others on a solution.

“We are understanding more and more how the brain learns, and how boys’ and girls’ brains learn differently,” says Michael Gurian, author of Boys and Girls Learn Differently: A Guide for Teachers and Parents. “It’s a big deal.”

Understanding these differences can help parents decide when to let a child learn in his comfort zone and when to push him to try something that doesn’t come naturally. It can help parents recognize behavior that is typical and problems that might be fixed by tweaking the learning environment.

Girls tend to mature a little faster than boys, developing language skills sooner and giving them the edge over boys in reading, writing, and speech.

While boys are lagging behind girls on writing assignments, they are often ahead in math and science. They may like to build things, manipulate objects, and picture complex objects in their minds. This explains why boys are drawn to construction toys like Legos, complex building puzzles, and even video games.

Parents of boys may feel like the classroom is set up to favor girls, who can sit still and listen to the teacher for longer periods of time. Parents of girls may worry that their daughters are praised for being good at reading and writing and not pushed to excel in math and science. And for parents who have at least one boy and one girl, the adventure is in figuring out how to help both succeed in school.

One common difference between boys and girls is how they behave after school, Gurian says. All children tend to need to wind down after a hectic day at school. But they have different ways of chilling out. Girls generally like to talk. And talk and talk and talk. “Boys more often resist talking after school,” Gurian says, noting that boys can be quick to plug into a music device and zone out...."

Learning differences between boys and girl: http://t.co/3pssZYY8 #education #parenting...

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Guide Highlights Effective Social-Emotional Programs for PreK, Beyond

Guide Highlights Effective Social-Emotional Programs for PreK, Beyond | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new review of social and emotional learning programs for schools looked at dozens of programs for pre-K and elementary students, highlighting 23 that promote students' self-control, relationship building, and problem solving, among other skills.

The review, by the Chicago-based Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, rated programs based on whether they provide opportunities for students to practice their social and emotional skills, the contexts in which those skills are promoted and reinforced, and whether there is evidence of the programs' effectiveness. However the report notes that the outcomes of each program—which have been studied by researchers—varied. Most demonstrated an effect on students' behavior, with outcomes such as positive social behavior and a reduction in behavior problems, but only some showed an effect on emotional distress and academic performance.

This is the first review of social and emotional learning programs by CASEL in almost 10 years. The update was needed in part because of advances in research and policy since then, the group said. Research links social and emotional skills to improved attitudes about school, behavior that benefits others, and academic achievement, and a reduction in aggression, mental health problems, and drug and alcohol use. (The project was supported by the NoVo Foundation, which also supports Education Week's coverage of school climate and student behavior and engagement.)

Recognition that schools should teach social and emotional skills has grown in recent years and some members of Congress even introduced a bill last year that would allow federal Title II grants, generally used for class-size reduction and teacher professional development, to be used to support elementary and secondary social and emotional learning programs, too.

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Mississippi Dyslexia Law: all students screened for dyslexia in K-1st grade.

Mississippi Dyslexia Law: all students screened for dyslexia in K-1st grade. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The School of Education at William Carey University, in partnership with the Mississippi Dyslexia Therapy Association, presented a Dyslexia Institute on September 6 on the Hattiesburg campus. The sessions included “Screening Students in Kindergarten and 1st Grade for Dyslexia” and “Dyslexia for Diagnosticians.” The Dyslexia Institute sessions were led by Rep. Larry Byrd, state representative, District 104; Dr. Cena Holifield, founder and executive director of The Dynamic Dyslexia Design School (The 3-D School) in Petal; Elesha McCarty, speech pathologist with Strategies Therapy Group in Hattiesburg; and Dr. Jane Herrin, an educational consultant licensed psychometrist.

Rep. Byrd authored House Bill 1031 and on May 23, Gov. Phil Bryant signed the Bill into law. One of the groundbreaking components of the Mississippi Dyslexia Law states that after July 1, 2012, all students must be screened for dyslexia in the spring of kindergarten and in the fall of first grade.

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Does having a learning difference like dyslexia make you more likely to be an entrepreneur?

Does having a learning difference like dyslexia make you more likely to be an entrepreneur? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said that they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers.

 

The Economist in it’s latest edition suggests that business needs people with Asperger’s syndrome, attention-deficit disorder and dyslexia:

Julie Login of Cass Business School surveyed a group of entrepreneurs and found that 35% of them said that they suffered from dyslexia, compared with 10% of the population as a whole and 1% of professional managers. Prominent dyslexics include the founders of Ford, General Electric, IBM and IKEA, not to mention more recent successes such as Charles Schwab (the founder of a stockbroker), Richard Branson (the Virgin Group), John Chambers (Cisco) and Steve Jobs (Apple).

