Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Daggett: The institution entrusted with preparing citizens for the future is most resistant to innovation

Daggett:  The institution entrusted with preparing citizens for the future is most resistant to innovation | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....The institution entrusted with preparing citizens for a rapidly changing world has been one of the most resistant to innovation, a well-respected education expert said on Tuesday.

Bill Daggett told an audience of almost 1,000 people at the BancorpSouth Arena that America’s schools are still doing many of the same things they did nearly 100 years ago for no reason other than tradition...."

 

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Udacity, Amara Partner To Provide Free College Courses In Almost Any Language - Forbes

Udacity, Amara Partner To Provide Free College Courses In Almost Any Language - Forbes | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...Udacity,one of the world’s leading online education portals, yesterday announced a partnership with translation platform Amara to caption and translate more than 5,000 educational videos. The move allows Udacity to reach a global audience and to deepen its engagement with its rapidly growing user base.

“The online education space has emerged just as the production and consumption of online video has exploded,” said Nicholas Reville, CEO of Amara. “Video is the central medium that allows online education to flourish globally. But, video is harder and more expensive to translate and is not as searchable as text. That’s where Amara comes in....”

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Question Five: Executive Function — Landmark College Institute for Research and Teaching

Question Five: Executive Function — Landmark College Institute for Research and Teaching | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I am interested in learning more about developing and implementing effective classroom strategies to support students who have weak executive functions. More specifically, I would like to focus on two specific executive skills: task initiation and working memory. What interventions are recommended when a student (with a 504 Plan based on a diagnosis of ADHD) has good problem solving ability for non-verbal task that is brief and highly structured, but cannot handle a complex task?

How do I help a student who struggles with the ability to hold information in memory while performing complex tasks? Can you provide articles, books and research concerning this issue?

Response: You pose interesting questions about how to manage executive function difficulties in the classroom. We highly recommend 2 books by Lynn Meltzer: Executive Function: Theory to Practice and Promoting Executive Function in the Classroom, which can expand on some brief suggestions based on our own classroom experiences at Landmark College.

For a student who can't handle a complex task despite good general problem-solving ability, we help the student develop the ability to micro-unit a task, that is, to break it down into a series of smaller, manageable steps. The University of Minnesota Libraries has an interactive assignment calculator on their website that helps students do this for long-range assignments. We suggest students enter the steps onto a template that gives check-off boxes for each step, so they can indicate when each step is completed. The template includes a due-date or deadline for each step, with a Plan B box for a back-up date if the first deadline isn't met.

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5 Scholarships for Students With LD

5 Scholarships for Students With LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Money is available for prospective and current college students with issues such as dyslexia or ADHD.

The Rise Scholarship Foundation, is  a great place to start. Their website features a ton of articles and resources specifically for LD students, covering everything from navigating the Common Application for Undergraduate College Admission to keeping yourself engaged in classes.

And, true to its name, the foundation also gives out Rise Award Scholarships each year; in 2012, five students received $2,500 scholarship awards. If you're currently a high school senior, head over and apply before February 15 for your chance to win a 2013 scholarship.

Like the Rise Awards, the Anne Ford and Allegra Ford Thomas Scholarships are available to students across the nation who have a diagnosed learning disability. Presented by the National Center for Learning Disabilities, these are highly competitive awards, and well worth the time it will take to apply.

The Anne Ford Scholarship is a four-year renewable award, worth $2,500 each year; the Allegra Ford Thomas Scholarship is a newer program and provides a one-time $2,500 award to a student attending a two-year community college, technical or vocational school, or specialized program for LD students. (The NCLD website also lists a number of smaller and more specific programs on its site.)

 

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STEM changing the face and focus of education Rotary Club of Cleveland

STEM changing the face and focus of education  Rotary Club of Cleveland | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

".....The changing face and focus of education were experienced by the Rotary Club of Cleveland Tuesday.

