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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Audiobooks Help Kids Learn - North American Press Syndicate

Audiobooks Help Kids Learn - North American Press Syndicate | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Audiobooks Help Kids LearnNorth American Press Syndicate(NAPSI)—With school back in session, there is good news for millions of students who have difficulty reading because of dyslexia or other learning disabilities.

Studies have shown that audiobooks are remarkably effective for many students with reading-based disabilities. The benefits of auditory learning include increased comprehension, better grades, higher confidence and improved self-esteem. The leading resource for these students is Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization that offers the world’s most advanced library of audio textbooks for at-home and in-the-classroom reading.

 

Learning Ally offers instant access to more than 75,000 audio textbooks and popular literature titles—nearly everything required for kindergarten through high school and beyond. The audiobooks can be easily loaded to devices that kids use in everyday life—like iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, as well as their laptops.

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The 'Get it Done' Personality: Academic Workplace 2012 - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The 'Get it Done' Personality: Academic Workplace 2012 - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Successful Academic
People who get things done and accomplish their goals often share these traits:

Resilience
The ability to recover from setbacks and cope effectively with stress

Grit
Perseverance and passion for challenging long-term goals

Conscientiousness
A tendency to be orderly, self-controlled, industrious, responsible, and willing to delay gratification

Creativity
The willingness to break with convention, challenge the status quo, and come up with new ideas

Focus
The ability to zero in on one thing at a time, tune out distractions, and avoid multitasking

Self regulation
An awareness of what matters and the discipline to avoid temptations and see a task through

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Enrollment at all-time high this year at Marburn Academy, For students with LD, Columbus, OH:

Enrollment at all-time high this year at Marburn Academy, For students with LD, Columbus, OH: | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"When classes resume on Aug. 22 at Marburn Academy, the Northland private school for young people with ADHD and other learning differences will have more than 170 students. "The most we've ever had," spokeswoman Nancy Paul said last week. This marks Marburn Academy's 31st year of operation. It is now located in a former elementary school building at 1860 Walden Drive. The growth is most apparent at Marburn Academy High School, where two modular classrooms and a commons area have been added from last year, school officials announced. Grades nine through 12 will start the academic year with close to 50 students, according to head of high school Mindy Bixel. "We've just steadily added students over the years," Bixel said, noting the high school had 18 students when she started as a teacher at Marburn nine years ago. Bixel has been head of high school for four years. "I think the word is out," she said. "I think our reputation is solid. The community now knows and trusts that we are actually the school we say we are. Academy officials frequently point out that, in spite of their learning difficulties, 100 percent of Marburn graduates are accepted into college. This comes at a steep price: slightly under $20,000 annually for lower and middle division students and closer to $21,000 at the high school level, by some accounts. However, Paul pointed out that many students attend on scholarships, including a new one this year called the Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program, named for former state Rep. Jon Peterson, a special needs advocate. The program allows students who have an individualized education plan, "which means they qualify for special education services from their home school," to transfer that funding to another school, according to Paul. "For example, a student diagnosed with ADHD or dyslexia receives extra funding from the state because they qualify for special education," Paul wrote in an email. "Now that extra funding would follow the student to a school like Marburn for help paying for tuition."

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Shameful Treatment of Children in Meridian, Miss.

Shameful Treatment of Children in Meridian, Miss. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In recent years, juvenile justice advocates, lawyers, policy-makers, and reformers have increasingly sought to raise awareness of the American phenomenon of the “school-to-prison pipeline.”

The term refers generally to the process in which substandard public schools fail to provide adequate support and resources for at-risk children and their families, resulting in high drop-out rates and ultimately leading to court-involvement, detention and incarceration.

More specifically, the term refers to the pattern in which students who have committed school-based wrongdoing — whether by pushing another child in the hallway, taking a pencil from a teacher’s desk, or disrupting class — are summarily arrested, charged with violating a criminal offense, and prosecuted in juvenile delinquency court. After a judge finds them delinquent, youth are then placed on probation and court-ordered to comply with a long series of conditions, typically including that they not be suspended (or not be suspended again) from school. In many jurisdictions when a juvenile on probation is suspended — even for a minor infraction at school — the consequences of the violation may include incarceration in a detention center.

