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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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5 Celebrities with Dyslexia whose stories can Inspire students and give hope to parents!

5 Celebrities with Dyslexia whose stories can Inspire students and give hope to parents! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
5 Celebrities with Dyslexia who will Inspire You (5 Celebrities with Dyslexia who will Inspire You http://t.co/UNKQU9r7...)...

"....If you have kids who are struggling with dyslexia, the greatest gift you can give them is the sense that nothing is unattainable. With dyslexia comes a very great gift, which is the way that your mind can think creatively. If your kids can be given the opportunity to find that way of thinking, what works for them, they will be very happy and successful in whatever field they choose to go into. That I think is what my life has been.” -- Orlando Bloom at the 2010 Adam Katz Memorial Lecture

Whoopi Goldberg – Her learning disability was a mystery to the adults in her life, and Goldberg dealt with feeling “stupid” during school. Like so many children, Goldberg wasn’t diagnosed with dyslexia until well after dropping out of school.
“If you read to me I could tell you everything that was read. They didn’t know what it was. They knew I wasn’t lazy, but what was it?” – Whoopi Goldberg......"

 

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Should WeTeach Mindfulness? Would it help children develop stronger Executive Function Skills?

Should WeTeach Mindfulness? Would it help children develop stronger Executive Function Skills? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".. Mindfulness, the practice of being present and in the moment, is easier for some people than for others. But it is a skill that many believe is worth cultivating—some say, starting with children. Preventing your mind from taking you into the past or future can, after all, be an antidote to depression (which can result from ruminating over previous mistakes, say) and anxiety (about bad things that might happen). Practicing attending to the sights, sounds and other sensations of the moment can, research shows, be calming. It can also train your focus. Both of these effects, it turns out, can have a fundamental impact on brain function.

In particular, mindfulness seems to buttress the brain’s “executive” functions, which are needed to plan and carry out goals. These functions include working memory, where we store data short-term and manipulate it; the ability to shift mental gears and, importantly, self-regulation, which is largely, stopping ourselves from doing stupid things. Many educators now say these basic functions are worth training in schools, because they prepare students to learn and indeed, seem to have a significant impact on academic achievement. They also promote success in other ways.

The ability to pay attention in school and elsewhere, after all, relies on being able to think about the right things, and inhibit thoughts that lead you astray, so it is part of self-regulation. Maintaining focus may also depend on good working memory. Self-regulation itself is closely linked to self-control, the ability to act in a way that furthers your goals even when doing something else seems more immediately appealing. Having a lot of self-control, thus, helps kids get their homework done. Indeed, this trait is advantageous in so many situations that, research shows, it far outweighs IQ when it comes to measures of success, including your health and financial status as an adult...."

For more on executive functions and learning, and the importance of self-control, see feature article  By Ingrid Wickelgren“Schools Add Workouts for Attention, Grit and Emotional Control” in the September/October Scientific American Mind.)

(Click here for the original article)

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Stories of courage and persistence: 'everyday' heroes: Dyslexia no barrier to the reading life

Stories of courage and persistence: 'everyday' heroes: Dyslexia no barrier to the reading life | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

One of Lisa Hamilton’s clearest memories is the humiliating treatment she received from her Grade 3 teacher. “She would put me at the front of the class and keep slapping her hand on the desk in front of me constantly, telling me I was doing everything wrong when I tried to read,” says Hamilton, of Carleton Place, Ont., who is now in her 40s. “I remember her stare, her body language, all her comments and the way she would tell me to me to hurry because everyone was watching me. Everything she said and did was negative. When I tried to ask for help, she and all but one of the teachers I had afterwards brushed me off and made me feel I was stupid. “If you’re told something often enough, you start believing it.”……..

 

Marilyn Wilson of Appleton, Ont., had similar difficulties through school. “As a child, I couldn’t learn in school, so I was considered lazy,” she says. “I couldn’t learn how to read and write. The early grades were a very unhappy time for me. This was in the 1930s, so the teachers had no idea what was going on. They would lecture me about how I had to try harder and any time I was inattentive in class, they would send me to the library as a punishment. One time, I talked in the library, so, as a further punishment I had to read Dickens.” But with the help of her older half sister, who tutored her rigorously, she not only graduated from high school, she also completed undergraduate and graduate degrees. “The only way I got through high school was to study very, very hard,” says Wilson. “It always took me twice as long as anyone else to do my homework. I had to memorize everything. I did well by the end of high school, but I couldn’t have done it without my half sister. She tutored me every night. She listened to my homework, quizzed me and showed me new ways to do math. Most of all, she believed I could do it and that helped me a great deal.” Both women are now avid readers and have overcome their learning disabilities to go on to successful careers. Hamilton is a store manager. Wilson was the director of policy and planning for Planned Parenthood International in England and later headed the Canadian branch of the organization and held a similar position with Amnesty International in Ottawa before retiring……

