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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning

9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

9 Characteristics Of 21st Century Learning

 

1. Learner-centered

2. Media-driven (this doesn’t have to mean digital media)

3. Personalized

4. Transfer-by-Design

5. Visibly Relevant

6. Data-Rich

7. Adaptable

8. Interdependent

9. Diverse

Read more:

http://www.teachthought.com/learning/9-characteristics-of-21st-century-learning/

 


Via Gust MEES, Carolyn D Cowen
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Learning and Teaching with iPads: Developing iPad learning ...

Learning and Teaching with iPads: Developing iPad learning ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Bounty Boulevard State School, had a very useful handout towards creating a 'Learning Workflow' available from their iPad portal. This handout provides a range of pathways for teachers to select Apps that can provide learning outcomes from understanding to reflection and then across that to move from less teacher centred workflows to more student centred learning.


Via Jenny Smith, Lee Webster, Tom Perran
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Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities, Inc. Elects Two New Board Members

Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities, Inc. Elects Two New Board Members | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities, Inc. (SKLD), the Westport, CT-based nonprofit organization, is pleased to announce the election of Marc L. Hoffman of Stamford, CT and Terry Ann Weil of Rye Brook, NY to its board of directors.

Smart Kids with LD is taking wonderful steps to de-stigmatize the LD community and help embrace their intelligence and creativity,” noted Terry Ann Weil. “I am honored to be a part of the organization’s ongoing discussion of issues affecting learning disabilities today, and I look forward to working on the board in providing expert resources for parents to inspire their children with learning disabilities to succeed.”
About Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities, Inc.:
Smart Kids with Learning Disabilities, Inc. is a Westport-based nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering the parents of children with learning disabilities (LD) and attention deficit disorders (ADHD) via its educational programs, website, blog and free e-newsletter at http://www.SmartKidswithLD.org. Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy is an Honorary Board member, and Henry Winkler, Golden Globe award-winning actor, director and author, serves as the organization’s Honorary Chairman.

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Crosland’s $1.1 million gift gives Dore Academy new name, better campus

Crosland’s $1.1 million gift gives Dore Academy new name, better campus | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Charlotte’s first academy for kids with learning disabilities kicked off its school year Monday at a site nearly quadruple in size, and with a new name above the door: The John Crosland School.

Crosland, a well-known Charlotte developer, donated $1.1 million to help the former Dore Academy buy the 58,000-square-foot office building, located near the intersection of Billy Graham Parkway and South Tryon Street.

As a result, enrollment at the K-12 Crosland School – the oldest accredited school of its type in the state – will grow from 90 to 250 students, as phased-in renovation is completed. The six-acre site replaces a 15,000-square-foot building on Providence Road that was overcrowded and prone to flooding.

Crosland, 83, grew up with dyslexia and said he made the gift in hopes of prompting greater support in the community for students with learning disabilities. Helping such students is a major focus of his charitable Crosland Foundation, based out of Foundation for the Carolinas.

 

“I wanted to do something that was long-lasting, a legacy,” said Crosland, who hopes his success in business will inspire the students.

“I would say don’t be bothered by what other people say about you. Even if they say you are dumb or whatever. You can stand there and take pride in what you do. If you try hard enough, you can overcome anything.”

 

Dore Academy was founded in 1978 by teacher Mary Dore, who had been a nun at Sacred Heart in Belmont. It was the first school in Charlotte created solely for children with learning disabilities or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It is now considered a national leader in the field, with 90 percent of graduating seniors going onto college programs, officials said.

Students from eight counties in the Carolinas are enrolled in the school, which has a 7-to-1-student teacher ratio and a full-time therapy dog on staff. It also has an eighth period tacked onto the end of the day, when teachers make themselves available in one room to answer all students’ homework questions.

Read more here: http://www.charlotteobserver.com/2012/08/28/3482876/11-million-gift-prompts-dore-academy.html#storylink=cpy

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What is Dyslexia: Infographic

What is Dyslexia: Infographic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
What is Dyslexia Infographic, facts (RT @apluslearningtx: What is Dyslexia Infographic - great information!
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Testing for Dyslexia | How to Test for Dyslexia - NCLD

Testing for Dyslexia | How to Test for Dyslexia - NCLD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
If you suspect that a child has dyslexia, an evaluation can lead to a better understanding of the problem. Test results are also used to determine state and local eligibility for special education services.