Keri Randolph, director of learning for the Southeast Tennessee STEM Innovation Hub, led the Rotarians in an exercise to compare new learning styles with those most of the audience experienced in school.

“STEM (the acronym for science, technology, engineering and math) is about engaging kids in the learning process and getting them doing things hands-on,” Southeast Tennessee STEM Innovation Hub managing director Tracey Carisch said. “It’s also about a different way of learning, so that kids are learning how to think and learning how to problem solve and learning how to work with their fellow classmates on projects.”

This focus connects the classroom with real-life scenarios, giving the student a better sense of how they might use this information in the future. Carisch said they have also emphasized partnerships with local businesses to give students an opportunity to see science and math in action.

“What we want to see is kids engaged and teachers as facilitators,” Randolph said.

She pointed out that the new approach gets students engaged and allows them to talk in class. Carisch said this gives the students a sense of ownership.

Having a STEM focus goes beyond adding more classes to a class schedule. According to Carisch, such a focus is about incorporating these subjects into other areas of studies and connecting them.

Read more: Cleveland Daily Banner - STEM changing the face and focus of education..."

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HBO documentary: Rethinking dyslexia: a blessing in a very good disguise?

HBO documentary: Rethinking dyslexia: a blessing in a very good disguise? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

Rethinking dyslexia
By Janice D'Arcy
A new film makes the case that dyslexia may cause difficulties in reading, but it doesn’t cause difficulties in broader learning. In some cases, it goes so far as to suggest, the condition may even be a blessing in a very good, childhood-long disguise.
(iStockphoto)

“I really felt like people understand that dyslexia is a struggle, but they don’t understand the strengths, and that it isn’t an academic death sentence,” said James Redford, director of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia,” which debuts Monday on HBO.

Redford’s father is the famous Robert, but more importantly in this context, his son, Dylan, is dyslexic.

Redford intended “The Big Picture” to be the film he wished he had seen when Dylan was first diagnosed. “It’s hard to know what the future holds, there’s so much anxiety. ... Well, it turns out that in the end there is a way through it.”

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Brain Posts: Dyslexia Intervention Changes the Brain

Brain Posts: Dyslexia Intervention Changes the Brain | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Review of  "...recent research findings in reading disorder (dyslexia). These studies estimated the prevalence of dyslexia at approximately 10% of children with rates in boys nearly twice that of girls. Twin studies show a significant genetic contribution to the risk for dyslexia. Brain imaging studies show deficits in the structure and function of inferior parietal and supramarginal gray matter regions in those with dyslexia. Brain imaging is beginning to be used as a tool to direct and monitor the effect of psychological treatment. Real-time fMRI appears to be a promising approach to individualizing psychotherapy in PTSD and other brain disorders.

The important findings from this study included:

• Students demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in reading skills such as phonemic awareness, real and pseudo word reading and passage comprehension

• Brain gray matter volumes increased between 2 and 4 percent in the left fusiform/hippocampus, left precuneus, right hippocampus and right cerebellum regions after the intervention

• Improvement in reading skills and the increase in brain gray matter volumes persisted 8 weeks after the completion of the intervention The left fusiform brain region has been noted to show deficits in dyslexia in other cross-sectional brain imaging studies. The authors note this region is "commonly engaged in tasks involving object processing and object naming and may suggest that the dyslexic students are relying on this region to improve their processing of words".

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Latest Brain Research into Learning Disorders & Differences,& Gifted Dyslexia - DyslexicAdvantage.com

Latest Brain Research into Learning Disorders & Differences,& Gifted Dyslexia - DyslexicAdvantage.com | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

From Dr's Fernette and Brock Eide: "I thought I'd post our powerpoint presentation here if some of you wanted to discuss it, ask questions, etc.

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2 minute video featuring Richard Branson and Charles Schwab: The Big Picture Movie "You May Be Dyslexic"

"You May Be Dyslexic If..." © Dr. Sally Shaywitz, MD For more information, please visit us at www.thebigpicturemovie.com or dyslexia.yale.edu/. (RT @BigPictureMovie: Ever wonder if you have #dyslexia?
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Processing Math Breakdowns by walking thru problems:Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

Processing Math Breakdowns by walking thru problems:Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Have your students literally walk through Math problems.