Research has shown that youth who are disproportionately impacted by the school-to-prison pipeline are likely to be those who are already the most vulnerable: low-income students, children of color, English language learners, youth in foster care, students with disabilities (whether physical, psychological, or developmental), and homeless children. Often such students fall into more than one of these categories.

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Thank you for Several Short Sentences About Writing

Thank you  for Several Short Sentences About Writing | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
You can say smart, interesting, complicated things using short sentences.
How long is a good idea?
Does it become less good if it’s expressed in two sentences instead of one?

[…]

There’s nothing wrong with well-made, strongly constructed, purposeful long sentences.
But long sentences often tend to collapse or break down or become opaque or trip over their awkwardness.
They’re pasted together with false syntax.
And rely on words like ‘with’ and ‘as’ to lengthen the sentence.
They’re short on verbs, weak in syntactic vigor,
Full of floating, unattached phrases, often out of position.
And worse — the end of the sentence commonly forgets its beginning,
As if the sentence were a long, weary road to the wrong place.

[…]

Writing short sentences will help you write strong, balanced sentences of any length.
Strong, lengthy sentences are really just strong, short sentences joined in various ways.

 

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Princeton grad wins battle with dyslexia

Princeton grad wins battle with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

On the surface, James Wallace has lived a charmed life. He achieved a 3.92 grade-point average to rank 14th in Princeton Community High School’s Class of 2008, and a 3.73 grade-point average in earning a geology degree in May at the University of Southern Indiana. Come Aug. 20 he’ll begin pursuit of a structural geology degree at Indiana University, where he took a geology class last summer and made such an impression that he was hired to teach this summer’s class that studied rocks in southwest Montana.
No impediments, right?
Wrong!
The 22-year-old son of Jimmy and Lisa Wallace — dad a high school art teacher and mom a Brumfield Elementary School third grade teacher — was diagnosed in fourth grade with dyslexia, a neurological disorder that causes the brain to process information differently. It can hinder reading, writing and spelling, and sometimes speaking.
“I had trouble reading and with reading comprehension,” said James Wallace, the oldest of three siblings, including 2012 Princeton grad and incoming University of Southern Indiana freshman Jack, and Princeton junior Sam.
“Math was easier for me, but I had trouble staying focused. It took two and three times as long to read something. I had to read a page over and over two or three times. Taking notes was always an uphill struggle.
“It was frustrating.”
Jimmy Wallace noted that “you might hear what the teacher is saying and follow the letters on the board. But if you’re two or three paragraphs behind, you get frustrated.”

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Thank you @cecollins for The 6 People You Need in Your Corner - Forbes

Thank you @cecollins  for The 6 People You Need in Your Corner - Forbes | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Nothing incredible is accomplished alone. You need others to help you, and you need to help others. With the right team, you can form a web of connections to make the seemingly impossible practically inevitable.
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2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter: free e-book on homeschooling a child with dyslexia

2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter: free e-book on homeschooling a child with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
RT @GiftedPhoenix: Twice Exceptional Newsletter 26 July 2012: http://t.co/IC6G0x4B #2e #gtvoice...

 

HOMESCHOOLING, DYSLEXIA BOOK. Last Monday, when we posted about a free e-book on the topic of homeschooling a child with dyslexia, we failed to mention that the author, Kerry Jones, has written for 2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter. In July of 2009 we ran Jones' article "Resources to Boost Homeschool Learning for 2e Kids," focusing on how technology can help a homeschooling parent. So good going, Kerry Jones, with your new book.

