Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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TY! @wendi322 for Listening to Students (at school and at home!)

TY! @wendi322 for Listening to Students (at school and at home!) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....Last week, my son's third grade teacher sent home what at first glance looked like a long homework assignment -- three sets of survey questions with many lines for his responses. After reading the directions, we learned that I was to ask him the questions and transcribe his responses. Each night we settled down for what turned into a thoughtful, reflective conversation about my child: his reading preferences, learning style, interests, likes and dislikes, fears and hopes.

I thought I knew my kid, but I was surprised by some of his responses.....

....Just by asking these kinds of questions teachers can create a classroom culture where student voice is valued, where students feel their needs will be attended to, and where students begin to trust their teacher...

So what might you ask your students? Well, what do you want to know?

Here are some of the questions I asked students:

Tell me about a teacher you really liked and what he/she did that you appreciated
Tell me about a teacher that you felt wasn't effective and why
What do you think makes a "good" teacher?
Describe the most interesting activity you ever did in school
Describe the most challenging class or unit of study
How do you like to get feedback?
If I notice that you're not following one of our classroom agreements, how would you like me to let you know?
On a scale of 1-5, how much do you like reading?
(1: not at all, 2: sort of/sometimes, 3: most of the time, 4: I like reading, 5: I LOVE reading)
On a scale of 1-5, how would you rate your reading skills?
(1: I'm a terrible reader, 2: I'm not a very good reader, 3: I'm an ok reader, 4: I'm a good reader, 5: I'm a really, really good reader)
What did you read last year in school or outside of school?
Who do you know who likes to read?
Outside of school, who do you think believes in you and supports you most?
Who do you want me to tell when you do really well in school?
Tell me about something that's been hard for you in your life
Tell me about something you feel proud of
Tell me about something you love doing that has nothing to do with school
What's your favorite thing to do on the weekend?
If you could have three wishes, what would they be?
What would you like to know about me?
What else can you tell me that would help me be a better teacher to you?....."

 

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Harvard Business review: Three Leadership Traits that Never Go Out of Style

Harvard Business review: Three Leadership Traits that Never Go Out of Style | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Trust, empathy, and mentoring constitute the foundations of leadership.

 

"Trust: Do your team members trust you? Do they accept that you will, without doubt, stand up for them whatever the situation? Only that kind of trust makes people feel empowered, gives them the courage to innovate, take risks, and to push themselves beyond their comfort zones to find success."

 

"Empathy: Did you notice that look of anxiety as your teammate walked into office this morning? Or did you miss it because you were busy fretting about deadlines? Do you treat your team members as human beings, and not just as workers?"

 

 

"Mentorship: No matter how talented we may be, we crave the guiding hand, the mentor who will teach us the rules of the game. Pat Riley, the widely respected NBA coach, once said that there was no great player who didn't want to be coached. The same holds true of work. Would you be where you are today if your first manager hadn't nudged you in the right direction? When people are perplexed about what the future holds for their organizations and themselves, mentorship is critical."


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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You MUST see at least the first 4 min of this: Sarah Kay: If I should have a daughter ... | Video on TED.com

 

Sarah Kay will be at the Ruffing Montessori School, in Cleveland Hieghts, OH on October 11, 2012 at 7:00pm. 

 

My recommendation: Sarah was a featured speaker at the Annual Conference of the National Association of Independent schools in 2011 and received satnding ovations. Her performance of spoken word poetry was riveting.  She cast a spell over the room and held an audience of over 3,000 hearts in the palms of her hands--and went she released us----we were in tears-- standing on higher gound. 

 

 

TED Talks "If I should have a daughter, instead of Mom, she's gonna call me Point B ... " began spoken word poet Sarah Kay, in a talk that inspired two standing ovations at TED2011.

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3 MinVideo the characters of The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia:Advice for Parents

From the main characters of The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia comes sage advice for parents from those who have been there.

