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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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TED Blog | The World Peace Game: John Hunter on TED.com

TED Blog | The World Peace Game: John Hunter on TED.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

John Hunter puts all the problems of the world on a 4′x5′ plywood board — and lets his 4th-graders solve them. At TED2011, he explains how his World Peace Game engages schoolkids, and why the complex lessons it teaches — spontaneous, and always surprising — go further than classroom lectures can. (Recorded at TED2011, March 2011, in Long Beach, CA. Duration: 20:28)

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12 Questions to Ask About a College's Disability Services | The ...

12 Questions to Ask About a College's Disability Services | The ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

Like other college-bound students, those with learning differences or ADHD should make a point of visiting colleges before applying. However, in addition to visiting the admissions office, these students should also make a beeline to the Office of Disability Services to look for another type of match: support services with the appropriate accommodations for their needs.

Although all colleges are required by law to offer support services and accommodations, the level of support and types of accommodations available to students with learning differences varies widely from campus to campus, ranging from basic to comprehensive.

A visit to the Office of Disability Services is an opportunity to ask about the availability of support and accommodations that will help the student be successful in college by putting him or her on a level playing field with peers.

 

Here are important questions to ask:

 

How current must my testing be to to apply for accommodations?

How many students use your services?
What Assistive Technology (AT) services do you offer? Do you have an AT expert on staff?
What accommodations do you offer? What are the procedures and timelines to receive them?
How many Disabilities Support counselors do you have on your staff? Do they act as liasions?
If a professor is not in compliance regarding the student’s needed accommodations, how is the situation resolved?
What is the procedure to get extended time on exams? How much notice is required? Do students arrange extended time with professors or through the Disabilities Services Office?
Where do students take exams? Who proctors?
What do you consider the most difficult majors/classes for Disabilities Support students on this campus?
Will I have both an advisor in the Disabilities Services Office and a regular academic advisor? If both, how will the two advisors work with each other?
What is the four-year graduation rate for students with learning disabilities similar to mine?
Do you track students who have used your services after graduation? If so, what do your findings show about their success after graduation?

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Real A, Rapper DJ talks to 3 time Wrld Champ. Formula 1 driver,Sir Jackie Stewart about dyslexia-

Real A, Rapper DJ talks to 3 time Wrld Champ. Formula 1 driver,Sir Jackie Stewart about dyslexia- | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Real A, Rapper DJ, had a once in a lifetime opportunity to interview the legendary Scottish three-time world Formula One racing driver, Sir Jackie Stewart, President of Dyslexia Scotland, and ask him about his own personal ...

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Livescribe Echo smartpen can help students take notes in class so they never miss a word.

Livescribe Echo smartpen can help students take notes in class so they never miss a word. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

We're very excited that Livescribe was featured today on CNET's How-To blog! CNET demonstrated all the ways the Livescribe Echo smartpen can help students when taking notes in class so they never miss a word.


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Videos Suggested for Back to School Faculty Meetings and other educational audiences

Videos Suggested for Back to School Faculty Meetings and other educational audiences | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

By Jonathan Martin

 

"This post could be almost infinite: there is most certainly an extraordinary array of options for videos which expand educators’ understandings and inspire advances in 21st century learning. But curation is about choice and selection, and while I know I will leave out many, I thought I’d offer up a set of 15 of my favorites for your consideration for video screening at at back-to-school or beginning-of-the-year faculty meetings (and/or parent and board meetings).

 

"I’ve starred those that might also serve as useful and engaging videos to share with students at back to school or other assemblies.

 

"I am sure every reader will have their own opinions about the videos I’ve left off this list, and please: add them below using the comment box, or, post yourself your own set and share the link from this post to your own."

 

A wonderful list. You are sure to find something valuable here. -JL


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Highlight Web Pages, Share Your Notes | Annotary

Highlight Web Pages, Share Your Notes | Annotary | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This is a really useful tool to help develop your digital study skills. You can take notes and highlight specific parts of a web based text as you browse. You can sort your notes and links into collections and share these socially. Great tool.


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Vivian French:... why some children don't read

Vivian French:... why some  children don't read | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Vivian French: 'Often, the brightest and most imaginative contributors are those who struggle with decoding letters on a page.

I wouldn't describe myself as dyslexic, but I did muddle letters and misread words, especially when reading out loud, and in the 1950s/1960s, teachers weren't slow to comment. There's far more awareness these days, and some very impressive research - but I still hear that exasperated tone of voice. 'Surely even YOU can read that?' And it shocks me every time.