If you suspect that a child has dyslexia, an evaluation can lead to a better understanding of the problem and to recommendations for treatment. Test results are also used to determine state and local eligibility for special education services, as well as eligibility for support programs and services in colleges and universities. Ideally, evaluation results provide a basis for making instructional decisions and help determine which educational services and supports will be most effective.

At what age should people be tested for dyslexia?

People may be tested for dyslexia at any age. The tests and procedures used will vary according to the age of the person and the presenting problems. For example, testing with young children often looks at phonological processing, receptive and expressive language abilities, and the ability to make sound/symbol associations. When problems are found in these areas, targeted intervention can begin immediately. Of course, a diagnosis of dyslexia does not have to be made in order to offer early intervention in reading instruction.

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Common Signs of Dyslexia by Reading Rockets « Special 2 Me

Common Signs of Dyslexia by Reading Rockets « Special 2 Me | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Here's a great checklist for common warning signs of dyslexia. 

 

Common Signs of Dyslexia
By: International Dyslexia Association
Dyslexia is a language-based disability that affects both oral and written language. With help, children with dyslexia can become successful readers. Find out the warning signs for dyslexia that preschool and elementary school children might display.
Facts about dyslexia
Startling facts about dyslexia and related language-based learning disabilities:
Fifteen to twenty percent of the population has a reading disability.
Of students with specific learning disabilities who receive special education services, seventy to eighty percent have deficits in reading. Dyslexia is the most common cause of reading, writing and spelling difficulties.
If children who are dyslexic get effective phonological training in kindergarten and first grade, they will have significantly fewer problems in learning to read at grade level than do children who are not identified or helped until third grade.
Seventy four percent of the children who were poor readers in the third grade remained poor readers in the ninth grade. This means that they couldn’t read well when they became adults.
Individuals inherit the genetic links for dyslexia.
Dyslexia affects males and females nearly equally, and people from different ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds as well.

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Share Your Dyslexia Success Story * The Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity

Share Your Dyslexia Success Story * The Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Are you an "insert profession here" with dyslexia? Share your story. We want to hear from people in all professions.

A Dyslexia Declaration by Allison Hertog, Lawyer:

My early life was defined by teachers and other professionals who doubted my academic abilities, though now I believe I am one of the few lawyers in the country with a Master's Degree in special education. I was retained in second grade because I couldn't read and the elementary school psychologist told my parents I would never attend college.

By working very long hours, sacrificing my social life in high school and beyond, learning self-compensatory strategies, and never giving up, I earned some impressive degrees. I was not diagnosed with dyslexia until after I graduated from law school.

Today I am an attorney who represents students and adults with learning disabilities and ADHD. Every "win" for a student is a victory for me personally.

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Headstrong: Inside the Hidden World of Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder

Headstrong: Inside the Hidden World of Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Our first film provides an overview of dyslexia and attention deficit disorder while exploring the brave lives of diverse individuals persevering in a world not designed with them in mind. Click on the image below to watch the film in its entirety.

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Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity--Choosing a School for a child with LD

Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity--Choosing a School for a child with LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Yale Center For Dyslexia & Creativity--Choosing a School http://t.co/EiFft7Fy...

 

There is not one perfect school environment that will suit every child with a reading problem and his family. The perfect school does not exist. The key to selecting a school is to determine which school’s profile best matches you and your child’s priorities at a particular point in time. And your priorities will change as your child goes through school.

The steps and questions below will help guide you through the process of selecting a school and will also give insight to the range of possible programs and services that a school could potentially offer to your child.

Ask as many people as you can about the school, particularly parents whose children are attending or are graduates of the school.

Visit the school, and ask yourself:

- What is the overall environment like?

- Do the children seem happy?

- Is there a sense of orderliness?

- Are the teachers and administrators open and friendly, and do they welcome questions?