Students with slower processing speeds or executive-function problems are often no different from their peers in math proficiency in first and second grade; but as they confront multistep computations in upper elementary school tests, their scores tumble because they lack the skills necessary to produce organized, efficient output. These students aren’t losing their earlier skill base. New tasks demand efficient processing in different domains. The mathematics problems they now encounter need organizational skills involving planning and sequencing, as well as skills like handwriting, copying text, note taking, and other outputs requiring accuracy and efficiency. These skills are often difficult for dyslexic students. Students who struggle with processing multistep problems can improve their accuracy by employing several strategies that involve “walking” and “talking” problems through.

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Twin Studies of Dyslexia:word reading skill, inattention, & hyperactivity-impulsivity are highly heritable.

Twin Studies of Dyslexia:word reading skill, inattention, & hyperactivity-impulsivity are highly heritable. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"......Hensler and colleagues from Florida State University conducted a study of 1024 first grade twin pairs from the Florida Twin Project on Reading. In this study, all subjects in the study completed the Stanford Achievement Test-Reading subtest (SAT-10) a validated measure of reading ability.

Analyses of reading performance were compared for overall reading ability and presence of reading disorder defined by performance at the 15%tile or lower on the SAT-10. These analyses found the following contributions:

For general reading ability, 53% of the performance was due to genetic factors, 25% was due to shared environmental factors while 21% was due to unshared environmental factors
The concordance rates for reading disorder in the monozygotic twins was .58 while for the dizygotic twins it was .32 indicating a significant genetic contribution to dyslexia

As noted in the post on the epidemiology of reading disorder, understanding the overlap between reading disorder and ADHD is important. A twin study from the Colorado Learning Disabilities Research Center is informative for understanding the overlap in these two developmental disorders.

Erik Willcutt along with colleagues from the University of Colorado, Regis University and Massachusetts General Hospital conducted a analysis of 457 twin pairs. They conducted a study starting from six cognitive domains:
phoneme awareness (ability to hear, identify and manipulate the smallest units of sound)
verbal reasoning
working memory
inhibitory control
processing speed
naming speed

They found in their analysis confirmation of previous findings that "measures of single-word reading, inattention, and hyperactivity-impulsivity are highly heritable."

Additionally, their twin analysis found that reading disorder was linked to independent deficits in phoneme awareness, verbal reasoning and working memory. ADHD was linked independently to deficits inhibitory control, while reading disorder and ADHD shared a common deficit in processing speed....."

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WSJ: The Journeying Dyslexic's Lament:Poet Philip Schultz on losing track of nearly everything on the road.

WSJ: The Journeying Dyslexic's Lament:Poet Philip Schultz on losing track of nearly everything on the road. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Poet Philip Schultz on losing track of nearly everything on the road.

"....I don't mention that I dread airport ticket machines and that I always attempt to find a human being, many of whom are capable of sympathy, to check me in. I don't mention that I don't process announcements of train stations and have to check at every stop to make sure I haven't missed mine. I avoid recounting the arguments I've had with my GPS, which apparently doesn't know its left from its right. Nor do I explain that my anxiety is so powerful I often can't leave my seat in the waiting area to go to a restroom because I fear that the moment I do my flight will board, even though I arrived an hour early. Traveling has always been hell for me, though now at least I know why.

I never feel more alone than when I'm traveling. Alone and, to some extent, helpless. The world expects a certain level of competence and can be merciless when this expectation is unmet.

But somehow I always manage to get to my destination, and on time. The ordeal is mitigated by the fact that my dyslexic son appears to have freed himself of much of this struggle. The self-knowledge that relieves Eli of my frenzied anxiety and self-doubt comes from his early diagnosis. Through educational support and accommodations, he has learned strategies to cope with the challenges of travel, as well as how to use technology for support.

