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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
Curated by Lou Salza
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Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity--Choosing a School for a child with LD

Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity--Choosing a School for a child with LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity--Choosing a School http://t.co/EiFft7Fy...

 

There is not one perfect school environment that will suit every child with a reading problem and his family. The perfect school does not exist. The key to selecting a school is to determine which school’s profile best matches you and your child’s priorities at a particular point in time. And your priorities will change as your child goes through school.

The steps and questions below will help guide you through the process of selecting a school and will also give insight to the range of possible programs and services that a school could potentially offer to your child.

Ask as many people as you can about the school, particularly parents whose children are attending or are graduates of the school.

Visit the school, and ask yourself:

- What is the overall environment like?

- Do the children seem happy?

- Is there a sense of orderliness?

- Are the teachers and administrators open and friendly, and do they welcome questions?

Find out how the school views itself and what experience and policies it has regarding children with learning disabilities.

Observe several classes in session.

Learn about the students who attend the school.

Learn about the school’s academic curriculum and its reading program.

Find out about the school’s attitude toward providing accommodations, such as extra time on tests.

Learn about the faculty.

- How available are the faculty for students who require extra help?

- How long have the teachers typically been at the school?

- How are parents kept informed of their child’s progress?

Learn about what extracurricular activities are offered.

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Museum Director with Dyslexia: Tinkerer Bill Brown

Museum Director with Dyslexia: Tinkerer Bill Brown | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Apprentices at the Eli Whitney Museum learn to work with their hands."  - Bill Brown leads 'tinkering' workshops at the Eli Whitney Museum. Students ages 13-18 become apprentices where they receive a stipend and learn how to use master tools and conduct workshops for visitors. Experimentation is highly valued.

 

From a New York Times article on Brown, 

 

"Mr. Brown has long worked with youngsters on projects like the clockwork car. Powered by rubberbands, it demonstrates the storage and release of energy just as did the one that Leonardo devised when he studied clock springs.

 

"As I worked, I discovered kids who were excellent at making things but were struggling academically," he said.

 

In his students' learning habits, Mr. Brown recognized some of his own. Mr. Brown, 47 years old, who has a master's degree from Columbia University, said that he has awkward handwriting and struggles to synthesize material. The term "dyslexic," he said, probably fits him and many of his students. It may also have fit Leonardo, who wrote 6,000 pages of disorganized, often-misspelled journal notes.

 

Hands-On Learning Stressed

 

But Leonardo trained in a hands-on apprenticeship program and spent his life experimenting, an approach that Mr. Brown endorses.

 

"How do you help people realize how important the tradition of hands-on learning is? he asked. "Some people need to learn by touching and experimenting. What we've tried to do at the museum is find projects that will help people understand, learn by experiment and experience. We look for ways to demonstrate what this component of learning means."

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David Roche, Hotels.com: why you need a team with diverse weaknesses as well as strengths

David Roche, president of Hotels.com, on why you need a team with diverse weaknesses as well as diverse strengths. (http://t.co/HKxiX1Mp Think #dyslexia is all about weaknesses?

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NYT: Starving the Future: China & India building world’s future workers while we squabble about Ed reform!

NYT: Starving the Future: China & India building world’s future workers while we squabble about Ed reform! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
If you compare investments made in education by the United States with initiatives in China and India, Americans have reason to be afraid, very afraid.

This week, the Center for American Progress and the Center for the Next Generation released a report entitled “The Race That Really Matters: Comparing U.S., Chinese and Indian Investments in the Next Generation Workforce.” The findings were breathtaking:

• Half of U.S. children get no early childhood education, and we have no national strategy to increase enrollment.

• More than a quarter of U.S. children have a chronic health condition, such as obesity or asthma, threatening their capacity to learn.

• More than 22 percent of U.S. children lived in poverty in 2010, up from about 17 percent in 2007.

• More than half of U.S. postsecondary students drop out without receiving a degree.

Now compare that with the report’s findings on China. It estimates that “by 2030, China will have 200 million college graduates — more than the entire U.S. work force,” and points out that by 2020 China plans to:

• Enroll 40 million children in preschool, a 50 percent increase from today.