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IES, WWC study questions effectiveness of the Reading Mastery, (McGraw Hill ) for Students with LD

IES, WWC study questions effectiveness of the  Reading Mastery,  (McGraw Hill )  for Students with LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A new report from the What Works Clearinghouse questions the effectiveness of a longstanding, widely used reading program, developed by McGraw-Hill, for students with learning disabilities. In a report this month, Reading Mastery was found to have no discernible effects on reading comprehension and potentially negative effects on alphabetics, reading fluency, and writing for students with learning disabilities.

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Great List of Resources for helping children with Dyslexia: books, websites and apps--

Great List of Resources for helping children with Dyslexia: books, websites and apps-- | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

According to the NIH, 17% of our nation’s children have trouble learning to read. More than 2.9 million school-age children in the United States – approximately five percent of the student population – are diagnosed with learning disabilities. When we first realized that our otherwise bright oldest child was not learning to read as he should, we began looking for answers. That was 15 years ago. He learned to read, graduated from highschool with honors {not necessarily academic} and has gone on to do amazing things with his life. Our journey to discover what held him back in reading and how to help him had a steep learning curve. Since then, we have 7 more children – 6 who have struggled in some way to learn to read. Click on these links to learn more about our Dyslexia Journey and more about the Causes and Treatments of Dyslexia.

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Early Intervention: Why it's a must for children with reading difficulties or learning differences

Early Intervention: Why it's a must for children with reading difficulties or learning differences | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

If your child doesn’t learn to read, they are more likely to have social problems, develop a poor self-image, and earn less than their peers as adults.

Hearing this shouldn’t come as any great shock. After all, reading is central to daily life for most of us. Even if we don’t consider ourselves big “readers,” we still read bills, ads, emails, websites, and correspondence at work.

But for people who never learned to read, or who can only read a little, everyday life is a constant battle of faking their way through a literate world, hoping they don’t slip up. To combat this problem, a number of adult literacy programs have sprung up, but most research shows that it’s much more difficult – and time-consuming – for adults to become literate. In fact, even high school and middle school programs for slower learners seem to be a case of too little, too late.

Now, that’s not to say that older kids and adults can’t learn – quite the opposite. But the job does get tougher the more time passes and the more we struggle. This kind of failure – without proper help and guidance – makes us withdraw further and try less because we’d rather fake our way through than endure ridicule – real or perceived.

Luckily, the answer is right in front of us, because many students have shown marked improvement – so long as they have that proper help and guidance we mentioned, and provided they get it early enough.

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2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter: check out this issue!

2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter: check out this issue! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This blog is from the publishers of 2e: Twice-Exceptional Newsletter, a bi-monthly electronic publication for those who raise, educate, and counsel high-ability children with learning issues such as AD/HD, dyslexia, Asperger's, ...

In this issue: 

2e PROGRAM IN DC. NAGC pointed us to an article about a one-year-old program at a Washington, D.C., Jewish school. Called "Twice Exceptional" and led by a former staffer at the Montgomery County Public Schools, the program's aim is to "provide the correct accommodations and materials for students who may be misunderstood in the classroom." Read more.
ALSO FROM NAGC. The NAGC publication Gifted Child Quarterly is soliciting empirical or theoretical articles for the fall, 2013, issue, which will deal with twice-exceptionality. The deadline for proposals is September 1, so if you're interested, find out more from the publisher or from NAGC.
GOING TO COLLEGE WITH AD/HD. PsychCentral offers an article called "Colleges Gear Up to Help Students with AD/HD." The article covers some of the roadblocks AD/HD students may face and advice on how to get around those roadblocks. Find the article.
PARENTAL INVOLVEMENT is the topic of an article in The New York Times. From the article: "..the optimal parent is one who is involved and responsive, who sets high expectations but respects her child’s autonomy. These 'authoritative parents' appear to hit the sweet spot of parental involvement and generally raise children who do better academically, psychologically and socially than children whose parents are either permissive and less involved, or controlling and more involved." Read more.

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Infographic: Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Infographic: Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. To read the article associated with this map, see: http://www.pewsocialtrends.org/2012/08/01/the-rise-of-residential-segregation-by-income/


Via Seth Dixon
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The Reading Like a Historian Curriculum | Stanford History Education Group

The Reading Like a Historian Curriculum | Stanford History Education Group | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents modified for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities.