I can't say how much I loved hearing about his getting lost in Paris on a school trip and using his smartphone to find the Best Western where he was staying. Yes, there were seven Best Westerns in the city, and he and his friends went to three before finding theirs, but he led the way—and at the age of 14! A marvel to me. My younger, nondyslexic son has been able navigate our supermarket's checkout scanners since he was 4, using my credit card and winking at me, knowing how astounded I am.

Enlarge Image

Philip Schultz

The future appears to be relenting a little for people like me, people for whom the world never previously seemed to be designed. My older son enjoys traveling, I believe. He went to China last year, and still hasn't stopped talking about the Great Wall and those terra-cotta warriors. My wife and I followed his every word on his travel blog with pride and admiration. Especially me."

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10 Questions Good Leaders Should Ask Themselves - Achieve: Vision, Action & Results

10 Questions Good Leaders Should Ask Themselves - Achieve: Vision, Action & Results | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

1. How do you personally define leadership?
Definitions of leadership abound. But if one of your subordinates asked what your definition is, would you have an answer?
2. Who are some of the leaders that you admire and why?
We can learn from other leaders, particularly from their failures. Are there leaders from business, politics, the arts, or sports who you admire, and why?
3. Who have been some of the influential leaders in your life?
While we can learn from contemporary and historical figures we have never met, the most influential leaders are often people we have known – from grandparents to neighbours to bosses – who have shaped our lives in some way. Who are they, and what did you learn from them about ethics, core values, and leadership style?
4. What are some of the defining leadership moments of your life?
Sometimes an incident or interaction transforms us or others in a memorable way. Those moments serve as a guiding compass, for us, and the people we lead. So it’s important to identify and understand those defining leadership moments.
5. What are you truly passionate about?
Passion, like negativity, is contagious. “Rather than trying to light a fire under people, great leaders light a fire within them. So are you clear on what it is that you are truly passionate about … and do you inspire passion in others?” he writes.
6. Why should anyone be led by you?
What leadership characteristics do you have that will allow people to be led by you, rather than simply have them accept you as their boss and dutifully follow instructions?
7. What are some of the key leadership lessons you would want to pass along to others?
A vital responsibility of leaders is to develop the next generation of leaders. What do you wish to share with others? At your retirement party, what would you want your leadership legacy to be?
8. Who are the people in your life who make you a better person – and a better leader?
Earlier, you considered leaders from your past who influenced you. Now focus on those people today – leaders, peers, subordinates, friends, relatives – who help you to be a better person and leader. Heed the advice of former U.S. president Dwight Eisenhower, who said, “Always try to associate yourself with and learn as much as you can from those who know more than you do, who do better than you, and who see more clearly than you.”
9. What are you reading?
It’s crucial to always be reading, and learning. Whether books, magazines, trade journals or blogs, you must be widely read since you never know where your best new idea might come from.
10. Are you a good follower?
To be a good leader, at times you must be a good follower


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, U-M Human Resource Development
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Leading Social Entrepreneurs Call for Transforming Education with New Technology 2012 EmTech Conference

Leading Social Entrepreneurs Call for Transforming Education with New Technology 2012 EmTech Conference | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
On Thursday, October 25, leading thinkers in education technology innovation convened at the MIT Media Lab for EmTech, for two-day energetic exchange about how to shape the future of learning for students in the U.S.

"...Tablets for kids in Africa. Massive online open college courses available free to millions worldwide. American public schools offering programs to teach kids how to design educational games. On Thursday, October 25, leading thinkers in education technology innovation convened at the MIT Media Lab for EmTech, for two-day energetic exchange about these new developments and how to shape the future of learning for students in the U.S. and around the world.
EmTech is the MIT Technology Review's annual conference focused on emerging technologies and their impact. It brings together key innovators from the technology, engineering, health, science, and management communities to discuss innovations that are changing the face of business and driving the global economy. For the first time this year, MTR Chief Editor Jason Pontin hosted a panel on education featuring MIT Media Lab chairman and One Laptop Per Child founder Nicholas Negroponte; World Wide Workshop founder and Globaloria creator Dr. Idit Harel Caperton; Institute of Play managing director Brian Waniewski; and edX President and MIT Electrical Engineering and Computer Science professor Anant Agarwal...."