Find out how the school views itself and what experience and policies it has regarding children with learning disabilities.

Observe several classes in session.

Learn about the students who attend the school.

Learn about the school’s academic curriculum and its reading program.

Find out about the school’s attitude toward providing accommodations, such as extra time on tests.

Learn about the faculty.

- How available are the faculty for students who require extra help?

- How long have the teachers typically been at the school?

- How are parents kept informed of their child’s progress?

Learn about what extracurricular activities are offered.

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Museum Director with Dyslexia: Tinkerer Bill Brown

Museum Director with Dyslexia: Tinkerer Bill Brown | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Apprentices at the Eli Whitney Museum learn to work with their hands."  - Bill Brown leads 'tinkering' workshops at the Eli Whitney Museum. Students ages 13-18 become apprentices where they receive a stipend and learn how to use master tools and conduct workshops for visitors. Experimentation is highly valued.

 

From a New York Times article on Brown, 

 

"Mr. Brown has long worked with youngsters on projects like the clockwork car. Powered by rubberbands, it demonstrates the storage and release of energy just as did the one that Leonardo devised when he studied clock springs.

 

"As I worked, I discovered kids who were excellent at making things but were struggling academically," he said.

 

In his students' learning habits, Mr. Brown recognized some of his own. Mr. Brown, 47 years old, who has a master's degree from Columbia University, said that he has awkward handwriting and struggles to synthesize material. The term "dyslexic," he said, probably fits him and many of his students. It may also have fit Leonardo, who wrote 6,000 pages of disorganized, often-misspelled journal notes.

 

Hands-On Learning Stressed

 

But Leonardo trained in a hands-on apprenticeship program and spent his life experimenting, an approach that Mr. Brown endorses.

 

"How do you help people realize how important the tradition of hands-on learning is? he asked. "Some people need to learn by touching and experimenting. What we've tried to do at the museum is find projects that will help people understand, learn by experiment and experience. We look for ways to demonstrate what this component of learning means."


Via Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com
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David Roche, Hotels.com: why you need a team with diverse weaknesses as well as strengths

David Roche, president of Hotels.com, on why you need a team with diverse weaknesses as well as diverse strengths. (http://t.co/HKxiX1Mp Think #dyslexia is all about weaknesses?

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NYT: Starving the Future: China & India building world’s future workers while we squabble about Ed reform!

NYT: Starving the Future: China & India building world’s future workers while we squabble about Ed reform! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
If you compare investments made in education by the United States with initiatives in China and India, Americans have reason to be afraid, very afraid.

This week, the Center for American Progress and the Center for the Next Generation released a report entitled “The Race That Really Matters: Comparing U.S., Chinese and Indian Investments in the Next Generation Workforce.” The findings were breathtaking:

• Half of U.S. children get no early childhood education, and we have no national strategy to increase enrollment.

• More than a quarter of U.S. children have a chronic health condition, such as obesity or asthma, threatening their capacity to learn.

• More than 22 percent of U.S. children lived in poverty in 2010, up from about 17 percent in 2007.

• More than half of U.S. postsecondary students drop out without receiving a degree.

Now compare that with the report’s findings on China. It estimates that “by 2030, China will have 200 million college graduates — more than the entire U.S. work force,” and points out that by 2020 China plans to:

• Enroll 40 million children in preschool, a 50 percent increase from today.

• Provide 70 percent of children in China with three years of preschool.

• Graduate 95 percent of Chinese youths through nine years of compulsory education (that’s 165 million students, more than the U.S. labor force).

• Ensure that no child drops out of school for financial reasons.

• More than double enrollment in higher education.

And the report also points out that “by 2017, India will graduate 20 million people from high school — or five times as many as in the United States.”

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5 Star Dyslexic Chef Charlie Trotter Goes Back to School

5 Star Dyslexic Chef Charlie Trotter Goes Back to School | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"And whereas I used to think (dyslexia) was a disability, I've come to regard it as a strength. I read differently, and I do take longer to read something, but when I read something it is etched into my brain and I can quote long passages. Now I value the fact that I had to learn differently."- 5 Star Chef Charlie Trotter

 

Charlie Trotter has written 15 cookbooks, won 11 James Beard awards, and 2 awards for humanitarian work with Chicago area youth. Now Trotter is closing up his thriving restaurant to return to school (University of Chicago) to study philosophy and political theory.