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Dyslexia Dash 5k; Lawrence School, Sagamore Hills, OH: "Where Great Minds don't think alike"

Dyslexia Dash 5k; Lawrence School, Sagamore Hills, OH:  "Where Great Minds don't think alike" | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia Dash 5k and Prediction Run

Sunday October 21, 2012
1 Mile Fun Walk - 9:30am
5K Race - 10:00am

Race Entry
5k Run: $20.00 before 10/17/11, $25.00 on race day
1 Mile Fun Walk: $15.00 before 10/17/11, $20.00 on race day

 

Race Location:
Lawrence School
10036 Olde Eight Road
Sagamore Hills, OH 44067

 

This family-friendly event will raise awareness for language-based learning differences such as dyslexia, and provide an opportunity for runners and walkers of all ability levels to have fun and compete on an even playing field. Proceeds benefit NOBIDA and Lawrence School.

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College may never be the same: Massive Open Online Courses --MOOCs- USA TODAY

College may never be the same: Massive Open Online Courses --MOOCs- USA TODAY | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Jonathan Salovitz's course load sounds as grueling as any college undergraduate's: computer science, poetry, history, math and mythology, taught by professors at big-name schools such as Princeton and the University of Pennsylvania.
Except Salovitz, 23, is not an undergraduate. His effort won't count toward a bachelor's degree, and he hasn't paid a dime in tuition. Nor have his classmates, who number in the tens and even hundreds of thousands.
Instead, Salovitz calls himself a "guinea pig." He's participating in a grand experiment in higher education known as Massive Open Online Courses --MOOCs, for short. Learners of all ages around the world are flocking to them. Top universities are clamoring to participate. And MOOCs already have attracted the interest of some employers, paving the way for a potential revenue source. All in less than a year.
"The industry has operated more or less along the same business model and even the same technology for hundreds of years," says John Nelson, managing director of Moody's Higher Education. "MOOCS represent a rapidly developing and emerging change and that is very, very rare."

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Survey Executive Summary | General LD - NCLD

Survey Executive Summary | General LD - NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"NCLD collected data from a random sampling of 1,980 adults in the United States, evenly distributed across males and females, via an online survey in August 2012. The sampling is representative of the U.S. population with a margin of error of 4.4 percent.

Twelve percent of the respondents cited having a learning disability, and eight percent of the parents surveyed have a child with a learning disability.

Results reveal the need for more education about the causes, treatments of, and treatments for learning disabilities, and a better understanding of the rights of learning disabled people in the workplace...."

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Students with Learning Disabilities and College Admissions ...

Students with Learning Disabilities and College Admissions ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....If you are a student with a learning disability, there are several elements that are important to your success in applying to college. First, it is important to accurately and honestly be able to identify your strengths and weaknesses. Don’t hide from or be ashamed of your weaknesses. Work with them the best you can, and then shine in the areas of your strengths. I have worked with several students who have learning disabilities and learning differences. In many cases, their GPA (grade point average) is not necessarily an accurate reflection of what they really bring to a college, and the essay can be a great place to address that. While students are in no way required to disclose any learning issues, I think it is often beneficial to do so. I have seen a number of cases where a student discloses his or her disability but then goes on to talk about the hard work and commitment he or she employs to overcome their learning obstacles. By doing so, these students demonstrate to admissions officers that they know how to overcome a challenge, how to use available resources, and most importantly, how to succeed.

Students with learning differences are more common on college campuses today than they ever have been. You have nothing to hide or be embarrassed by as long as you know how to achieve some level of success, and for each of us, that means different things. If you’re thinking about going to college, then you probably already know what it takes to succeed".....

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Creating a Visual Dictionary on the iPad with PicCollage

Creating a Visual Dictionary on the iPad with PicCollage | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

The ideas was for the students to take photos, email photos from home or find photos online to represent their weekly Hebrew vocabulary words. Once the images are on the iPad, tap on the blank canvas and choose “Photos From Library” to import photos into PicCollage.