• Provide 70 percent of children in China with three years of preschool.

• Graduate 95 percent of Chinese youths through nine years of compulsory education (that’s 165 million students, more than the U.S. labor force).

• Ensure that no child drops out of school for financial reasons.

• More than double enrollment in higher education.

And the report also points out that “by 2017, India will graduate 20 million people from high school — or five times as many as in the United States.”

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Defeat dyslexia by catching it early - Parents Express - Montgomery News

Defeat dyslexia by catching it early - Parents Express - Montgomery News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
According to the National Institutes of Health, it’s estimated that 15 to 20 percent of the population, or one out of every five students, has a language-based learning disability. The most common of these disabilities is dyslexia, a neurological disorder that results in difficulties with language skills such as reading, writing, spelling or word pronunciation.

 

Contrary to popular belief, people with dyslexia do not always reverse letters or read words backwards, although letters may appear transposed or closer together for individuals with dyslexia. The disorder is considered a language-based learning disability because dyslexia can make it very difficult for a student to succeed academically in the typical school environment.

 

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) reports that approximately 38 percent of fourth grade students have “below basic” reading skills. These students are below the 40th percentile (performing below the other 60 percent of their peers) and are at greater than 50 percent chance of failing school achievement tests. Yet, to a large extent, about three quarters of children who show primary difficulties with basic reading skills early in reading development can be helped to overcome those difficulties.

“Early recognition of language-based learning problems is the key to effectively addressing these issues,” says Eugenie Flaherty, Ph.D., a clinical psychologist and past president of the PBIDA. Parents are often the first line of defense in recognizing any problems their child may be having with speech, pronunciation, recognizing letters and numbers, listening skills, and the like.

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TY @DyslexiaYale for Information on Dyslexia for Educators Yale Center 4 Dyslexia & Creativity

TY @DyslexiaYale for Information on Dyslexia for Educators Yale Center 4 Dyslexia & Creativity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

RT @DyslexiaYale: Transforming dyslexia from a liability to an asset. Children and adults with dyslexia are highly creative, and have many cognitive and emotional strengths, despite a weakness in decoding words. Successful dyslexics draw on their strengths to hit their targets in life

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Donation of Intel digital readers To Help Students With Dyslexia « United Independent ...

Donation  of Intel digital readers To Help Students With Dyslexia « United Independent ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Teachers with the District’s Dyslexia Program were recently trained to use new assistive technology devices which where graciously donated by Care Innovations, an Intel GE Company from Northern California. The donated items included 15 Intel Readers and 10 portable Capture Stations. These items will be used to help students with Dyslexia or hearing impairments. Pictured is Col. Santos Benavides Elementary teacher Elizabeth Guevara and Care Innovations Market Development Manager Lou Meier. Meier explained that he asked for the items donated to children in Laredo since he attended and graduated from high school here when his family was stationed at the former air force base. Meier is also Dyslexic and knows these devices will help students gain more confidence and independence with the printed word. The teachers will be utilizing this much needed equipment in the new upcoming school year which begins August 27, 2012.

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Free Parent Seminars at Marburn Academy 2012-13 | Dyslexia ...

Free Parent Seminars at Marburn Academy 2012-13 | Dyslexia ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

For more than 10 years, Marburn Academy has been offering free educational seminars to central Ohio parents of children who learn differently. These seminars offer scientifically based and state-of-the-art information about the best ways to teach bright children who learn differently throughout the school year.  Parents of children who struggle in school are invited to take advantage of this unique opportunity to learn information about teaching and learning which they might not find from any other source.

Seminars begin at 7:00 pm, and take place at the Academy.