 

Trotter's like many adults with dyslexia who have very broad interests and thrive when they pursue higher education later in life.

 

Read more.


Via Drs Fernette and Brock Eide at DyslexicAdvantage.com
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Thank you @TDOttawa for A+ Click - Mathematics Games for All Grades

Thank you @TDOttawa for  A+ Click - Mathematics Games for All Grades | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A+ Click is a free site full of online mathematics games for students at all grade levels. You can find games on A+ Click by selecting a grade level then selecting a topic. Alternatively, you select just a topic or just a grade level and browse through all of the games. Students do not need to register in order to play the games.


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Tom Perran
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Study indicates Children under three given anaesthesia suffer from learning disabilities

Study indicates Children  under three given anaesthesia  suffer from learning disabilities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

According to an Australian study, children under three who are given anaesthesia may have a higher risk of developing learning difficulties. The findings are based on an analysis conducted by the University of Western Australia (UWA) of the long-term effects of anaesthesia on children, based on 2,868 children born in the same region between 1989 and 1992. Britta Regli-von Ungern-Sternberg, professor of paediatric anaesthesia at the UWA School of Medicine and Pharmacology, said the study assessed the effects of early childhood exposure to anaesthesia in the first three years of life on long-term differences in language and cognitive function, the journal Paediatrics reports.
“We looked at 321 children from the Raine study who were exposed to anaesthesia for surgery and diagnostic testing before the age of three and found they were about twice as likely to develop a significant language impairment and three times more likely to have problems with abstract reasoning by the age of 10, when compared to children who were not exposed to anaesthesia and surgery,” Ungern-Sternberg said. Ungern-Sternberg said the study was not definitive and more work needed to be done to look at the long-term effects of anaesthesia on young children.
“The most important thing I want to emphasise is that these results do not mean that children should not have surgery if it is needed,” she was quoted as saying in a UWA statement.
“Parents should consult their surgeon to see if the procedure is necessary. Any concerns regarding anaesthesia and potential anaesthetic implications for their child should be discussed with their anaesthetist before surgery,” said Ungern-Sternberg.

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10 Tips for Going to College With ADHD | Child Mind Institute

10 Tips for Going to College With ADHD | Child Mind Institute | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

College is an exciting time! You're surrounded by new friends and new opportunities, and have more independence than ever before. However, college life also presents unique challenges to a student with ADHD. Managing classes, a social life, and extra curricular activities without day-to-day support from parents and a structured school schedule isn't easy. But there are plenty of things you can do to set yourself up for success. These top ten tips are a great place to start.

1. Go to class. Attendance counts even when teachers aren't hovering over you. Skipping classes not only leads lower grades, but it also makes professors less motivated to help when you need it…..

 

2. Be realistic: Don't sign up for an 8am class if you're not a morning person. Set yourself up for success by scheduling your classes at times of the day when you find it easiest to pay attention, and when you think you can get there on time. ….

3. Work first, play later. College campuses are filled with temptations that can distract from getting work done, and students with ADHD often have to work especially hard to get results. Schedule specific study periods in a quiet location, and stick to the plan. Reward yourself with fun, social activities. But train yourself to work first and play later. This will help minimize procrastination, and allow you to enjoy your social time without feeling anxious about falling behind in your classes.

4. Be proactive: Get support early, before a crisis develops. All campuses have resources available for students with ADHD to help you succeed. Contact Learning Support Services before you arrive on campus to find out what ADHD diagnosis documentation they require, and which services they offer. …

5. Use a calendar. Keeping track of class times, assignments, tests, and social activities isn't easy and doesn't happen automatically. Students with ADHD often have difficulty planning and remembering when assignments are due and tests are scheduled. ….An electronic calendar can be configured send you email or pop-up reminders a few days and hours before assignments and tests are due.