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The Social and Emotional Benefits of Being Weirdly Creative

The Social and Emotional Benefits of Being Weirdly Creative | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....Now I am keen to discover more about the social and emotional aspects of this learning strategy. Are relationships between students positively affected by arts integration? What about the rapport between kids and teachers? My young source holds forth with disarming confidence, especially about some of the toughest social and emotional issues middle school students face: fitting in with your peers, being different without becoming isolated, how to navigate the gauntlet of critics, teasers, and bullies that line the rocky path to high school.

I probe for more details. (Full disclosure: I, too, was a little guy, often defending myself against the big boys whenever they set out to prove their physical dominance. So I find my source's calm, rational discourse a bit too good to be true.) What I learn from him starts to soften me up.

I'll paraphrase his remarks: Expressing yourself creatively in front of an entire class, especially when you are not good at art, is the great equalizer. At first you feel pretty weird, especially singing and dancing. Because you've never done anything like this before, and you're not sure you want to work with other students this way. You think maybe someone will make fun of you. But because everybody has to sing and dance and do the art, everyone is in the same boat. It's harder to put someone down if you're the same as him.

(My source seems to relish this next part of his description.)........"


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TY @cdcowen 4 Viv Groskop: Anna Karenina stars are proof that dyslexia is no bar to creativity

TY @cdcowen 4 Viv Groskop: Anna Karenina stars are proof that dyslexia is no bar to creativity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

"......the premiere of Anna Karenina, a film featuring the talents of two more famous dyslexics, director Joe Wright and actress Keira Knightley. It's a movie everyone has wanted to hate, not least because Knightley-bashing has become something of a national sport. But the film is a triumph. And Knightley is tipped for an Oscar. People are fond of making fun of Keira, perhaps she is a bit too young and beautiful for comfort. How dare she be a good actress, too?

But she's not only good in this film. She's great. Which is no small thing when you realise that, when she was six, her mother bribed her into learning to read by promising to get her an acting agent. And that in her teens, she forced herself to overcome her difficulties by ploughing through a copy of Emma Thompson's screenplay for Sense and Sensibility. Her mother told her, "If Emma Thompson couldn't read, she'd make sure she'd get over it. So you have to start reading, because that's what Emma Thompson would do."

Wright's story is even more amazing. His dyslexia was mistaken for "stupidity". He left school with no GCSEs. He has said that the "stupid" label was one of the prime motivators in his success. "I guess I'm always feeling like I'm stupid and at the same time I want to prove that I'm not." Who, dyslexic or not, doesn't identify with that?

It seems somehow fitting that both Wright and Knightley have found success via an adaptation of a book which represents the highest achievement of the written word. It's great that it has taken two dyslexics – director and leading lady – to turn it into something that looks fresh, exciting and inspiring 140 years after the book first came out.

But there's a strange irony here, too. As Anna Karenina is released, politicians and teachers are still wrangling over whether GCSEs and A-levels are inflated or deflated. In an educational world focused on grades and measurable success, anyone who falls outside of the norm doesn't stand a chance....


Via Carolyn D Cowen
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International Dyslexia Association Recommended Reading List for Professionals | Dyslexia Tutor ...

International Dyslexia Association Recommended Reading List for Professionals | Dyslexia Tutor ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 Following is an International Dyslexia Association (IDA) “Fact Sheet” for professionals, listing recommended reading relating to issues of literacy and learning.

 

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Your Child's Rights |Learn the Law Disabilities rights - NCLD Public Policy

Your Child's Rights |Learn the Law  Disabilities rights  - NCLD Public Policy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Child disabilities rights - Several federal laws are designed to protect your child’s educational rights. If your child has a learning disability, he or she may qualify for additional protections. As a parent, it is important for you to understand these rights so you can better advocate for your child. For more details on the laws that affect all people with learning disabilities, visit our Learn the Law section.

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Jay Mathews, Washington Post Blog: Our ignorance of learning disabilities

Jay Mathews, Washington Post Blog: Our ignorance of learning disabilities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I don’t write much about special education, so I think I should take some of the blame for the results of a remarkable new survey of views on learning disabilities.

Raising the achievement of students with learning disabilities is hard, expensive, controversial and complex. School systems must pay private school tuition for students they can’t adequately serve. Educators and parents sometimes disagree on what methods to use. Education writers like me rarely deal with the subject because it is difficult to explain and lacks many success stories.