This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip's War to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and make historical claims backed by documentary evidence.

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Once upon a time...‘The Storytelling Animal,’ by Jonathan Gottschall

Once upon a time...‘The Storytelling Animal,’ by Jonathan Gottschall | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Make-believe is more than fun and games, Jonathan Gottschall says; it helps us navigate life’s complex social problems.

 

As the philosopher Karl Popper wrote, simulation of the future allows “our hypotheses to die in our stead.” Clever animals don’t want to engage in the expensive and potentially fatal game of physically testing every action to discover its consequences. That’s what story is good for. The production and scrutiny of counterfactuals (colloquially known as “what ifs”) is an optimal way to test and refine one’s behavior.

But storytelling may run even deeper than that. Remember, in “Star Wars,” when Luke Skywalker precisely aims his proton torpedoes into the vent shaft of the Death Star? Of course you do. It’s memorable because it’s the climax of a grand story about good triumphing over evil.

Gottschall points out that for a story to work, it has to possess a particular morality. To capture and influence, it can’t be plagued with moral repugnance — involving, say, a sexual love story between a mother and her son, or a good guy who becomes crippled and a bad guy who profits handsomely. If the narrative doesn’t contain the suitable kind of virtue, brains don’t absorb it. The story torpedo misses the exposed brain vent. (There are exceptions, Gottschall allows, but they only prove the rule.)

This leads to the suggestion that story’s role is “intensely moralistic.” Stories serve the biological function of encouraging pro-social behavior. Across cultures, stories instruct a version of the following: If we are honest and play by the social rules, we reap the rewards of the protagonist; if we break the rules, we earn the punishment accorded to the bad guy. The theory is that this urge to produce and consume moralistic stories is hard-wired into us, and this helps bind society together. It’s a group-level adaptation. As such, stories are as important as genes. They’re not time wasters; they’re evolutionary innovations.

Gottschall highlights this social-­binding property in the stories nations tell about themselves. Full of inaccuracies, these are “mostly fiction, not history,” he writes. They accomplish the same evolutionary function as religion: defining groups, coordinating behavior and suppressing selfishness in favor of cooperation. Our national myths “tell us that not only are we the good guys,” Gottschall writes, “but we are the smartest, boldest, best guys that ever were.”

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Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and learning differences- The Ohio State University

Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and learning differences- The Ohio State University | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD) will launch a series of nationwide trainings aimed at creating a movement for change in the African American community that results in an improved and socially just quality of education for African American children with learning differences. The inaugural symposium and training, Empowering Parents for African American Student Achievement, August 10-12, In Columbus at the OSU Blackwell Inn and Conference Center is co-sponsored by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity. Institute staff will participate in a public forum on Friday, August 10th, 5:30 to 7:30 at the King Lincoln Theatre and will lecture on implicit racial bias before the symposium’s invited participants. This convening compliments the Kirwan Institute’s ongoing and emerging research on barriers to educational opportunity that confront African Americans and other populations of color.

AACLD press release
See the presentation on implicit bias

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Dyslexia: The First 100 most commonly used words chart

Dyslexia: The First 100 most commonly used words chart | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

High frequency words are quite simply those words which occur most frequently in written material. For example, "and", "the", "as" and "it".

They are often words that have little meaning on their own, but they do contribute a great deal to the meaning of a sentence.

Some of the high frequency words can be sounded out using basic phonic rules, e.g. "it" is an easy word to read using phonics.

However, many of the high frequency words are not phonically regular and are therefore hard to read in the early stages.

These words are sometimes called tricky words, sight words or camera words.

In addition to being difficult to sound out, most of the high frequency words have a rather abstract meaning which is hard to explain to a child.

Below you can download our first 100 and second 100 most commonly used words chart for your classroom as a display or simply to put in front of your child when they are doing their homework to assist them with spelling.