September 11: “When Children Struggle with Reading: Is It Dyslexia?” September 24: “How a High School Designed Specifically for ADHD Students Can Make All the Difference” (This is a new topic) October 9: “Solving Reading Problems October 30: Understanding the Problems of ADHD Children” & “How to Teach Self-Management to Distractible, Impulsive Students” (2-Part Seminar) December 11: “How To Get High School to Work for ADHD Students (and How To Get ADHD Students to Work In High School) January 15, 2013: “Early Identification and Early Intervention for Reading Problems: Why Wait for Failure?” February 12: Correcting Persistent Spelling Errors: the Sources of and Solutions to the Problems” March 5: “Getting It Down on Paper: The Solutions to Student Writing Problems” April 9: “AHDH Students and the Role of Medication” May 9: “Solving Math Learning Problems” June 11: “Understanding the Problems of ADHD Children” and “How to Teach Self-Management to Distractible, Impulsive Students” (2-Part Seminar)

Marburn Academy offers these seminars free to parents of children with learning disabilities every year.  Feel free to invite friends and neighbors who could benefit from this information.

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Early anesthesia tied to language problems in kids - Fox News

Early anesthesia tied to language problems in kids - Fox News | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

kids who'd had anesthesia were about twice as likely to show signs of language disabilities and 70 percent more likely to have reasoning problems than the non-anesthesia group.
The researchers counted a "disability" as a score in the seventh percentile or lower on the standardized tests.
Studies in baby animals have shown that anesthesia can cause some brain cells to die and may affect the formation of circuits that other neurons use to communicate. But it's still not clear whether that also happens in kids' brains, researchers noted.
Based on the new study, it's difficult to say if the average difference in learning and reasoning between the two groups is one that a parent or teacher would notice in the average child, Warner said.
Still, he added that combined with other research linking multiple rounds of anesthesia with learning disabilities and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, the effect "may in fact be clinically significant."
What this study adds, Warner pointed out, is that even kids who underwent anesthesia only once when they were very young still had more trouble later on.
Nonetheless, "Our results do not mean that children should not have surgery if it's needed," Ing told Reuters Health.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/20/early-anesthesia-tied-to-language-problems-in-kids/#ixzz24KcU9SkK

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Early Childhood Anesthesia Carries Risks: language, cognitive function, motor skills and behavior.

Early Childhood Anesthesia Carries Risks: language, cognitive function, motor skills and behavior. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

American Academy of Pediatrics study of 2,608 children in Australia, 321 of whom were exposed to anesthesia before the age of 3 and 2,287 who were unexposed before age 3 was conducted to determine the association between exposure to anesthesia in children and outcomes in language, cognitive function, motor skills and behavior at age 10. The study, “Long-term Differences in Language and Cognitive Function After Childhood Exposure to Anesthesia,” in the September 2012 issue of Pediatrics (published online August 20) found that children exposed to anesthesia before age 3 have an increased risk for long-term deficits in receptive and expressive language and abstract reasoning at age 10. Even a single exposure was associated with increased risk. The authors noted that this study differs from others studies through the use of directly administered neuropsychological assessments. Past studies have relied on academic scores, standardized test results, medical records, and parent and teacher surveys. The assessments used in this study, however, may be more sensitive than those used in prior studies and as a result, able to detect subtle differences in specific neuropsychological domains.

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3 min news cast: Marburn Academy For Kids With ADHD, Dyslexia in central OH Boasts Record Enrollment ...

3 min news cast: Marburn Academy  For Kids With ADHD, Dyslexia in central OH Boasts Record Enrollment ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Marburn began the 2012 school year enrollment at an all-time high. While 170 students doesn't seem like a large number, it is to school that specializes in helping students with learning disabilities, specifically Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Dyslexia, students like Alexandra.

"Our teaching is built on a foundation of understanding what it is that's different about the way this child learns. Then our skill is having teachers trained in how to teach that way," explained Headmaster Earl Oremus.

Oremus said they are most excited about the growth in the high school grades. Nine years ago they had just 18 students enrolled. This year there are 50 students in grades 9-12. To accommodate the growth, the library was converted into classrooms and construction crews are working on adding modular units.

Marburn's success educating students with ADHD and dyslexia can be seen in their graduation rate. All students receive a diploma and go on to college.