That explains in part why learning disabilities are so poorly understood, as revealed by a remarkable survey just released by the nonprofit National Center for Learning Disabilities. The representative sampling of 2,000 Americans provides a rare look at the depths of our ignorance.

Forty-three percent believe that learning disabilities correlate with IQ. Fifty-five percent think that corrective eyewear can treat certain learning disabilities. Twenty-two percent believe that learning disabilities can be caused by spending too much time watching computer or television screens. All of those impressions are wrong.

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Closing the achievement gap: It Takes a Village {plus great tech tools!}: « Bookshare Blog

Closing the achievement gap: It Takes a Village {plus great tech tools!}: « Bookshare Blog | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...Tammy Irvine, the Special Education teacher working with these students said, “Tools like Bookshare enable me to handle six different students, at different grade levels, with six different learning needs. We’re seeing results not just in their motivation and enjoyment of reading, but in their standardized test scores. While many factors contribute to improvement in scores, our special education students average English-Language Arts score increase was 51%;  from 10% proficiency to 61%, over six years. Over one year, our average increase in English Language Arts was 12%.”

 

 Closing the achievement gap is extremely important. It isn’t just the tools; it’s a combination of tools, leadership, effective teachers who know how to incorporate the tools, and supportive parents. We thank you all for your initiative and support.”

Seeing the success of these students with learning differences was a very moving and motivating experience that stimulated discussion among all participants about technology, special education and future programs. Don Vu, the principal of Toyon, said that he’s focused on technology in the last few years. “I can see how it helps kids get engaged. Technology gives instantaneous corrective feedback, which is particularly helpful when a teacher has 24 students and can’t be next to each one all the time.”

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Debunking the myths about learning disabilities | Living | Rock Hill Herald Online

Debunking the myths about learning disabilities | Living | Rock Hill Herald Online | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....A few words of warning: Parents are often targeted by unscrupulous people and companies promising to “cure” your child’s LD. There is no such thing......"

 

"....As mentioned above, LDs aren’t something one grows out of – so save your money. But there are steps you can take to ensure that your son succeeds in school and in life......."

 

"...There’s been a lot of research in the past few years looking into the connection (or lack) between vaccines and learning disabilities or any other health risk. The evidence is quite conclusive: According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD) there is absolutely no evidence – scientific or otherwise – that vaccines cause learning disabilities. Unfortunately, your friends aren’t the only ones who are confused about learning disabilities, called LD. The NCLD (ncld.org) just did a study and found that a large percentage of Americans don’t really understand what LDs are and what causes them...."

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Center for Education Reform Pres., Jeanne Allen: testimony to NJ Committee Re: On Online Learning-

Center for Education Reform Pres., Jeanne Allen: testimony to NJ Committee Re: On Online Learning- | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

President of The Center for Education Reform Jeanne Allen testifies before the Joint Committee on the Public Schools in New Jersey about Online Learning. Her testimony shares facts about the schools that deploy digital learning, the parents who utilize online learning opportunities, and the teachers who lead and instruct in the digital learning world.

Read her full testimony here. You can also access the entire hearing from the New Jersey Legislature’s website.

 

"...MYTH: Online Learning is Only for Gifted Students In the past, online learning was seen as a tool for gifted students who needed to surge ahead, or for child athletes and actors who had to be away from home for long periods of time. That is simply not the case anymore. Digital learning, because it is individualized to the students’ strengths is a great tool for all types of students, including at-risk, those who live in rural areas and don’t have many school choice options, or those with special needs. Online learning is a great tool for students who may be behind in their classes, because students can work at their own pace and review subjects that may be difficult for them. MYTH: Online Learning is Only Available to Families with Computers. Recently, in New Jersey, an online charter school’s application was rejected because the state believed that online learning eliminates families without a home computer or Internet access. However, that is not the case. Many schools that offer blended learning, meaning that one or two classes are online and the rest are in classrooms, provide the proper technology, access and computers within the school to facilitate learning. Complete online school programs provide each student with a computer and access to the web so no child is turned away for their socioeconomic status...."

 

 

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Walk for CT Children’s Dyslexia Center~Oct. 14 | Issues. People. Events.