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Documentary takes new look at dyslexia: David Weigand Winston-Salem Journal

Documentary takes new look at dyslexia: David Weigand Winston-Salem Journal | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When he was in fourth or fifth grade, Dylan was assigned to read Dr. Seuss’ “The Cat in the Hat” to a group of kindergarten students. Dylan’s approach was to memorize the book to help him during the actual reading.

"...Despite the fact that dyslexia accounts for between 80 and 90 percent of all learning disabilities, said Yale’s Sally Shaywitz, it remains deeply misunderstood and weighed down by inaccurate mythology. Dyslexics do not “see words backward,” for example. Another kid once said to Dylan that he had had dyslexia for a while, too, but it went away. In sixth grade, Skye Lucas, who is dyslexic, was called “mentally retarded” by another student. If she had been younger, she said in Redford’s film, she would have been upset, but, wise beyond her years, she knows full well how much dyslexia is misunderstood.
Skye’s father, Tyler, a successful orthopedic surgeon, always found reading a tremendous challenge, but his determination got him into medical school and into a flourishing career. He didn’t realize until Skye was diagnosed with dyslexia that, of course, he has suffered with it all his life.
Although society’s understanding of what dyslexia is and isn’t has increased in recent years, it’s alarming that schools are often ill equipped to accommodate students with dyslexia. When one parent finally learned that her daughter’s stomach aches and other maladies were not so much “performance anxiety,” as her school had told her, but were prompted by her dyslexia, she was relieved and thought the school would feel similarly. Instead, the school officials insisted the girl be placed elsewhere immediately.
Dyslexia, Shaywitz said poetically, is a paradox: It is “an island of a weakness … surrounded by a sea of strengths.”
Dyslexics like Virgin Airlines’ Sir Richard Branson, California Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, investment broker Charles Schwab and attorney David Boies share qualities of persistence, creativity, thinking outside the box ‑ their own sea of strengths. After he’d already built the Virgin empire, Branson had to have the difference between “net” and “gross” explained to him by comparing the amounts of fish caught in a “net” versus the number of fish available in the sea. Today he believes dyslexia has led him to simplify his company’s advertising language, which has benefited his company..."

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Branford, CT woman featured in HBO documentary on dyslexia

Branford, CT  woman featured in HBO documentary on dyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...llison Schwartz of Branford grew up thinking there was something wrong with her because she had trouble reading.

She even remembers crying herself to sleep when, in fourth grade, she overheard an expert tell her mother that she would never be any good at math, geography or language.

“It wasn’t until I was 23 that I got the diagnosis of dyslexia,” she said. “Suddenly everything made sense. That’s when I was told, ‘You’re really smart but this is how your brain processes information. This is why certain things are difficult for you.’ It was such a relief to hear someone say what it was, to use the word ‘dyslexia.’”

Now Schwartz joins with three other young people telling their stories of struggle and triumph in a new HBO documentary, “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia,” that will air at 7 p.m. Monday...."

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James Middleton: How I battled dyslexia to read at Kate and Prince William's wedding... - Daily Mail

James Middleton: How I battled dyslexia to read at Kate and Prince William's wedding... - Daily Mail | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When James Middleton walked down the aisle of Westminster Abbey to deliver his reading at the marriage of his sister – to a global television audience of two billion – he had more reason than most to be gripped by anxiety.
He knew the eyes of the world were upon him but it was his own struggle with reading that was his biggest concern.
His reading turned out to be a masterclass in measured oratory, made all the more remarkable by the fact that James still struggles to read because of his dyslexia – a broad term to describe a common learning difficulty.