When I meet kids, I always ask, "What do talking, reading and writing have in common?" The answer, of course, is words. So then I ask, "So who's good at talking?" And they all are. So we practise our words (because practice makes perfect, and some words are far more interesting and evocative than others), and we write a story, and edit it, and illustrate it - and then we read it to the rest of the school. And then we put it in the library, having made sure that all the authors' names are on the cover. And guess what? My non-reading ducklings have suddenly become swans. They've achieved author status.

Obviously this is no quick fix, but I love these sessions because I can demonstrate the vivid imagination and sense of story that can go undiscovered in children who find reading problematic. It also, hopefully, gives them the confidence to go on trying. Confidence is a wonderful thing; believe you can do something, and eventually - it may not be easy - you might well get there. Believe you can't do it, and you never will.

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What does it mean to be ready for kindergarten? - Statesman Journal

What does it mean to be ready for kindergarten? - Statesman Journal | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
What does it mean to be ready for kindergarten?

When kindergarteners take their seats for the first time this year, some already will know how to read and others will have never picked up a book.

Some will sit quietly and follow directions while others will struggle to sit in their chairs. Those skills along with early math skills are the greatest predictors for later academic success.

Put another way, children who aren’t ready for kindergarten more likely will struggle in elementary school and beyond. In Salem-Keizer only 58 percent of kindergarteners finished the year on track in reading.

But what does it mean to be ready for kindergarten? Teachers, schools, parents and even the state lack a clear definition.

Parents get little guidance from preschools and schools on the specific skills needed. Kindergarten teachers spend little time evaluating who is ready because they must reach all students — whether or not they’re ready for kindergarten.

And Oregon does not have reliable information about how prepared students are for kindergarten. It stopped measuring kindergarten readiness in 2009 because of concerns about the reliability and validity of the survey.

This year, Oregon will set a benchmark for school readiness and pilot a test that tracks how many students walk-in-the-door ready for school.....

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The Reading Like a Historian Curriculum | Stanford History Education Group

The Reading Like a Historian Curriculum | Stanford History Education Group | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Reading Like a Historian curriculum engages students in historical inquiry. Each lesson revolves around a central historical question and features sets of primary documents modified for groups of students with diverse reading skills and abilities.

This curriculum teaches students how to investigate historical questions employing reading strategies such as sourcing, contextualizing, corroborating, and close reading. Instead of memorizing historical facts, students evaluate the trustworthiness of multiple perspectives on issues from King Philip's War to the Montgomery Bus Boycott, and make historical claims backed by documentary evidence.

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Once upon a time...‘The Storytelling Animal,’ by Jonathan Gottschall

Once upon a time...‘The Storytelling Animal,’ by Jonathan Gottschall | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Make-believe is more than fun and games, Jonathan Gottschall says; it helps us navigate life’s complex social problems.

 

As the philosopher Karl Popper wrote, simulation of the future allows “our hypotheses to die in our stead.” Clever animals don’t want to engage in the expensive and potentially fatal game of physically testing every action to discover its consequences. That’s what story is good for. The production and scrutiny of counterfactuals (colloquially known as “what ifs”) is an optimal way to test and refine one’s behavior.

But storytelling may run even deeper than that. Remember, in “Star Wars,” when Luke Skywalker precisely aims his proton torpedoes into the vent shaft of the Death Star? Of course you do. It’s memorable because it’s the climax of a grand story about good triumphing over evil.

Gottschall points out that for a story to work, it has to possess a particular morality. To capture and influence, it can’t be plagued with moral repugnance — involving, say, a sexual love story between a mother and her son, or a good guy who becomes crippled and a bad guy who profits handsomely. If the narrative doesn’t contain the suitable kind of virtue, brains don’t absorb it. The story torpedo misses the exposed brain vent. (There are exceptions, Gottschall allows, but they only prove the rule.)

This leads to the suggestion that story’s role is “intensely moralistic.” Stories serve the biological function of encouraging pro-social behavior. Across cultures, stories instruct a version of the following: If we are honest and play by the social rules, we reap the rewards of the protagonist; if we break the rules, we earn the punishment accorded to the bad guy. The theory is that this urge to produce and consume moralistic stories is hard-wired into us, and this helps bind society together. It’s a group-level adaptation. As such, stories are as important as genes. They’re not time wasters; they’re evolutionary innovations.

Gottschall highlights this social-­binding property in the stories nations tell about themselves. Full of inaccuracies, these are “mostly fiction, not history,” he writes. They accomplish the same evolutionary function as religion: defining groups, coordinating behavior and suppressing selfishness in favor of cooperation. Our national myths “tell us that not only are we the good guys,” Gottschall writes, “but we are the smartest, boldest, best guys that ever were.”