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TY @PatBassett for Three creative geniuses explain why they hated school

TY @PatBassett for Three creative geniuses explain why they hated school | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Three creative geniuses explain why they hated formal education.

In Einstein’s own words:

“. . . I worked most of the time in the physical laboratory [at the Polytechnic Institute of Zürich], fascinated by the direct contact with experience. The balance of the time I used in the main in order to study at home the works of Kirchoff, Helmholtz, Hertz, etc. . . . In [physics], however, I soon learned to scent out that which was able to lead to fundamentals and to turn aside from everything else, from the multitude of things which clutter up the mind and divert it from the essential. The hitch in this was, of course, the fact that one had to cram all this stuff into one's mind for the examinations, whether one liked it or not. This coercion had such a deterring effect [upon me] that, after I had passed the final examination, I found the consideration of any scientific problems distasteful to me for an entire year.

It is, in fact, nothing short of a miracle that the modern methods of instruction have not yet entirely strangled the holy curiosity of inquiry; for this delicate little plant, aside from stimulation, stands mainly in need of freedom; without this it goes to wreck and ruin without fail. It is a very grave mistake to think that the enjoyment of seeing and searching can be promoted by means of coercion and a sense of duty..."

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In Rhode Island, Reinventing Summer School to Prevent Kids' Learning Loss | PBS NewsHour | Aug. 20, 2012

In Rhode Island, Reinventing Summer School to Prevent Kids' Learning Loss | PBS NewsHour | Aug. 20, 2012 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In Providence, R.I., the Summer Scholars Program has reinvented summer school by taking lower income students out of the classroom and putting them "into the field." John Merrow reports on how the new approach gets students to practice skills they struggled with during the past year and prevent additional learning loss for fall.

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New teachers' union president looks to take ownership of reform - The Denver Post

New teachers' union president looks to take ownership of reform - The Denver Post | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Amid continuing education upheaval and shifting definitions of everything from school finance to testing to teacher evaluation, Kerrie Dallman begins her term leading the state's largest teachers union not by working to resist change but to shape it.
"I actually believe that (unions) have to take ownership of reform," said Dallman, recently elected president of the Colorado Education Association. "We can't just say no. If we don't like something, we have to propose alternatives. We've got to put kids front and center."
Dallman brings a reputation for collaboration that strikes a welcome chord with reformers as well as an emphasis on bolstering investment in public education and professional standards that appeals to her membership.
Some call her a game-changer who could help the CEA negotiate the changing landscape with a leadership style that seeks to identify areas of collaboration — a direction Dallman says the organization already had been pursuing.
"I'm absolutely willing to engage in conversations around shared accountability," she said, "as long as it heads toward shared leadership."
With teacher relatives dating back generations to the days of the one-room schoolhouse, Dallman, 40,taught for 10 years at Pomona High School before heading the local bargaining unit in Jefferson County. She worked with administrators and the school board on tough budget-slashing decisions and also helped land a big federal grant to launch a peer-evaluation system for teachers.

Read more: New teachers' union president looks to take ownership of reform - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_21401840/new-teachers-union-president-looks-take-ownership-reform#ixzz24kzOqfyU
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

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short video loop: BBC Four - Growing Children, Dyslexia & child development

short video loop: BBC Four - Growing Children,  Dyslexia & child development | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Laverne Antrobus explores how child development is affected by dyslexia.

 

We live in a world of words. Almost everything we do involves reading - instructions, computers, phones, newspapers. It's a skill that is fundamental to functioning properly in today's society, and with the internet it has become ever more crucial. It has now been estimated that we see or hear over 100,000 words every day. Laverne meets Lettie, a ten-year-old girl who faces a daily battle with reading. Through an insightful interview, Laverne learns just how challenging this can make things for her. In a fascinating experiment, Laverne also uses computer animations to make her favourite book - Jane Eyre - difficult for her to read. Through this we begin to see the different way in which a dyslexic views the world.

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TY Elena Aguilar and edutopia.org for The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home

TY  Elena Aguilar and edutopia.org for The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

What shocked and saddened me were the parents who would say, "I don't think anyone has ever called me from school with anything positive about my child." I occasionally heard soft sobbing during these calls.