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2224101/James-Middleton-How-I-battled-crucifying-dyslexia-read-Kate-Williams-wedding.html#ixzz2AdggvZEa
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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Kentucky pushes for school innovation using charter-style freedom

Kentucky pushes for school innovation using charter-style freedom | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....In some Kentucky public schools, a raft of state regulations, along with institutional lethargy, can stymie educators from trying innovative ideas to boost achievement, educators say.

But what if schools were freed to teach students in radical new ways — allowing them, for example, to shift the school day, learn outside the classroom and trade in written tests for presentations that demonstrate learning.

That’s the idea behind the Kentucky Board of Education’s “Districts of Innovation,” a program created by the General Assembly that, starting next year, will give an initial group of 10 or more public schools freedom to experiment without having to meet every state rule.

“These will look and feel more like charter schools,” said David Cook, director of innovation at the Kentucky Department of Education, who spoke to educators in Louisville on Friday about the program. “The idea is to allow them to innovate without the fear of being slapped for it.”

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'Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia' Documentary by James Redford, 7 p.m. Monday on HBO.

'Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia' Documentary by James Redford, 7 p.m. Monday on HBO. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it


When he was in fourth or fifth grade, Dylan was assigned to read Dr. Seuss' "The Cat in the Hat" to a group of kindergarten students. Dylan's approach to the task was to memorize the book to help him during the actual reading. But even with the book memorized, he made so many mistakes, the younger students had to correct him repeatedly along the way.
Dylan, the son of filmmaker James Redford, is dyslexic. Not very long into his father's fascinating, straightforward and revealing documentary, "The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia," you may very well find yourself wishing you had a kid as smart as Dylan Redford. The film airs Monday on HBO with encore broadcasts.
Despite the fact that dyslexia accounts for between 80 and 90 percent of all learning disabilities, says Yale's Dr. Sally Shaywitz, it remains deeply misunderstood and weighed down by inaccurate mythology. Dyslexics do not "see words backward," for example. Another kid once said to Dylan that he had had dyslexia for a while, too, but it went away. In sixth grade, Skye Lucas, who is dyslexic, was called "mentally retarded" by another student.

Read more: http://www.sfgate.com/tv/article/Big-Picture-Rethinking-Dyslexia-review-3981570.php#ixzz2APIpIJff

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Dyslexia Guidance for Managers and Employers: Dyslexia in the workplace | Think ...

Dyslexia Guidance for Managers and Employers: Dyslexia in the workplace | Think ... | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new book published by the British Dyslexia Association aims to shed light on this 'learning difference' and helps managers & employers on their road to supporting dyslexic employees. 

Dyslexia does not discriminate. It affects people of all ‘abilities’ – and there are countless literate dyslexics across all professions; lawyers, teachers, engineers, police, nurses …….this learning difference is everywhere.

In my experience very few employers understand the obligations placed on them by the Disability Discrimination Act (now replaced by the Equality Act) and that aside I think most people would agree – getting the best out of all employees makes good business sense.

This latest publication on the subject is commended by Dr Sylvia Moody a professional much respected in this field and I believe is a ‘must read’ for managers.

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Educational Leadership:Students Who Challenge Us:Practices to Engage All Learners

Educational Leadership:Students Who Challenge Us:Practices to Engage All Learners | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"......For as long as he could remember, Jimmy had a hard time in school. For him, school was one disappointment after another. Although initial standardized test scores showed Jimmy had an aptitude for learning, his daily performance indicated otherwise. At school, Jimmy felt a whittling down and chipping away at his identity and self-esteem. He attended school, but he had given up. At-risk students like Jimmy come in all shapes and forms. They tend not to fit in at school. Some are withdrawn and quiet, and others are disruptive or rebellious. Academically, they often perform below their expected grade level (National Mentoring Partnership, 2007). Many are truant and come from homes with high mobility rates and lower socioeconomic status; some must work more than 20 hours each week to support their families (Hammond, Linton, Smink, & Drew, 2007). How can teachers support students like Jimmy? One clue is to examine the practices of teachers who are effective with such students. One of the authors, James Riegert (2009), interviewed, observed, and conducted a focus group with six high school teachers who were nominated by multiple colleagues and peers across 26 school districts in a midwestern U.S. city for their success in working with at-risk students. The teaching experience of these six teachers ranged from 10 to 35 years. Although these six teachers worked exclusively with at-risk students, mostly in alternative settings, they had much to say that could apply in a regular classroom. To create classrooms that engage all learners, these six teachers focused on five interrelated practices:

 

1. Create Bonds

 

A major part of teaching is building relationships. Teachers must intentionally establish and maintain bonds with students as students progress through their coursework. But at-risk students often are not easy to bond with. Many withdraw from their teachers or challenge teacher rules and expectations…...

 

2. Persevere Through Difficulties

 

When creating relationships with students, these teachers don't take no for an answer. They repeatedly and persistently exert the energy and strength necessary to create and sustain challenging relationships. They are determined, and they persevere. As Becky explained, "I do everything in my power to stay patient and hang on to kids……."

 

3. Differentiate and Be Flexible

 

As educators, we chose teaching because of our passion for students and our subject area. The challenge is to connect the curriculum with students' interests and passions. One way to begin is by selecting instructional strategies that respond to students' needs rather than beginning with strategies that are tied to curriculum (Tomlinson & Javius, 2012)……

 

4. Make Curriculum Relevant

 

The work of a teacher is to provide students with clear objectives, guidelines, and feedback and to support their next steps in growth (Tomlinson & Jarvis, 2012). If that task is not complex enough, students, especially at-risk students, will want to understand how the material they are learning is relevant to their lives.....

 

5. Start Fresh Daily

 

All of these teachers provided their students with fresh starts every day. "Teachers need to look at these kids knowing that every day is a new day. You cannot … harbor anger toward them," said Bohdan. Donna stressed the need to suspend judgment and not jump to hasty conclusions: "You cannot be judgmental. You just cannot do it, because if you are, they won't take any chances with you...."

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The power, legacy of Steven Spielberg’s dyslexia in 60 Minutes: ‘I own my fear'

The power, legacy of Steven Spielberg’s dyslexia in 60 Minutes: ‘I own my fear' | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Steven Spielberg’s 60 Minutes interview on Sunday night:

"....After having made more than 25 films, winning two Oscars, two Golden Globes and three DGA Awards, Steven Spielberg is in a time of his life when he can turn from “outward action” to “inner action”; a shift in perspective which is one of the strengths of dyslexia and reflected in Steven Spielberg’s newest movie Lincoln.

Unlike his previous movies, the movie Lincoln, coming in November, is not an action movie but a movie “about process and politics”. Daniel Day-Lewis, who plays Lincoln, depicts the last four months of Lincoln’s life and his fight to abolish slavery.

“Lesley Stahl: There's not a lot of action. There's no Spielberg special effects.
Steven Spielberg: Right.
Lesley Stahl: It's a movie about process and politics. Have you ever done a movie even remotely--
Steven Spielberg: Never. Like this?
Lesley Stahl: Not even close.
Steven Spielberg: Never. No. I knew I could do the action in my sleep at this point in my career. In my life, the action doesn't hold any-- it doesn't attract me anymore.”
Similar to his interview about dyslexia Steven Spielberg talks about his dyslexia: Tips, insights, and solutions, - what appears to attract Steven Spielberg at this time in his life (not unlike Lincoln) is to leave a legacy..."

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Yale Dyslexia Experts Sally & Bennet Saywitz, speak at Delaware Valley Friends School

Yale Dyslexia Experts Sally & Bennet Saywitz, speak at Delaware Valley Friends School | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Two professors from Yale will speak at Delaware Valley Friends School.

Delaware Valley Friends School, in coordination with the International Dyslexia Association, will host two experts from Yale University for a discussion Thursday night.