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50 Useful Apps For Students With Reading Disabilities

50 Useful Apps For Students With Reading Disabilities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

While there are numerous technologies out there that can help students with disabilities, perhaps one of the richest is the iPad, which offers dozens of applications designed to meet the needs of learning disabled kids and beginning readers alike.

Here, are just a few of the amazing apps out there that can help students with a reading disability improve their skills not only in reading, writing, and spelling, but also get a boost in confidence and learn to see school as a fun, engaging activity, not a struggle.


Via Maggie Rouman, Carolyn D Cowen
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Infographic: 6 Types of Blended Learning

Infographic: 6 Types of Blended Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Blended Learning is not so much an innovation as it is a natural by-product of the digital domain creeping into physical boundaries. As digital and social media become more and more prevalent in the life of learners, it was only a matter of time before learning became “blended” by necessity.

That said, there’s a bit more to Blended and “Hybrid” Learning than throwing in a little digital learning.

6 Types of Blended Learning

Face-to-face Driver
Rotation
Flex
Online Lab
Self-Blend
Online Driver
The following infographic takes a different approach to the concept, labeling it “Disruptive,” and even offering an interesting matrix. One interesting prediction? By 2014, 50% of all post-secondary learners will take a class online.

 

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Personal Story: the Key to Success in school and college for students with LD - NCLD

Personal Story:  the Key to Success in school and college for students with LD - NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
NCLD intern Jillian Levy shares her story of how building self-confidence helped her be a successful student with LD.

"..I remember feeling a huge sense of relief because I no longer needed to endlessly search for the reasons behind my difficulties. Instead, I began to understand my learning disabilities so that I could figure out what I could do to learn at the best of my ability and stop comparing myself to my peers, as I had done in the past. I felt an even bigger change in myself once I started working with my special education teachers and using the testing accommodations in my Individualized Education Program (IEP).

The testing accommodations granted by my IEP allowed extra time to complete tests (“time and a half”) and a separate, quiet location for me to take my exams. The testing accommodations really helped me change my report card and more importantly, my self-esteem. I was excelling and felt more confident than ever as I started focusing on my achievements without comparing them to my peers. I also began studying differently as I learned new techniques from my special education teachers and tutors. As high school came to a close, I felt pretty confident going into college understanding my LD and advocating for what I needed most.

However, like most college freshmen, I felt like a fish out of water for the first semester of college. It was difficult being in a new place, making new friends and going to class all at the same time. When the time came for me to take my first exams I was completely scared, but knowing that I had my testing accommodations really helped calm me down and focus on the exams. As the semesters went on my self-confidence increased drastically. I no longer felt like I was battling with my learning disability and self-esteem. Instead I was learning how to achieve my highest goals.

Overall, I believe it was my understanding of how I work best as a student that helped me succeed. I put effort into not comparing myself to others and how they learn. This is easier said than done, but it truly helped me..."

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Dyslexia Awareness Month: Do You Know the Early Warning Signs of This Learning Difference? | Learning Ally, formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Dyslexia Awareness Month: Do You Know the Early Warning Signs of This Learning Difference? | Learning Ally, formerly Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....Although many children with learning differences actually have above-average intelligence, Dr. Dawson advises parents to listen to their instincts instead of waiting it out. “Studies show that a child’s reading skill level at the end of kindergarten is highly predictive of where their reading skills will be in third grade,” she says. “The idea that it might just ‘click’ one day if you wait long enough is in fact not substantiated by research.”

Many children with learning differences suffer from low self-esteem as a byproduct of their reading challenges, and large percentages end up dropping out of school if they never receive help. But the good news is that there are many resources that can help children with learning differences achieve reading success....."

Learning Ally's blog, Access and Achievement, focuses on topics going on in the blind and visually impaired and learning disabled community.
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Executive Functioning | Executive Function Disorder - NCLD

Executive Functioning | Executive Function Disorder - NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...If you hear "executive function" and think of a successful CEO, think again! Every one of us uses executive functions daily as we think, process, and perform various tasks. Several executive skills fall under this "mental umbrella" — and each of us is stronger in some than in others.