I'd first used this phone call thing as a strategy for managing behavior and building partnerships and it worked. However, after ten years of teaching I became a parent and my feelings shifted into some other universe. As a parent, I now can't think of anything more I want a teacher to do -- just recognize what my boy is doing well, when he's trying, when he's learning, when his behavior is shifting, and share those observations with me.

I know how many hours teachers work. And I also know that a phone call can take three minutes. If every teacher allocated 15 minutes a day to calling parents with good news, the impact could be tremendous. In the long list of priorities for teachers, communicating good news is usually not at the top. But try it -- just for a week -- try calling a few kid's parents (and maybe not just the challenging ones -- they all need and deserve these calls) and see what happens. The ripple effects for the kid, the class, and the teacher might be transformational.

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Thank You @CommonSenseNews for Cyberbullying Toolkit | Common Sense Media

Thank You @CommonSenseNews  for Cyberbullying Toolkit | Common Sense Media | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This free toolkit has the resources schools need to take an effective stand against cyberbullying.

Every day, you see how cyberbullying hurts students, disrupts classrooms, and impacts your school's culture. So how should you handle it? What are the right things to do and say? What can you do today that will help your students avoid this pitfall of our digital world?
We created this free toolkit to help you take on those questions and take an effective stand against cyberbullying. So start here. Use it now. Rely on it to start your year off right.

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TY @margbern for Seeking investors for Cleveland school kids, no money required: Margaret Bernstein

TY @margbern for Seeking investors for Cleveland school kids, no money required: Margaret Bernstein | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Now that a new school year has started, columnist Margaret Bernstein is looking for "investors" who are willing to share their time with local youngsters.

An investor isn't necessarily someone who gives money. From what I've seen, a person who gives his or her time is even more valuable to these youngsters.
The Cleveland school district has prepared a handout of seven ways that community members can help support students. Here they are:
1. Volunteer to help in the office, cafeteria, halls or classrooms. There are countless ways to volunteer in Cleveland schools, whether it's greeting children in the morning, serving lunch, shelving books in the library or organizing a robotics program. To learn more, contact Tracy Hill, executive director of Family and Community Engagement, 216-858-0117, tracy.hill@cmsdnet.net
2. Mentor youths. Cleveland schools chief Eric Gordon, who mentors nearly a dozen youths himself, says that caring adults are needed to work with kids and stay in their lives consistently. To reach Karen Thompson, the district's contact person for mentoring, call 216-348-3648 or email karen.h.thompson@cmsdnet.net
3. Tutor students. Love books? You can help instill a love of reading in a child, by tutoring. If you yearn to see more kids go to college, why not help a struggling teen pass the Ohio Graduation Test? Contact Tracy Hill to be referred to a number of tutoring opportunities: 216-858-0117, tracy.hill@cmsdnet.net
4. Offer internships in your company or organization. I've written it so many times -- "They can't be what they can't see." Cleveland youngsters come mostly from low-income households and haven't had much chance to peer inside the professional work world. Up-close exposure to career choices can be a turning point that inspires and motivates them to stay on the road to college. Contact Annette Darby, 216-348-3647, or email annette.darby@cmsdnet.net
5. Collect and donate school supplies and uniforms. Two years ago, budget cuts forced the Cleveland district to eliminate a program that once provided needy families with free uniforms. But the need remains. Some 1,200 families already have called to inquire about free uniforms and have been placed on a waiting list.

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THank you Ingrid Wickelgren for Minding Our Children’s Minds Scientific American Blog

THank you  Ingrid Wickelgren for Minding Our Children’s Minds  Scientific American Blog | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Child Mind Institute, founded just three years ago, is the only nonprofit organization in the U.S. dedicated solely to children’s mental health. Their mission includes diagnosing and finding better treatments for childhood psychiatric and learning disorders, gaining an improved understanding of healthy brain development, and helping families deal with issues ranging from school transitions to serious anxiety disorders and behavior problems.