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Fortune Academy Indianapolis school caters to students with dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity

Fortune Academy Indianapolis school caters to students with dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
An Indianapolis school that caters to students with "learning differences" such as dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a new name, new location and a cash donation to help it grow.

Formerly, it was the Hutson School, located in the 7200 block of East 75th Street.

Now it's the Fortune Academy, and it inhabits a bigger, newer building at 5626 Lawton Loop East Drive -- a spot off 56th Street in Lawrence Township.

The move to the 15,693-square-foot facility is made possible by a $500,000 from Richard Fortune and the William L. Fortune Trustees Fund, said Janet George, the school's founder.

"We are excited as we further our mission to help children with learning differences become competent and confident life long learners," George said in a prepared statement.

The financial gift is intended to kick off an effort to raise $5 million for the school.

"The dream that Richard (Fortune) and I share of establishing a school for dyslexic students in Indiana," George said, "comes together on this day."

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For Dyslexic and Visually Impaired Students, a Free High-Tech Solution

For Dyslexic and Visually Impaired Students, a Free High-Tech Solution | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

“I would hear about a book and remember thinking, ‘I wish I could read that,’ knowing it might be available in a year and a half. Bookshare changed all that.”

 

For Elizabeth and the millions of students who are “print disabled” — meaning they have trouble reading because of dyslexia or vision impairment — many textbooks are not available in an audio format or in any other format that’s easily accessible. Bookshare converts texts into accessible digital formats–mostly audio and digital braille–for those who can’t decipher print.

 

It’s not that Benetech invented accessible literature. The National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), which is part of the Library of Congress, has 300,000 titles and close to 1 million registered readers. The library provides audio books, Braille books and digital files that communicate with electronic Braille notetakers. However, many NLS books must be requested by mail and wait lists for popular texts can be long. In the last few years, the NLS has started offering some texts for download.

A few other services, like the nonprofit Learning Ally which has been around since 1948, also offer accessible books for the visually impaired. But the difference is that neither of these organizations specializes in textbooks. In fact, the NLS refers users to Bookshare, for this purpose.

Currently Bookshare, which was founded in 2001, offers more than 150,000 titles, which can be downloaded in a file format that works with several different digital solutions. Membership is free for all students, including those in adult education, and $50 per year for everyone else, not including a $25 one-time set up fee. For textbooks that aren’t yet available on Bookshare, users can send in a request for those titles, which then take anywhere from a couple of weeks to a couple of months to convert.

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He survived knife attacks, fire-eating and even conquered dyslexia. Now Bob Hoskins faces his toughest fight

He survived knife attacks, fire-eating and even conquered dyslexia. Now Bob Hoskins faces his toughest fight | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Bob Hoskins (pictured) announced his retirement from acting following his diagnosis late last year of Parkinson's disease. His life has been a rollercoaster ride that started in the turbulent North London of the fifties.

Hoskins got into acting late, after a range of jobs, including trainee accountant, Covent Garden market porter, steeplejack and sailor. This experience of the real world was to give his performances their bite.
His father was a clerk at Pickfords removals firm. His mother was a school cook. One of his grandmothers was a Romany gypsy. At Stroud Green Secondary Modern, he had been ‘a useless student. I just didn’t work hard. The teachers didn’t like me very much and I didn’t like them’. His dyslexia meant he was often written off as stupid.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2186301/He-survived-knife-attacks-eating-conquered-dyslexia-Now-Bob-Hoskins-faces-toughest-fight.html#ixzz238UAhMvd

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If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and 2e

If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and 2e | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?: Surviving in the Land of the Gifted and Twice Exceptional (Perspectives in Gifted Homeschooling): Jen Merrill, Sarah J. Wilson: Amazon.com: Kindle Store (#5: If This is a Gift, Can I Send it Back?
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College hopes renewed for High School dropouts in Lawrence, MA - Eagle-Tribune

College hopes renewed for High School  dropouts in Lawrence, MA - Eagle-Tribune | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

LAWRENCE — This month’s opening of Phoenix Academy-Lawrence, a new alternative high school, will revive college hopes and careers for hundreds of dropouts in the city.

