Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
Curated by Lou Salza
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Everything You Need to Know About the New SAT By ERIC HOOVER @nytimes @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

Everything You Need to Know About the New SAT By ERIC HOOVER @nytimes @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The changes get mixed reviews. Some testing experts who’ve studied the College Board’s sample questions describe them as more relevant and less gimmicky. Others foresee problems, especially for those who struggle with reading.
Lou Salza's insight:

What is wrong with the SAT--old or new? The same thing that is wrong with our focus on "sorting" in education rather than teaching and learning diverse learners.  Perhaps the reason the SAT has successfully predicted first-year college performance is that first-year college performance is so much like an SAT! Hundreds of freshman in survey courses at large universities where they are judged by a multiple choice mid term and a final--3hours of  high stakes testing similar to the SAT. For our students in the Republic of ADHD and Dyslexia, the new SAT just like the old one, will be a poor indicator of their capability, motivation, obtainment or aspirations.  Maybe we could all 'Just say no!?'--Lou

 

Excerpts:

"Even the math section will require more reading, with fewer questions based on equations and more word problems. 

 

…..How should students prepare? By reading often and diving into various kinds of texts, especially nonfiction, tutors say. That’s more a long-term strategy than a quick test-prep trick. Habitual reading can also help on the writing section, which will demand prolonged concentration. To answer questions about grammar, punctuation and usage, students will have to wade through extended passages relating to history, humanities and science.

….What’s true of the writing section is true of the new SAT in general: There’s much more to read. “The most fundamental change is that there are many, many more words,” said Aaron Golumbfskie, education director for PrepMatters. “If you don’t read well and happily, this test isn’t going to be your friend.”

 

 

Even the math section will require more reading, with fewer questions based on equations and more word problems. 

 

…..How should students prepare? By reading often and diving into various kinds of texts, especially nonfiction, tutors say. That’s more a long-term strategy than a quick test-prep trick. Habitual reading can also help on the writing section, which will demand prolonged concentration. To answer questions about grammar, punctuation and usage, students will have to wade through extended passages relating to history, humanities and science.

….What’s true of the writing section is true of the new SAT in general: There’s much more to read. “The most fundamental change is that there are many, many more words,” said Aaron Golumbfskie, education director for PrepMatters. “If you don’t read well and happily, this test isn’t going to be your friend.”

 

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One of my favs: @brainpicker 9 learnings from 9 years of Brain Pickings @lawrenceschool

One of my favs: @brainpicker 9 learnings from 9 years of Brain Pickings @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
On October 23, 2006, Brain Pickings was born as an email to my seven colleagues at one of the four jobs I held while paying my way through college. Over the years that followed, the short weekly email became a tiny website updated every Friday, which became a tiny daily publication, which slowly grew, until this homegrown labor of love somehow ended up in the Library of Congress digital archive of "materials of historical importance" and the seven original recipients somehow became several million readers. How and why this happened continues to mystify and humble me as I go on doing what I have always done: reading, thinking, and writing about enduring ideas that glean some semblance of insight – however small, however esoteric – into what it means to live a meaningful life.
Lou Salza's insight:

I have been a subscriber since October 2011.  Love the site, the insights and the deep dive Maria Popova takes every week!-Lou

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How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture @Kschwart @lawrenceschool @CarollDweck

How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture  @Kschwart  @lawrenceschool @CarollDweck | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
He’s clear that his job is to teach science, but it’s also his job to nurture the individuals he teaches.

The kids at Arroyo often have a lot of challenges outside the classroom. Many of these students will be the first in their families to go to college. Clark knows this and it makes him even more passionate about growth mindset.