Sally and Bennett Shaywitz, a husband-and-wife professors who also co-direct of the Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity. Thursday night, they will present a program titled, Dyslexia: Translating Science into Policy and Practice – It’s Time!.

The discussion will take place at Delaware Valley Friends School Thursday night at 7 p.m. The school is located at 19 E. Central Avenue in Paoli. Registration to attend the event is $25.

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Epidemiology of Reading Disorder (Dyslexia) & co-occurrence with ADHD. | Brain Posts

Epidemiology of Reading Disorder (Dyslexia) & co-occurrence with ADHD. | Brain Posts | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...One of the key issues in reading disorder is the co-occurrence or comorbidity of reading disorder with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Rates of RD are elevated in ADHD emphasizing the need for comprehensive neuropsychological assessment of children and adults with ADHD.

Yoshimasu and colleagues published a free access study of the prevalence rates for RD in a population-based cohort of children and adolescents in Rochester, Minnesota.

The researchers in this study used analysis of multiple school and academic records to estimate the prevalence of reading disorder in a cohort of 5718 children. Reading disability was assessed by comparing measures of IQ and reading achievement. Using several validated formulas, reading disability can be assigned with reading achievement falls significant below what would be expected based on individual intelligence. Additionally, ADHD was estimated in the cohort using assessment of DSM-IV criteria, ADHD questionnaire results and evidence by records of a clinical diagnosis of ADHD.

The key findings from this epidemiologic study included:
508 cases of reading disability were indentified in the cohort
379 cases of ADHD were identified and as expected 75% of ADHD cases occurred in boys
For those without ADHD, the estimated rates for reading disorder were 14.5% for boys and 7.7% for girls
Rates for reading disorder were markedly elevated for children with ADHD with estimates of the prevalence of RD in boys with ADHD at 51.0% and for girls with ADHD 46.7%

A key finding from the study is the effect of a diagnosis of ADHD in girls on rates of RD. Female gender is a relative protective factor for RD, but once the diagnosis of ADHD is present, this protective effect is lost....

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One father’s voice: Dealing with guilt and making the right chioces for your child

One father’s voice: Dealing with guilt and making the right chioces for your child | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
As Dyslexia Awareness Week is ending, the dialog about much needed changes for dyslexics is continuing.

How did you deal with your daughter’s dyslexia?

“After comparing my daughter’s work and my own when I was in school, I was certain that I also had dyslexia. I am self-educated, I read a lot, and I established my own business. I know they say that dyslexia makes reading difficult but based on my own experience, I know you can learn it, you just learn it differently. I did. When you have your own innovative business, reading and math are the two most important things. Since I was able to do it, I knew my daughter could do the same.”

How did you deal with your daughter’s school?

“I took my daughter out of public school and enrolled her in a private school that focused on the abilities of my daughter and not the disabilities. The school used the 'Help' method to teach dyslexic children to read and she had an assistant who spent time with her to enjoy reading. The school really focused on the abilities of dyslexia. Knowing that my daughter was in the best school possible was important for me so that I could focus on my own business.”

Not every parent can afford a private school, what alternative would you have chosen?

“That’s a tough question. I know I didn’t want her to be in special education because I’d be afraid of what it would have done to her self-esteem. Now that I know about the “Help” method of how to teach dyslexic kids to read, I would have hired a tutor to help her with her school work and communicate with her teachers as much as possible to give her extra time or whatever would be possible in the regular classroom. To support her creativity, I would have looked for any kind of activities that were available after school that she could join; any activity that didn’t focus on reading, writing, and math, but about being active and creative.”

What does your daughter do now?

“Well, she is about to graduate from the same school with a GPA of 3.8. She is a fluent reader, loves creative writing, and hopes to continue working with horses professionally. She is considering becoming a veterinarian but isn’t sure yet. She still doesn’t like math but graduating with a B in Math, I am not going to complain. She has her passion, is innovative, self-confident, respectful, and happy. What more can parents wish for?”

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