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Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and learning differences- The Ohio State University

Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race and learning differences- The Ohio State University | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The National Association for the Education of African American Children with Learning Disabilities (AACLD) will launch a series of nationwide trainings aimed at creating a movement for change in the African American community that results in an improved and socially just quality of education for African American children with learning differences. The inaugural symposium and training, Empowering Parents for African American Student Achievement, August 10-12, In Columbus at the OSU Blackwell Inn and Conference Center is co-sponsored by the Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity. Institute staff will participate in a public forum on Friday, August 10th, 5:30 to 7:30 at the King Lincoln Theatre and will lecture on implicit racial bias before the symposium’s invited participants. This convening compliments the Kirwan Institute’s ongoing and emerging research on barriers to educational opportunity that confront African Americans and other populations of color.

AACLD press release
See the presentation on implicit bias

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Dyslexia: The First 100 most commonly used words chart

Dyslexia: The First 100 most commonly used words chart | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

High frequency words are quite simply those words which occur most frequently in written material. For example, "and", "the", "as" and "it".

They are often words that have little meaning on their own, but they do contribute a great deal to the meaning of a sentence.

Some of the high frequency words can be sounded out using basic phonic rules, e.g. "it" is an easy word to read using phonics.

However, many of the high frequency words are not phonically regular and are therefore hard to read in the early stages.

These words are sometimes called tricky words, sight words or camera words.

In addition to being difficult to sound out, most of the high frequency words have a rather abstract meaning which is hard to explain to a child.

Below you can download our first 100 and second 100 most commonly used words chart for your classroom as a display or simply to put in front of your child when they are doing their homework to assist them with spelling.

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Fortune Academy Indianapolis school caters to students with dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity

Fortune Academy Indianapolis school caters to students with dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
An Indianapolis school that caters to students with "learning differences" such as dyslexia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has a new name, new location and a cash donation to help it grow.

Formerly, it was the Hutson School, located in the 7200 block of East 75th Street.

Now it's the Fortune Academy, and it inhabits a bigger, newer building at 5626 Lawton Loop East Drive -- a spot off 56th Street in Lawrence Township.

The move to the 15,693-square-foot facility is made possible by a $500,000 from Richard Fortune and the William L. Fortune Trustees Fund, said Janet George, the school's founder.

"We are excited as we further our mission to help children with learning differences become competent and confident life long learners," George said in a prepared statement.

The financial gift is intended to kick off an effort to raise $5 million for the school.

"The dream that Richard (Fortune) and I share of establishing a school for dyslexic students in Indiana," George said, "comes together on this day."

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What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition? - The Guardian

What can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition? - The Guardian | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The GuardianWhat can athletes with ADHD teach us about the condition?The GuardianExpelled from three schools and placed in a psychiatric unit aged 11 because his mother was unable to cope, McKenzie also served time in a young offenders' institute.

Athletes like Phelps and McKenzie do not, however, have special powers via their condition. Bilbow believes it is actually significantly harder for people with ADHD to become elite athletes. "Having ADHD doesn't mean you're going to be a great sportsperson," she says. "Your ADHD isn't going to get you there, it's hard work that will. ADHD is not a contributor towards success but equally it is not a barrier to success."

People with ADHD, which is a developmental disorder, may find they have poor problem-solving skills, and struggle with timekeeping, and organising and motivating themselves, explains Bilbow. This may suggest that adapting to the discipline demanded by athletic training is tough for those with ADHD and yet Bilbow believes many with the condition find sport gives them the kind of immediate rewards and sense of achievement they need to build confidence and resilience.

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Audiobooks Help Kids Learn

Audiobooks Help Kids Learn | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

(NAPSI)—With school back in session, there is good news for millions
of students who have difficulty reading because of dyslexia or other learning
disabilities. For these young people who struggle to understand the printed
word, there is a proven alternative: They can listen to their textbooks and
enjoy academic success.

Studies have shown that audiobooks are remarkably effective for many
students with reading-based disabilities. The benefits of auditory learning
include increased comprehension, better grades, higher confidence and
improved self-esteem. The leading resource for these students is Learning
Ally, a nonprofit organization that offers the world’s most advanced
library of audio textbooks for at-home and in-the-classroom reading.

Audiobook Apps Go Mainstream

Learning Ally offers instant access to more than 75,000 audio textbooks
and popular literature titles—nearly everything required for kindergarten
through high school and beyond. The audiobooks can be easily loaded to
devices that kids use in everyday life—like iPhone, iPad and iPod
touch, as well as their laptops.