Learning disabilities and weak executive function often go hand-in-hand. Visit our executive functioning section to learn more about executive function (and dysfunction) and how it may look in your child with LD. There's a lot of information and insight here, so put on your thinking cap (which, as you will learn, is as unique as you are)...."

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50 Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language

50 Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Teaching a new language to non-native speakers may be one of the most challenging educational jobs out there, so ELL teachers can use all of the help they can get! Thankfully, many excellent resources for ELL and ESL exist online, from full-service websites to reference tools and communities, all designed to make the task of educating ELL students just a little bit easier and more effective.

We’ve scoured the Internet to share 50 of the best of these resources, and we hope you’ll find lots of valuable content and tools through these incredibly useful links for ELL educators.

Websites

Resource tools, printables, and other great stuff for ELL educators are all available on these sites.


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Here we can find  50 of the best links for teaching a new language.

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Student Scientist: How I Overcame Dyslexia and Am Pursuing My Dream

Student Scientist: How I Overcame Dyslexia and Am Pursuing My Dream | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Science has always been one of the anchors of my life. When I was in preschool, my big brother let me help with his school science projects and I fell in love with the amazing world of scientific inquiry. Later, my mother introduced me to the real-world applications of science, taking me to NASA's Space Camp and Pilot Camps.

But the thrills of hands-on science collided with my difficulty reading the words on the pages of my science textbooks. I was diagnosed with dyslexia in the second grade. Because the traditional phonics method of learning to read does not work for dyslexic students, I was pulled out of class in second and third grade to work with a specialist, where I learned to read by "coding" words.

My classmates teased me about needing "special" help. The teasing caused me a lot of tears, but I did not give up. I decided to educate my classmates about dyslexia. When oral reports were assigned, I talked about learning differences..."

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Pediatric Therapy: Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and Twice Exceptional Children

Pediatric Therapy: Social and Emotional Needs of Gifted and Twice Exceptional Children | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....Gifted and twice exceptional children (defined as gifted with a disability) present with a unique set of social and emotional needs that requires adaptation in therapeutic approaches and therapist knowledge of issues specific to the gifted population.

Giftedness is typically defined by advanced intellectual functioning and most often identified by standardized IQ testing. Recently the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) revised its definition of giftedness by referring to advanced levels of aptitude or competence in the top 10% or rarer. Children who are identified as gifted are noted to have high potential for talent development in one or more domain such as mathematics, language, athletics, music or art. While definitions of giftedness may vary, most professional recognize that gifted children often possess a cluster of characteristics that may include:

Emotional sensitivity and intensity
Moral intensity
High degree of compassion
Highly imaginative and creative
Perfectionism
Tendency to question authority
Overly concerned with justice, fairness
Perseverant and highly focused on specific areas of interest
High levels of energy or activity
Preference for older companions, adult interaction
Heightened awareness, keen observation skills
Strong curiosity, desire for knowledge....."

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The International Dyslexia Association Promoting literacy through research, education and advocacy

The International Dyslexia Association Promoting literacy through research, education and advocacy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

How fitting that the International Dyslexia Association’s first “conference tweet chat” is taking place at one of our most forward-thinking sessions, “Neuroscience in the 21st Century: Where are we going?.” This symposium, chaired and organized by Dr. Gordon Sherman, convenes October 24 (8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.) at our 63rd annual conference in Baltimore, MD.

Here is the plan:

During the symposium (and before), we will monitor (but not project) a Twitter feed, from which we will pull questions for our distinguished panel of speakers—Drs. Gordon Sherman, Jeffrey Gilger, John Gabrielli, Albert Galaburda, Brock and Fernette Eide, and Guinevere Eden.