6. Think before you drink. It's no secret that alcohol use is widespread on many college campuses. While excessive drinking isn't healthy for anyone, research shows that students with ADHD experience more negative consequences as a result of their drinking than students without ADHD...

7. Join a club. With so many students on campus, it can be hard to find your niche. Join a club to help you meet people who like some of the same things you do...

8. Sleep! Find a sleep schedule that works for you and stick with it. Everyone needs sleep, but it may be even more important for students with ADHD……

9. Use your medication as prescribed. Continue to take your ADHD medication as prescribed by your doctor. Avoid skipping doses, and resist the temptation to misuse your medication in order to cram before a test or pull an all-nighter…..

10. Call, text, or email your parents. You may be living at college and well on your way to adulthood, but your parents can still be a great source of support…… Want to know more? We also have some tips for parents.

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Managing Adult ADD / ADHD's curator insight, December 8, 2014 9:09 PM

Excellent tips for ADD/ADHD college students.

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Top 10 Colleges for Budding Entrepreneurs - Huffington Post

Top 10 Colleges for Budding Entrepreneurs - Huffington Post | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Top 10 Colleges for Budding EntrepreneursHuffington Post:  In this weekend edition of the 2013 Unigo College Rankings we're showcasing the colleges across the country that, according to students, have built exemplary entrepreneurship programs and made resources for aspiring founders readily available.

 

The Top 10 Schools Where There's A Lemonade Stand in Every Dorm Room

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Dyslexia didn't stop mayor of Central Singapore District - AsiaOne

Dyslexia didn't stop mayor of Central Singapore District - AsiaOne | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Mr Tan, the Mayor of Central Singapore District, is dyslexic.

Dyslexia is a condition that makes it very difficult for children and adults to read, write and/or spell.

As a child, Mr Tan struggled in school because of his condition, and failed his O- and A-level English as a Second Language oral exams.

For instance, Mr Tan could not recognise the word "fire". He could not get the meaning nor could he say the word. So he failed his O-level English oral exam.

The same thing happened during his A-level English oral exam. He could not recognise the word "mosque" and failed the exam.

But far from being a dolt, Mr Tan, who is also Senior Parliamentary Secretary at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the Ministry of Community Development, Youth and Sports scraped through his English as a Second Language exam to enter the National University of Singapore (NUS) in 1979, where he read political science and Chinese Studies.

He graduated with a second class upper honours.

At NUS, an American who was an English language lecturer, pulled him aside after class one day and told him that he was dyslexic.

Said Mr Tan: "I didn't know what dyslexia was."

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7 Childhood Conditions You Can Still Correct

7 Childhood Conditions You Can Still Correct | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Fix that problem that's bugged you since childhood (RT @DyslexiaYale: Good Housekeeping article featuring Dr. Sally!

 

Reading Issues
Up to one in five Americans have dyslexia, making it challenging for them to get through a best seller — or even a menu. If they weren't diagnosed in school, many may incorrectly assume they're simply slow readers — "or even stupid," says Sally Shaywitz, M.D., codirector of the Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity. But dyslexia is neurological: Disruptions in key brain circuits affect the ability to retrieve or correctly order the basic sounds of language, explains Dr. Shaywitz. Telltale clues — beyond reading in a way that feels plodding and deliberate — include exceptionally poor spelling and knowing a word but being unable to utter it correctly.
Although the process is time- consuming, you can overcome dyslexia. It requires relearning the basics of reading, all the way back to learning how to sound out words. Group classes for adults typically meet at libraries, adult education centers, or offices of nonprofit literacy organizations several times a week for a year or longer. You can also have private lessons with a tutor. Two reading programs that Dr. Shaywitz recommends: the Wilson Reading System (wilsonlanguage.com) and Language (voyagerlearning.com/language).