 

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Back-to-School Kit for Parents of Students with LD

Back-to-School Kit for Parents of  Students with LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Learning the essential skills to become your child’s advocate and ensure your child receives an appropriate education does not require lots of money or even years of schooling. All it requires is learning five basic skills and consistently implementing them within the school community.

This e-book will cover the following topics:

• Building a Good Relationship with Your Child’s Teacher

• Essential Skills for Becoming Your Child’s Advocate

• Advocating for your School-Aged Child

• Making the Most of Your Parent-Teacher Conference

• Creating Great Expectations for an Effective Meeting” worksheet

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5 Must-Know Tips For Deploying iPads In Your Classroom | Edudemic

5 Must-Know Tips For Deploying iPads In Your Classroom | Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

If you're looking to deploy iPads in education, you may think that it's just a matter of expense and storage. Those things are big, but they're not the biggest problems you'll face.

 

"I  was chatting with an Edudemic reader this week who wanted to know a few tips and tricks about deploying iPads in his classroom this coming school year. I figured it might be helpful to share the results of this conversation with the rest of the Edudemic readers. After all, this site is all about sharing and learning together.

How many devices can use one Apple ID?
This is a question that pops up all the time. But no one seems to mention it! They just talk about how snazzy iCloud is or how easy it is to do XYZ.

But long story short, you can only have ten (10) devices per Apple ID. That means you’ll need 3 separate Apple IDs to deploy a classroom of up to 30 iPads. Want to use some iPads and some iPod Touches? Each counts as a device......."

 


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Talking Text - How to Make Your iPad Speak Selected Words & Phrases | iPad Academy

Talking Text - How to Make Your iPad Speak Selected Words & Phrases | iPad Academy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Here's how you can add the ability to have your iPad speak selected words and phrases.

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TY @NikPeachey for Transcribe - free online tool to transcribe interviews and audio clips

TY  @NikPeachey for Transcribe - free online tool to transcribe interviews and audio clips | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This is a useful tool to help you transcibe audio files / interviews. It opens a simple audio player with basic keyboard controls so that you can rewind as you type.


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Criteria for nurturing The Resilient Student »

The Academy - A High School run by the YMCA of Greater Toronto for Youth with Learning Disabilities & learning-style differences. 

 

The criteria are based on research by the Resilience Research Centre across many different cultures. “Both qualitative and quantitative studies have shown that facilitative environments that promote all seven of these aspects of children’s lives are likely to provide children who are disadvantaged with opportunities to experience resilience.

 

Schools that promote resilience provide opportunities for students to experience:

Nurturing Relationships

There are positive peer interactions in which every child has an opportunity to show others his or her talents.
There is active participation of parents and other caregivers in children’s learning, with channels for communication open between the child’s home and school.
Educators have opportunities to build strong relationships with students and provide mentorship to the most vulnerable.
Developing a Positive Identity

There are activities at which every child can succeed.
There are opportunities for children to show others their talents.
There are opportunities for children to feel unique and valued.
Power and Control

There are opportunities for students to influence their learning.
Students’ voices are heard in the design of extra-curricular activities.
Students are rewarded with success when they put in extra effort.
Social Justice

Students, regardless of ethno-racial background, gender, sexual orientation or ability,
are treated fairly while at school.
Curriculum, when possible, reflects the cultural and contextual diversity of students.
Access to Resources

Students feel safe at their school.
Extra curricular activities are affordable.
The school building is accessible.
Children’s basic needs for food and clothing are met, when possible.
Sense of Belonging

Children feel welcome at their school no matter what their background.
Children are given opportunities to contribute to their school and the well-being of others.
Children’s families are welcome at the school.
Culture

Children’s diverse cultures and traditions are celebrated at school.
Children are able to share at school aspects of their lives that are important to them.
Children have opportunities to tell stories about their past and the history of their families.

 

 

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Audiobooks Help Kids Learn - North American Press Syndicate

Audiobooks Help Kids Learn - North American Press Syndicate | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Audiobooks Help Kids LearnNorth American Press Syndicate(NAPSI)—With school back in session, there is good news for millions of students who have difficulty reading because of dyslexia or other learning disabilities.

Studies have shown that audiobooks are remarkably effective for many students with reading-based disabilities. The benefits of auditory learning include increased comprehension, better grades, higher confidence and improved self-esteem. The leading resource for these students is Learning Ally, a nonprofit organization that offers the world’s most advanced library of audio textbooks for at-home and in-the-classroom reading.

 

Learning Ally offers instant access to more than 75,000 audio textbooks and popular literature titles—nearly everything required for kindergarten through high school and beyond. The audiobooks can be easily loaded to devices that kids use in everyday life—like iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, as well as their laptops.