Walk for CT Children’s Dyslexia Center~Oct. 14 | Issues. People. Events. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Children’s Dyslexia Center of Connecticut hopes that you, your family and your friends will once again join us, at our October 14 dyslexia awareness walk, to raise program support funds and public awareness about this common learning disability known as Dyslexia. The Dyslexia Center’s staff over the past several years has worked tirelessly to provide the one on one instruction necessary for students in the program to be able to succeed in the business world and in life itself. Now, more than ever, you can directly affect the program’s success through various fundraising measures. Donations and annual contributions from people such as yourselves is what allows this program to continue providing the tools necessary to help these students overcome the difficulties they will face in everyday life. Many of us look for ways to make a difference in the lives of those who are truly in need and just knowing that your contribution no matter how large or small made a measurable difference in the lives of these children is fulfilling. If you ever knew someone who had or has a “Learning Disability”, then you also know the challenges they have faced or are still facing going forward, especially from their peers. If this someone is your child, then you understand.

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Parent's Guide to IDEA Federal Education Law | Children with Needs - NCLD

Parent's Guide to IDEA  Federal Education Law | Children with Needs - NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Children with disabilities & special needs - The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is the key federal education law that serves students with LD. Being informed will help you support your child’s learning needs and advocate for his or her success. Visit the chapters below for information on requesting an evaluation, student discipline, and more.

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Bookshare helps students with learning differences learn - San Jose Mercury News

Bookshare helps students with learning differences learn - San Jose Mercury News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....Since is debut in 2002, Bookshare has transformed not only reading but schooling for students with various disabilities. The program, an initiative of the Palo Alto-based nonprofit Benetech, produces an online library of accessible books for those visually or severely physically disabled or with learning disabilities like dyslexia. Through a grant from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Special Education, Bookshare's library of nearly 160,000 titles are provided free to students who qualify.
On Tuesday, federal Department of Education officials will visit Toyon Elementary in San Jose to highlight the role of digital technology in improving learning. The department has awarded Benetech another five-year grant, for $6.5 million annually, to expand and maintain Bookshare...."

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Dyslexia is widely misunderstood and profoundly impacts learning, according to the U.S. DOH & NCLD

Dyslexia is widely misunderstood and profoundly impacts learning, according to the U.S. DOH & NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".......If someone tells you that dyslexia does not exist or “went out of style,” run, don’t walk, to a more accurate source.

While some states like California are considering eliminating the term dyslexia as a learning disability, many children struggle with reading and writing tasks that may not have a better explanation.

Affecting roughly 15 percent of the general population and often running in families, dyslexia is widely misunderstood and profoundly impacts learning, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the National Center for Learning Disabilities.
In a typical school serving 500 children, that translates to roughly 75 dyslexic students exhibiting varying degrees of reading difficulties ranging from mild to severe.
For a variety of reasons, many of these students may not be identified in the special education system.
As children head back to school, we all share the hope that it will be a successful year. We cannot leave this 15 percent of our children out of the equation.
It is a particularly compelling time of year to ask the question: Is your child or student dyslexic? Do you know what signs to look for?
First and foremost, dyslexia is a well-understood, clearly defined condition....."

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TY @courosa for: 10 Ideas for Classroom Video Projects | open thinking

TY @courosa for: 10 Ideas for Classroom Video Projects | open thinking | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In this post, I share ideas on certain types of videos that I’ve gathered and how educators might use related methods or styles to engage students in constructing and deconstructing media while becoming critical consumers and producers of digital media.


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Selecting best apps 4 your students: Rubrics for Evaluating Educational Apps | AvatarGeneration

Selecting best apps 4 your students: Rubrics for Evaluating Educational Apps | AvatarGeneration | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
How do you choose the best app for your classroom? Check out this great post from Tony Vincent on LearningHand, sharing his own rubric to help teachers evaluate educational apps and other rubric resources.

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Educators Evaluate 'Flipped Classrooms' define 'mastery based flipped instruction'| Andrew K. Miller

Educators Evaluate 'Flipped Classrooms'  define 'mastery based flipped instruction'| Andrew K. Miller | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

Mastery based 'flipped instruction defined:

 

"Jonathan Bergmann, the lead technology facilitator for the 600-student K-8 Kenilworth school district in Illinois, is considered one of the pioneers of the flipped movement. He and his former fellow teacher Aaron Sams began using the flipping technique in 2006 at the 950-student Woodland Park High School in Woodland Park, Calif., to teach chemistry.