Our kids need help. According to the Institute’s website, more than 15 million children in America have psychiatric disorders and at least half of them will never receive treatment. Lots of other children, no doubt, have psychological troubles that may fall short of a disorder but that parents do not know how to handle.

Allaying A Child’s Fears

One of the Institute’s areas of focus is childhood anxiety, which afflicts 13 percent of kids in its assorted forms, according to Ronald Steingard, a psychopharmacologist there. Some kids have severe separation anxiety, others panic or post-traumatic stress. In pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder, children have intrusive and repetitive thoughts—say, that something will happen to mom and dad—and attempt to stamp them out with an irrational ritual they perform compulsively. They might have to wash their hands six times before bedtime or perform a triple-tap on the front door before leaving the house. In some cases, the anxieties and behaviors become so numerous and pervasive that they essentially take over a child’s life.

 

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TY @iPodsibilities for CaptureNotes 2 Arrives With Security And Sharing Options, AppAdvice

TY @iPodsibilities for CaptureNotes 2 Arrives  With Security And Sharing Options, AppAdvice | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A great tool for school or work, G8R Software’s note-taking app, CaptureNotes, already offered audio recording, two text input methods, photo support, tagging, and more. With the release of v2.0 earlier today, users also have the ability to secure and easily share notes, along with improvements to previously implemented features.

Utilize default and custom flags within notebooks to tag pages and areas.
Just a few taps away, the new importing and sharing options make it easy to share your work with friends and co-workers, allow them to share with you, and otherwise get your notes transferred.

Located at the bottom-right of every binder and notebook is an action button. Not only does this menu encompass editing options, it now includes sharing commands. You can send binders or books via email or copy them to a Dropbox, Evernote, or the iTunes File Sharing bin.

If desired, you can also initiate an export through the action menu available near the right end of the notebook editing toolbar.

Importing files is very similar. Tap on the inbox icon nestled alongside the search, sort, and settings buttons at the right end of the binder and notebook toolbar to access the three services.

Listen to audio recordings and share them all or individually.

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Success Story: Anthony Hopkins | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan

Success Story: Anthony Hopkins | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Today's Success Story: Anthony Hopkins http://t.co/OlNrzoMa #dyslexia...

Sir Anthony Hopkins is considered to be one of the greatest living actors. But how was he able to win an Oscar, two Emmys, and the Cecil B. DeMille Award for Lifetime Achievement? Hopkins credits his dyslexia for his interest in acting.

Growing up, he preferred painting and playing the piano—-which he continues to do as an adult—-and didn’t enjoy his time in school.

“I was lousy in school,” Hopkins said in an interview. “I was antisocial and didn’t bother with the other kids… I didn’t know what I was doing there. That’s why I became an actor.”

His success spans from his Oscar-winning role as Hannibal Lecter in The Silence of the Lambs, the title role in The Mask of Zorro, his performance as President John Quincy Adams in Amistad, and much more.

To see Hopkins talk about his dyslexia, fast forward to the 14:40-minute mark in this hour-long interview.

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Fox News RPT: 5 questions to ask before starting your child on ADHD medication

Fox News RPT: 5 questions to ask before starting your child on ADHD medication | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Stimulant medications like Ritalin and Adderall are the most common type of medications used to treat ADHD and are up to 80 percent effective in helping to increase attention, decrease impulsivity, hyperactivity, and disruptive and aggressive behaviors. “It turns down the volume on those types of behaviors,” according to Dr. Susan Ashley, author of 1000 Best Tips for ADHD: Expert Answers and Bright Advice to Help You and Your Child.
Concerta, Ritalin LA, and Vyvanse are also stimulant medications but are taken once a day and last for up to 12 hours. Insomnia is the most common side effect, with children having trouble falling asleep and waking up in the morning, and feeling irritable.
Non-stimulant medications like Strattera take 4 to 6 weeks to start working and have to build up in the body so it can work longer than some of the stimulant options. The FDA issued a public health advisory in 2005 about the increased risk of suicidal thoughts within the first few months of using Strattera. And although the non-stimulants have fewer side effects, they are not as effective in some children.
Antidepressants, although not FDA-approved for ADHD, and antihypertensives, which are actually blood pressure medications, are also prescribed. Since there is not enough research about long term side effects of some of these medications, Ashley said it’s important to weigh the benefits and risks. “Maybe your kids can behave better but what’s the cost?”