It will also mean a potential multi-million-dollar savings for the city’s economy in lifetime earnings that would have been lost for students failing to earn their high school diplomas, according to an educator involved in the school’s creation.

“High quality education is a game changer for Lawrence youth and the thing that will change the city,” Beth Anderson told a group of educators last week at a forum titled “The Lawrence Reforms and School Choice.”

“Every dropout in Massachusetts costs about $300,000 in lifetime lost earnings,” noted Anderson, executive director of the Phoenix Charter Academy Network, the Chelsea-based charter school group hired to run the new school.

“These kids can possibly stay in Lawrence, but they’re not going to be able to succeed there. This is a huge economic problem for cities that want to recover and change,” Anderson said.

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New Insights Into the Neuroscience of Dyslexia - Psych Central News

New Insights Into the Neuroscience of Dyslexia  - Psych Central News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Most of us take the ability to read and write for granted. For some, however, these fundamental skills are difficult to master.

Sadly, factors associated with the variety of symptoms that contribute to a diagnosis of dyslexia have remained obscure. New research may change this picture as researchers announce a major advancement toward understanding the cause of dyslexia.

Neuroscientist Begoña Díaz, Ph.D., and her colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany, have discovered an important neural mechanism underlying dyslexia.

They believe problems arise in the part of the brain called the medial geniculate body in the thalamus. Experts believe this discovery can provide the basis for developing potential treatments for the condition.

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African Amer. students suspended 3 x rate of white children| EdSource Today

African Amer. students suspended 3 x rate of white children| EdSource Today | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

African American students are more than three times as likely to be handed out-of-school suspensions as are white children, according to an extensive study released Tuesday by education researchers affiliated with UCLA. Nationwide, one out of six African American students is at risk of suspension every year, compared with one in 14 Hispanic students and one in 20 white students.

“Opportunities Suspended: The Disparate Impact of Disciplinary Exclusion from School” is the latest report to highlight racial and ethnic disparities in student discipline and to call for alternatives to out-of-school suspensions. It includes a database of suspensions by race and ethnicity for districts and states.

“The findings in this study are deeply disturbing,” wrote Gary Orfield, a professor of education and co-director of the Civil Rights Project at UCLA, in a foreword to the report. “Students who are barely maintaining a connection with their school often are pushed out, as if suspension were a treatment.”

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Districts get dyslexia grants focusing on methods for helping children with dyslexia K-5 - Hattiesburg American

Districts get dyslexia grants focusing on methods for helping children with dyslexia K-5  - Hattiesburg American | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
he Lamar County School District will use the $45,000-a-year grant to screen its kindergartners for dyslexia and train K-5 teachers on how to identify and work with dyslexic students.

Petal School District received a $134,965 grant to be used over the three-year period. Also, Jones County School District was awarded a $134,971 grant.

"This means for us that we're hopefully going to do a better job of identifying reading problems in our students and help them do a better job in reading," Lamar County Superintendent Ben Burnett said.

Work under the grant begins when school starts next week.

The district previously gave dyslexia training to 125 kindergarten through third-grade teachers under a grant it received last year from the state Department of Education.

"A recent survey indicated a high percentage of the instructional staff wanted more knowledge on identifying characteristics of dyslexic students or working with students with characteristics of dyslexia," Assistant Superintendent Stacey Pace said in an email.

Burnett said the grant would allow the district to meet its teachers' needs for dealing with dyslexic students.

 

"It is the intent of the district to meet the needs of the dyslexic population, especially in grades K through 5 and to address the needs for reading improvement," she said.

Lamar County School District and Petal School District were among eight public school districts in the state to receive the grant.

"This grant will be implemented in grades K through 5 in each of our elementary schools," said Pace.

Training will take place monthly, and detailed training will occur for about 25 teachers throughout the three-year grant, according to Pace.

Teachers will be trained in the Orton-Gillingham method - a teaching approach that is commonly used with dyslexic students.

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