This is a unique opportunity to pose questions to our speakers and to discuss (via Twitter) topics and issues addressed in the symposium. Normally, this kind of engagement is not possible in a session so tightly scheduled. Indeed, it is unlikely that our speakers will have much time to take questions directly from the audience during the symposium.

So, bring your smart phone or laptop to this important session to follow and join the conversation and to tweet your questions (in 140 characters or less) at this hashtag: HASHTAG: #IDA21CNeuro. (When you click on this link, it will take you to a Twitter search page. Copy/paste the hashtag into either search box to get directly to the hashtag feed. Still having trouble getting to the hashtag feed? Pop a tweet to @cdcowen, she'll tweet you the link!)

In fact, you can jump on that hashtag now. Carolyn D. Cowen and Earl Oremus—the symposium’s education responders—already are monitoring the hashtag. (Carolyn and Earl are charged with crafting questions focusing on the symposium’s educational implications.)

Neuroscience meets Twitter at International Dyslexia Association conference http://www.interdys.org/NeuroscienceMeetsTwitter.htm #...


Via Carolyn D Cowen
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Personalize Learning: Blended Learning is Not the Only Way to Personalize Learning

Personalize Learning: Blended Learning is Not the Only Way to Personalize Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
blended learning, flipping the classroom, personalized learning, student-centered...

 

"....The research at the Students at the Center (studentsatthecenter.org) wrote nine reports on student-centered learning. Eric Toshalls, Ed.D., and Michael Nakkula, Ed.D. in one report, wrote the research on “Learning Theory: Motivation, Engagement and Student Voice” that described:

The Trifecta of Student Centered Learning

Motivation - Without motivation, there is no push to learn
Engagement - Without engagement, there is no way to learn
Voice - Without voice, there is no authenticity in learning

“For students to create a new knowledge, to succeed academically, and to develop into healthy adults, they require each of these experiences.”
Toshalls and Nakkula..."


Via Charles Newton
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InBrief: Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning

InBrief: Executive Function: Skills for Life and Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Being able to focus, hold and work with information in mind, filter distractions, and switch gears is like having a sophisticated air traffic control system to manage information at a busy airport. In the brain, this mechanism is called executive function and self-regulation, a group of skills that, with the right formative experiences, begin to develop in early childhood and continue to improve through the early adult years. A new evidence base has identified these skills as essential for school achievement, success in work, and healthy lives. This two-page summary—part of the InBrief series—outlines how these lifelong skills develop, what can disrupt their development, and how supporting them pays off in school and life. The brief provides an overview of Building the Brain's "Air Traffic Control" System: How Early Experiences Shape the Development of Executive Function, the joint Working Paper by the National Scientific Council on the Developing Child and the National Forum on Early Childhood Policy and Programs."

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Dyslexic Celebs Who Made It Big - ABC News

Dyslexic Celebs Who Made It Big - ABC News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"As many as 15 percent of the world's population exhibits some of the symptoms of dyslexia, according to the International Dyslexia Association, and not surprisingly, a great number of them are famous.

Steven Spielberg is the latest celebrity to come forward with his struggle with the learning disability.

"It's extremely inspiring for youngsters who struggle with dyslexia to see people like Steven Spielberg, who not only succeed but succeed well," Dr. Stefani Hines, an expert in the disorder at Beaumont Hospitals in Royal Oaks, Mich., told ABCNews.com."

 

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Presentation Skills: Five Things You Need To Know About People To Deliver Great Presentations

Robin Good: A short video doodle illustrating how five underconsidered factors have tremendous impact on the quality of your presentations, whether online or live.

 

"Great presenters understand how people think, learn, and react. In this video Dr. Weinschenk shares 5 Things from her book, "100 Things Every Presenter Needs To Know About People".

 

Recommended. 9/10



Via Cornélia Castro, Paksorn Runlert, Robin Good, David McQueen, HIND ABDELRAHMAN, Lynnette Van Dyke, Carolyn D Cowen
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Lou Salza's curator insight, March 3, 2013 6:36 PM

Concise and and useful!