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Student Blog-Commander Ben advises: If You Have Dyslexia, Make The iPad or the iPhone Speak

Student Blog-Commander Ben advises: If You Have Dyslexia, Make The iPad or the iPhone Speak | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....Many thanks to my fantastic readers for the outpouring of support about my dyslexia posts! Over the last few days, I’ve received some emails with technology questions 

Today, I want to share a short tutorial about how to make the iPad or the iPhone “speak”. This function is called “Speak Selection” and is a great text reader function for anyone who has dyslexia.

“Speak Selection” can be easily accessed by clicking on the “Settings” App icon....."

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Download free guide: 50 of the best, no-filler-added websites and apps for teachers.

Download free guide: 50 of the best, no-filler-added websites and apps for teachers. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
If you are like most educators, you’re on an incessant prowl for new ways to engage your students. As someone who doesn’t have a lot of time—and is determined to make good use of what time you do have—it is likely that you’re also looking for ways to streamline your curriculum and stay organized.

You may be a “tech-head” already, but you don’t have to be to make any of these 50 user-friendly websites and apps a part of your everyday life.

If you do a quick Google search for “Top Apps for Teachers," you’ll find plenty of compilations out there. Too often, though, these “greatest hits” err on the side of quantity over quality. As a result, you end up wading through a laundry list of clunkers and dead links.

Instead of striving for quantity, we’ve boiled down our favorites list to what we consider to be the best, no-filler-added websites and apps for teachers out there.

Our descriptions of each resource are brief and lighthearted—and hopefully,
substantive enough to give you a sense for whether or not they will fit your students’
and your needs.

We've broken down our compilation like this:

Apps for the Unorganized
Keeping Connected (Social Networking)
Apps for Enhancing Your Curriculum
Media & Miscellaneous


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, John Evans
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50 iPad Apps For Struggling Readers & Writers

50 iPad Apps For Struggling Readers & Writers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Whether you’re the parent of a child with a reading disability or an educator that works with learning disabled students on a daily basis, you’re undoubtedly always looking for new tools to help these bright young kids meet their potential and work through their disability. While there are numerous technologies out there that can help, perhaps one of the richest is the iPad, which offers dozens of applications designed to meet the needs of learning disabled kids and beginning readers alike. Here, we highlight just a few of the amazing apps out there that can help students with a reading disability improve their skills not only in reading, writing, and spelling, but also get a boost in confidence and learn to see school as a fun, engaging activity, not a struggle.

 

These tools are useful for both educators and students with reading disabilities alike, aiding in everything from looking up a correct spelling to reading text out loud.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Steven Blomdale's curator insight, March 6, 2013 7:35 PM

 In schools across Australia there is strong support for linking learning in Technologies with learning literacy skills. Learning in Technologies places a high priority on accurate and unambiguous communication (ACARA, 2013).Implementing digital technologies in learning areas such as English allows special education teachers to facilitate and accommodate the learning needs of students. This is achieved through integrating assistive devices such as the iPad and its applications to develop critical literacy skills needed in the 21st century.  Consequently special education teacher have a better opportunity to develop important General capabilities such as literacy (LIT) to allows student to become literate as they develop the knowledge, skills and dispositions to interpret and use language confidently for learning and communicating in and out of school and for participating effectively in society (ACARA, 2013).

 

 

This website suggests various applications that can be used on the ipad to assist special needs students. The list of  applications were selected to improve and develop students reading, writing and spelling. They engage the students through making the activities, fun and engaging, which I think is important when teaching special needs students.

Patricia Christian's curator insight, March 22, 2014 8:53 PM

You can never have enough resources to pull from when working with mainstream or challenged students. 

Deb's curator insight, March 4, 2016 5:47 PM
Lots of options to help struggling learners...
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Study unveils clue to the origin of dyslexia | Science Codex

Study unveils clue to the origin of dyslexia | Science Codex | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Because dyslexia affects so many people around the world, countless studies have attempted to pinpoint the source of the learning disorder. Even though dyslexia is defined as a reading disorder, it also affects how a person perceives spoken language.

THE STUDY

Speech perception engages at least two linguistic systems: The phonetic system, which extracts discrete sound units from the acoustic input, and the phonological system, which combines these units to form individual words.

Prior to Prof. Berent's study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers thought patients with dyslexia displayed an impairment in the phonological system. But through a series of experiments, Prof. Berent was able to show that it is the phonetic, not the phonological system, that might be the culprit.

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