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/15/5-questions-to-ask-before-starting-your-child-on-adhd-medication/?utm_source=LDOnLine.org&utm_medium=Headlines#ixzz24KbLbO4D

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San Jose USD Selects Lexia Reading to Meet Early Literacy Goals ... - Virtual-Strategy Magazine

San Jose USD Selects Lexia Reading to Meet Early Literacy Goals  ... - Virtual-Strategy Magazine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Lexia Reading’s distinctive and cost-effective technology offers a scalable, research-proven approach that provides educators norm-referenced measures that prioritize the students who are the most at-risk, and recommends teacher-led, direct skill instruction to address specific skill gaps. As students work independently on Lexia Reading, they receive explicit, systematic and structured practice on foundational reading skills. The fun, engaging software provides scaffolded learning, advancing students to higher levels as they demonstrate proficiency. Each of the age-appropriate, skill-specific activities in Lexia Reading conforms to federal guidelines and is aligned to the Common Core State Standards.

Read more at http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/08/21/san-jose-usd-selects-lexia-reading-meet-early-literacy-goals-all-elementary-schools-distr?page=0,0#4l4JPE7GtkRdbLC0.99

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The Marshall Memo - A Weekly Roundup of Important Ideas and Research in K-12 Education

Educational research newsletter based in Boston with subscribers nationwide. The Marshall Memo, published since 2003, is designed to keep principals, teachers, superintendents, and others very well-informed on current research and best practices in the field. Kim Marshall, drawing on his experience as a teacher, principal, central office administrator, consultant, and writer, lightens the load of busy educators by serving as their "designated reader."

To produce the Marshall Memo, Kim subscribes to 44 carefully-chosen publications and looks through scores of articles each week to select 5-10 that have the greatest potential to improve teaching, leadership, and learning. He then writes a brief summary of each article, provides e-links to full articles when available, highlights a few striking quotes, and e-mails the Memo to subscribers every Monday (with the exception of a one-week break at Christmas and a two-week mid-summer vacation).

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Dynaread Adds Public Dyslexia Library to help dyslexic students access library materials. |

Dynaread Adds  Public Dyslexia Library to help dyslexic students access library materials. | | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dyslexia program adds Text-to-Speech technology to help dyslexic students access library materials. |

 

 Dynaread Special Education Corporation offers an extensive online dyslexia library for free public use https://dynaread.com/service/. The Dynaread library offers articles and videos about dyslexia and related learning disabilities. The latest addition to the Dynaread library is the Ivona text-to-speech technology which allows people not only to read, but also to listen to all the articles in the online library.

Most of the entries in the library are in article format. This proved to be a problem for some of the parents and teacher of students using Dynaread. Dyslexia has a genetic link. Many parents of children who have dyslexia struggle with reading themselves. This makes it difficult for some of the them to accurately read articles. The solution? Implementing state-of-the-art Ivona iWebReader text-to-speech technology to the site. Now parents and teachers can listen to all the articles, making the Dynaread library much more accessible for those who struggle with reading.

Joy Dekkers, Dynaread COO:”It is so difficult to find quality dyslexia information on the web today. Websites offering good information on this topic are scarce. Many of the ones that do offer useful information are not always organized in an orderly and accessible fashion, making them hard to search.”

Dynaread offers science-based Learn-to-read remediation specifically designed for older struggling readers (age 7+). The Dynaread library forms an extension to the educational services Dynaread. Dynaread curriculum users kept coming back with dyslexia related questions.

 

Read more at

 

http://www.virtual-strategy.com/2012/08/20/dynaread-adds-exciting-new-feature-public-dyslexia-library#ItfbgURT7geVOxsv.99

 

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