Ana Velazquez S's curator insight, March 20, 2013 4:29 PM

Habilidades necesarias para lograr una presentación exitosa con tu audiencia

Jean Luc lebrun's curator insight, June 9, 2014 4:46 PM

Behind these video doodles is an fun company: www.truscribe.com

What is interesting here is that the video is in perfect sync with the audio - this is why it is so powerful..

More critically, something is missing from the video: a summary. The author summarizes with "So there you have it, five things you need to know about people in order to give a better presentation", followed by a rapid zoom out revealing briefly ALL the pictures from the storyboard - too many and too fast to be of use as a memory prop.

Five may be a small number, but for our limited memory - it is huge. We have to remember five more or less disconnected ideas: 20 minute chunks, eye competes with ear, your speech is only a part of whole message (see nice screen illustration at time 3:36), call them to action, people imitate your feelings. It feels like a bullet list. The video could have brought back 5 key images corresponding to the 5 points to help anchor them in our memory.

This is why I recommend that the "take-away" slide, a.k.a. the conclusion or summary slide, refreshes people's memory by bringing back small pictures of the key visuals of the presentation next to the text points that they helped make. It does not matter if they are not fully readable, their role is simply to jog memory.

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50 Top Sources Of Free eLearning Courses

50 Top Sources Of Free eLearning Courses | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Whether you are looking for a master’s degree program, computer science classes, a K-12 curriculum, or GED study program, this list gives you a look at 50 websites that promise education for free.

From databases that organize over 1,000,000 students throughout 16 universities, to a small library of documents for those interested in history, the opportunities for free online learning continue to expand as the Internet becomes a crucial component in education.


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: The 'Blooming' Orange

Cool Tools for 21st Century Learners: The 'Blooming' Orange | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"I've always been interested in new ways to view and think about Bloom's Taxonomy and the folks at Learning Today have created a poster worth sharing. To help teachers get thinking about ways to apply Bloom's higher-order thinking skills in the classroom, they've put a spin on the traditional hierarchy and limited the number of verbs in each section to create The Blooming Orange.

They've popped Bloom's verbage into the segments of an orange and intentionally depicted it as a circle to illustrate the fact that often these skills do not occur in isolation, they often occur simultaneously. This Blooming Orange presents itself as a teacher-friendly tool for planning and possibly an easier way for everyone to think about Bloom's. Be sure to click on the link below to visit the Learning Today blog and print a copy of this poster to hang in your classroom."

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Dyslexia Awareness Month: San Diego news: Kids can eat, stay, and play for free in October

Dyslexia Awareness Month: San Diego news: Kids can eat, stay, and play for free in October | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
““During the entire month of October, kids eat, stay and play for free throughout San Diego. Take advantage of great deals at over 100 participating partners and get ready for the ultimate family vacation.”

The San Diego Convention and Visitors Bureau’s announcement on Wednesday, September 26, 2012 comes at a perfect time for families and schools. By now, many students have settled in into the new school year and are beginning to get restless.

Taking advantage of this wonderful offer provides an excellent opportunity for all children, but especially children with learning disabilities to spend their energy outside of the classroom; a much needed balance for the energy of children with dyslexia, ADD/ADHD, and emotional disabilities."

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Steven Spielberg Escaped His Dyslexia Through Filmmaking

Steven Spielberg Escaped His Dyslexia Through Filmmaking | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

                                                                               (Image Credit: Mark Davis/Getty Images) Usually behind the scenes, filmmaker Steven Spielberg stepped in front of the camera to talk for the first time about his dyslexia

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The ACT Overtakes the SAT: "What's up with that? " TY! @anniemurphypaul

The ACT Overtakes the SAT: "What's up with that? " TY! @anniemurphypaul | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...ACT has shrewdly marketed its exam to many states as a replacement for (or supplement to) high school exit exams, arguing that adoption will reduce the number of tests a college-bound student must take while encouraging more teenagers to consider college. As a result, virtually 100 percent of students in nine states — including populous ones such as Illinois, Michigan and Colorado — automatically take the ACT with taxpayers footing the bill.” Read more here...."