Tips for Flipping
1. Don’t get hung up on creating your own videos. While some believe that students prefer to see their own teacher in the videos, others recommend harnessing the educational content that is already available on the Web. Resources such as the Khan Academy, YouTube EDU, and PBS can provide well-produced video content for your students.
2. Be thoughtful about what parts of your class you decide to “flip” and when. Deciding to flip part of your lesson will not automatically make it a better lesson. You have to be intentional about when to flip and clear about what the benefit will be for students.
3. If possible, find a partner to create videos with. Students enjoy hearing the back-and-forth conversation of two teachers, especially when one teacher plays the role of mentor while the other plays the role of learner.
4. Address the issue of access early. Survey your students to find out what technology they have at home, and find alternatives for students who lack Internet access. Alternatives may mean burning the videos onto DVDs or creating lists of places where students can go online.
5. Find a way to engage students in the videos. Just having students watch videos instead of listening to lectures doesn’t guarantee that they will be more engaged. Requiring students to take notes on the videos, ask questions
about the videos, or engage in discussion about them will help ensure that they watch and absorb the material.
The pair created videos of their lectures and posted them online for their chemistry and Advanced Placement chemistry classes during the 2007-08 school year. They required the students to take notes on the videos and come to class with one thoughtful question to share.
The teachers found that the technique allowed them to spend more time with students one-on-one and to provide just-in-time intervention when students needed it. They also noticed an uptick in test scores in the students using the flipped-class technique.
Soon they began visiting other schools that were curious about the method and hosting conferences on flipping. They recently co-wrote a book called Flip Your Classroom: Reach Every Student in Every Class Every Day, published in July of 2012 by the International Society for Technology in Education and the ASCD.
“You need to figure out the answer to the question: What’s the best use of your face-to-face instruction time?” Mr. Bergmann said.
After the first year, he and Mr. Sams made adjustments to the flipped classroom, moving from what they call the “traditional” flip to the “mastery based” flipped classroom.
In the mastery-based model, students are not required to watch videos at home on a specific day. Instead, they are given an outline for each unit that includes all the resources they might need for each objective, including videos, worksheets, and textbook excerpts. They can then work through the material at their own pace, even taking tests and quizzes and performing labs when they are ready rather than as a whole class....."

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Executive function: Parenting A-Z

At the center of a child’s ability to take in knowledge and accomplish tasks and goals is what is known as executive functions. These are the functions of the brain that work to manage the attention span, emotions and behaviors of a person. More specifically, executive functions include a person’s ability to:

• Plan ahead
• Organize
• Maintain attention and focus
• Recall memories
• Remember details
• Sort out and categorize thoughts
• Problem-solve
• Monitor use of time and space
• Regulate actions and behaviors
• Successfully see a task or challenge all the way through (regardless of the outcome)

The front part of the brain that controls these functions is not fully developed in very young children. They begin to appear during the preschool years as the brain matures and continue to develop well into early adulthood.

Throughout the preschool years and into kindergarten, your child will begin to show changes in their ability to pay attention to tasks at hand a bit longer. When attention span improves, so does their memory. Provide your child with opportunities to engage in experiences through play, and supporting their actions throughout the process. This will give your child the practice they need to develop some of the executive functions further.

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Common Warning Signs of Dyslexia in Children in Grades 3-8 - NCLD

Common Warning Signs of Dyslexia in Children in Grades 3-8 - NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Dyslexia is a learning disability that affects reading, writing, and spelling. Learn common dyslexia symptoms and warning signs for students grades 3 to 8.

Dyslexia is a language-based processing disorder that can hinder reading, writing, spelling, and speaking, as well as social interactions and self-esteem. Are you concerned that your child isn’t learning, communicating, or relating to others as successfully as his or her peers? Does your child especially struggle with reading? Is it affecting your child’s confidence and motivation? If so, the following list of common warning signs of dyslexia in children in Grades 3-8 may help clarify your concerns.

Everyone struggles with learning at times. Learning disabilities (LD) such as dyslexia, however, are consistent and persist over time. The following list is a general guide, not a tool to identify dyslexia. Our Interactive Learning Disabilities Checklist is an additional resource to consider. Finally, be aware that some of the "symptoms" listed below also apply to other learning disabilities as well as other disorders such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD), which often co-exists with LD .

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Hollie Lancarte's curator insight, June 7, 2013 3:40 PM

Handout for teachers to assist with Dyslexia resources.