Read more: How To Correct Childhood Conditions - Adult Treatment For Childhood Conditions - Good Housekeeping

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SpecialEdPost — kids with dyslexia

SpecialEdPost — kids with dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Almost all kids grumble about back-to-school, but for those who think differently, process differently and exhibit a different set of strengths than most, it’s a return to a stress-filled environment where they just don’t fit in at all. And they fail miserably, invisibly, their learning differences completely misunderstood by teachers, classmates, even family and friends.
These are the right-brained thinkers who are plenty smart, but for whom spelling, reading — and particularly reading aloud — writing legibly, taking notes in a lecture and copying from the board are never-ending struggles. They’re wrongly accused of not caring, of not working up to their potential, of not focusing on their work.
These kids may show great strength and aptitude in sports, music, art, and a whole array of other hands-on, project and performance-based activities—but increasingly in our schools today, only academics matter.

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Must-have iPad Apps for the Classroom | OLE Community Blog

Must-have iPad Apps for the Classroom | OLE Community Blog | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"There are lots of things to look for in a good classroom app. It needs to be engaging, fun, and user friendly. But above all, a good app pushes students to reach higher levels of thinking."


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New teachers' union president looks to take ownership of reform - The Denver Post

New teachers' union president looks to take ownership of reform - The Denver Post | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Amid continuing education upheaval and shifting definitions of everything from school finance to testing to teacher evaluation, Kerrie Dallman begins her term leading the state's largest teachers union not by working to resist change but to shape it.
"I actually believe that (unions) have to take ownership of reform," said Dallman, recently elected president of the Colorado Education Association. "We can't just say no. If we don't like something, we have to propose alternatives. We've got to put kids front and center."
Dallman brings a reputation for collaboration that strikes a welcome chord with reformers as well as an emphasis on bolstering investment in public education and professional standards that appeals to her membership.
Some call her a game-changer who could help the CEA negotiate the changing landscape with a leadership style that seeks to identify areas of collaboration — a direction Dallman says the organization already had been pursuing.
"I'm absolutely willing to engage in conversations around shared accountability," she said, "as long as it heads toward shared leadership."
With teacher relatives dating back generations to the days of the one-room schoolhouse, Dallman, 40,taught for 10 years at Pomona High School before heading the local bargaining unit in Jefferson County. She worked with administrators and the school board on tough budget-slashing decisions and also helped land a big federal grant to launch a peer-evaluation system for teachers.

Read more: New teachers' union president looks to take ownership of reform - The Denver Post http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_21401840/new-teachers-union-president-looks-take-ownership-reform#ixzz24kzOqfyU
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

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short video loop: BBC Four - Growing Children, Dyslexia & child development

short video loop: BBC Four - Growing Children,  Dyslexia & child development | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Laverne Antrobus explores how child development is affected by dyslexia.

 

We live in a world of words. Almost everything we do involves reading - instructions, computers, phones, newspapers. It's a skill that is fundamental to functioning properly in today's society, and with the internet it has become ever more crucial. It has now been estimated that we see or hear over 100,000 words every day. Laverne meets Lettie, a ten-year-old girl who faces a daily battle with reading. Through an insightful interview, Laverne learns just how challenging this can make things for her. In a fascinating experiment, Laverne also uses computer animations to make her favourite book - Jane Eyre - difficult for her to read. Through this we begin to see the different way in which a dyslexic views the world.

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TY Elena Aguilar and edutopia.org for The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home

TY  Elena Aguilar and edutopia.org for The Power of the Positive Phone Call Home | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

What shocked and saddened me were the parents who would say, "I don't think anyone has ever called me from school with anything positive about my child." I occasionally heard soft sobbing during these calls.

I'd first used this phone call thing as a strategy for managing behavior and building partnerships and it worked. However, after ten years of teaching I became a parent and my feelings shifted into some other universe. As a parent, I now can't think of anything more I want a teacher to do -- just recognize what my boy is doing well, when he's trying, when he's learning, when his behavior is shifting, and share those observations with me.

I know how many hours teachers work. And I also know that a phone call can take three minutes. If every teacher allocated 15 minutes a day to calling parents with good news, the impact could be tremendous. In the long list of priorities for teachers, communicating good news is usually not at the top. But try it -- just for a week -- try calling a few kid's parents (and maybe not just the challenging ones -- they all need and deserve these calls) and see what happens. The ripple effects for the kid, the class, and the teacher might be transformational.

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