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How kids outsmart learning differences

How kids outsmart learning differences | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Anthony Vo, a second-year medical student at the University of Ottawa, says he logs up to three hours of studying for every hour his classmates hit the books. But it’s not because he is a keener.

Vo, 22, has learning disabilities. Compared to most adults, Vo has trouble memorizing facts and gaining information through listening, language and reading. Being in an environment that taxes the learning capacity of the highest of achievers “kind of puts me at a disadvantage,” he says.

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Steven Spielberg on unlocking 'tremendous mystery' of his dyslexia

Steven Spielberg on unlocking 'tremendous mystery' of his dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Movies helped Steven Spielberg cope with his dyslexia, the director of "Jaws" and "Schindler's List" said in a rare interview about being diagnosed with the learning disability five years ago.

"It was like the last puzzle part in a tremendous mystery that I've kept to myself all these years," Spielberg, 65, told the website "Friends of Quinn."

As a child, Spielberg said he learned to read two years later than his classmates, which made him subject to teasing and caused him to dread school.

PHOTOS: Celebrities by the Times

That bullying made its way into Spielberg's work as a filmmaker -- the story for the 1985 movie "The Goonies," which Spielberg executive produced, was inspired by Spielberg's own friendships with a group of fellow outcasts, he said.

"I was a member of the goon squad," Spielberg said.

Spielberg also discussed going back to college in his 50s to complete the bachelor's degree he abandoned in 1968 to pursue filmmaking, and confessed that he takes more than twice as long as most of his peers in Hollywood to read books and scripts.

Spielberg gave the interview to Quinn Bradlee, author of the memoir "A Different Life: Growing Up Learning Disabled and Other Adventures" and proprietor of the online community for people with learning disabilities, "Friends of Quinn."

"I never felt like a victim," Spielberg said. "Movies really helped me... kind of saved me from shame, from guilt... Making movies was my great escape."

Spielberg's next film the historical drama "Lincoln," arrives in theaters Nov. 9.

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Carson Everett's curator insight, March 18, 2015 10:07 PM

This article is about Steven Spielberg’s struggle with dyslexia. I have watched a lot of his movies but I never knew that he had a disability. I think it is especially interesting because he is a prominent figure in the entertainment industry. Spielberg has to read many different movie scripts, and the fact that he has successfully coped with his disability is a really good example for others with disabilities. In the article, Spielberg explains the difficulties he faced during his childhood. He was teased and bullied for being behind a level in reading. I wish that more people in Hollywood would be open to sharing their disability. It makes actors and actresses seem more human and relatable. I also think that actors and actresses can be very influential in how people evaluate people with disabilities. If more celebrities accept disabilities, I think that more people would be accepting. 

Julia Wilkins's comment, March 19, 2015 1:06 AM
How interesting! I never knew Steven Spielberg had dyslexia. That really should give students a lot of hope for being able to pursue their passion!
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University of Southern Mississippi to offer dyslexia therapy master's - The Sacramento Bee

University of Southern Mississippi to offer dyslexia therapy master's - The Sacramento Bee | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

HATTIESBURG, Miss. -- The University of Southern Mississippi plans to offer a master's degree in dyslexia therapy starting next June.

Officials say it will teach using sound, sight, touch and movement to help children learn to read. Other features include speaking slowly to give children more time to understand and to watch the speaker's lip movements.

Students also will take courses in typical language development, the structure of the language, reading development, research and related areas.

Officials say it will be the first such program at a public university in Mississippi. It says the Dubard School for Language Disorders and the Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Special Education have been working on it for more than three years.

Mississippi College, a private school, offers a master's in dyslexia therapy.

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