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The 'Get it Done' Personality: Academic Workplace 2012 - The Chronicle of Higher Education

The 'Get it Done' Personality: Academic Workplace 2012 - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Successful Academic
People who get things done and accomplish their goals often share these traits:

Resilience
The ability to recover from setbacks and cope effectively with stress

Grit
Perseverance and passion for challenging long-term goals

Conscientiousness
A tendency to be orderly, self-controlled, industrious, responsible, and willing to delay gratification

Creativity
The willingness to break with convention, challenge the status quo, and come up with new ideas

Focus
The ability to zero in on one thing at a time, tune out distractions, and avoid multitasking

Self regulation
An awareness of what matters and the discipline to avoid temptations and see a task through

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Enrollment at all-time high this year at Marburn Academy, For students with LD, Columbus, OH:

Enrollment at all-time high this year at Marburn Academy, For students with LD, Columbus, OH: | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"When classes resume on Aug. 22 at Marburn Academy, the Northland private school for young people with ADHD and other learning differences will have more than 170 students. "The most we've ever had," spokeswoman Nancy Paul said last week. This marks Marburn Academy's 31st year of operation. It is now located in a former elementary school building at 1860 Walden Drive. The growth is most apparent at Marburn Academy High School, where two modular classrooms and a commons area have been added from last year, school officials announced. Grades nine through 12 will start the academic year with close to 50 students, according to head of high school Mindy Bixel. "We've just steadily added students over the years," Bixel said, noting the high school had 18 students when she started as a teacher at Marburn nine years ago. Bixel has been head of high school for four years. "I think the word is out," she said. "I think our reputation is solid. The community now knows and trusts that we are actually the school we say we are. Academy officials frequently point out that, in spite of their learning difficulties, 100 percent of Marburn graduates are accepted into college. This comes at a steep price: slightly under $20,000 annually for lower and middle division students and closer to $21,000 at the high school level, by some accounts. However, Paul pointed out that many students attend on scholarships, including a new one this year called the Jon Peterson Special Needs Scholarship Program, named for former state Rep. Jon Peterson, a special needs advocate. The program allows students who have an individualized education plan, "which means they qualify for special education services from their home school," to transfer that funding to another school, according to Paul. "For example, a student diagnosed with ADHD or dyslexia receives extra funding from the state because they qualify for special education," Paul wrote in an email. "Now that extra funding would follow the student to a school like Marburn for help paying for tuition."

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Shameful Treatment of Children in Meridian, Miss.

Shameful Treatment of Children in Meridian, Miss. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In recent years, juvenile justice advocates, lawyers, policy-makers, and reformers have increasingly sought to raise awareness of the American phenomenon of the “school-to-prison pipeline.”

The term refers generally to the process in which substandard public schools fail to provide adequate support and resources for at-risk children and their families, resulting in high drop-out rates and ultimately leading to court-involvement, detention and incarceration.

More specifically, the term refers to the pattern in which students who have committed school-based wrongdoing — whether by pushing another child in the hallway, taking a pencil from a teacher’s desk, or disrupting class — are summarily arrested, charged with violating a criminal offense, and prosecuted in juvenile delinquency court. After a judge finds them delinquent, youth are then placed on probation and court-ordered to comply with a long series of conditions, typically including that they not be suspended (or not be suspended again) from school. In many jurisdictions when a juvenile on probation is suspended — even for a minor infraction at school — the consequences of the violation may include incarceration in a detention center.

Research has shown that youth who are disproportionately impacted by the school-to-prison pipeline are likely to be those who are already the most vulnerable: low-income students, children of color, English language learners, youth in foster care, students with disabilities (whether physical, psychological, or developmental), and homeless children. Often such students fall into more than one of these categories.

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Thank you for Several Short Sentences About Writing

Thank you  for Several Short Sentences About Writing | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
You can say smart, interesting, complicated things using short sentences.
How long is a good idea?
Does it become less good if it’s expressed in two sentences instead of one?

[…]

There’s nothing wrong with well-made, strongly constructed, purposeful long sentences.
But long sentences often tend to collapse or break down or become opaque or trip over their awkwardness.
They’re pasted together with false syntax.
And rely on words like ‘with’ and ‘as’ to lengthen the sentence.
They’re short on verbs, weak in syntactic vigor,
Full of floating, unattached phrases, often out of position.
And worse — the end of the sentence commonly forgets its beginning,
As if the sentence were a long, weary road to the wrong place.

[…]

Writing short sentences will help you write strong, balanced sentences of any length.
Strong, lengthy sentences are really just strong, short sentences joined in various ways.

 

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