“Redefining smart as something that’s more effort-based than genetics-based has opened the door for kids,” Clark said. “They don’t feel like they’re behind other kids any longer because they feel that their future is in their own hands, and if they just work through their problems they’re going to be OK.”
Lou Salza's insight:

Fostering and sustaining a growth mindset in classrooms and the school is perhaps the most important single thing we can do as educators to promote the success our students.--Lou

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Go Ahead, Say Dyslexia! By Kyle Redford @lawrenceschool

Go Ahead, Say Dyslexia! By Kyle Redford @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When I was going through school, dyslexia was often a whispered word. With few known effective interventions and general confusion surrounding the condition, many potentially capable classmates were left alone to struggle in regular classes or ushered into the school basement to learn alongside students with a wide variety of learning disabilities, including the developmentally disabled. In those days, many schools treated dyslexia as if it were an academic death sentence. The condition imposed a heavy burden of school shame on anyone who wore the distinction. It is no wonder that students avoided being associated with the term and were willing to do almost anything to avoid activities that might betray their dyslexia-related struggles (almost anything academic).
Lou Salza's insight:

The USDOE is now directing schools to use the term dyslexia on IEPs after years of 'dyslexia denial'--Lou

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USDOE to Schools: Use Terms “Dyslexia, Dysgraphia & Dyscalculia” in IEPs! @Ryan_Masa @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

USDOE to Schools: Use Terms “Dyslexia, Dysgraphia & Dyscalculia” in IEPs! @Ryan_Masa @cdcowen @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It’s always been OK to say “dyslexia,” “dysgraphia” or “dyscalculia” in an IEP. But now the U.S. Department of Education (ED) is encouraging states and school systems nationwide to use these terms when appropriate. They’re also reminding them that there’s nothing in the law that says they shouldn’t use those words.

On October 23, the Office of Special Education Programs (OSEP) clarified the use of these terms in a Dear Colleague letter. That letter encourages states to remind their districts to use the terms in IEPs, at IEP meetings and in evaluations used in determining eligibility for special education services.

The letter also encourages:

States and districts “to consider situations where it would be appropriate to use the terms to address the child’s unique, identified needs”
States “to review their policies, procedures, and practices to ensure that they do not prohibit the use of the terms”
States to remind their districts of “the importance of addressing the unique educational needs of children with specific learning disabilities resulting from dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia”
Lou Salza's insight:

At long last!--Lou

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Play! Laugh! Learn! Grow! Lawrence School 2015 Fall Tailgate - YouTube @lawrenceschool

Lawrence School students, families and friends gathered at the Upper School on Sept. 10 for our annual Fall Tailgate. See how we are re-imagining school at www.lawrenceschool.org or call 440.526.0717.
Lou Salza's insight:

Schools can create and sustain a community where students, parents, faculty and staff gather together to play games, and sports, enjoy one another and the great outdoors.  A community where students find their 'place' creates and sustains a sense of well-being and confidence. A sense of well-being and confidence creates  the willingness to try new things, accept academic and social challenges--and these experiences drive learning, achievement and self-esteem.  Reimagine school!--Lou

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Dyslexia hasn't slowed Auburn RB Peyton Barber, on or off field - @lawrenceschool

Dyslexia hasn't slowed Auburn RB Peyton Barber, on or off field - @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Most know Barber from his recent success on the football field. Auburn's starting running back is fourth in the SEC in rushing, averaging 112 yards per game, and he scored five touchdowns in his last game. What you might not know is he suffers from dyslexia and ADHD. The latter was discovered at a young age, but he wasn't diagnosed with the former until he got to Auburn.

What is it exactly? Before you can know what dyslexia is, you must understand what it is not. It does not mean Barber can’t read. It does not mean that he’s unintelligent or lazy. It simply means that it takes a little longer for him to process things.

"If you were to talk to me, it would take me a second to really get the information," Barber said. "If I read, it’s not the fact that I can’t read. I’ll think I’m reading everything correctly, and then somebody will tell me I skipped a line or that I have to repeat that part."

The learning disability made life difficult growing up. Barber had to take special education classes in high school. At one point, he was told he wouldn’t be able to go to a Division I college, that he would have to settle for junior college instead. But he switched schools, found a home at Milton High School, and by his senior year, he was out of the special ed classes.

Not long after that, he was enrolled at Auburn.
Lou Salza's insight:

Rush the line of scrimmage!! that's what we have to do when we are born in the Republic of Dyslexia and ADHD and we find ourselves trying to move the ball in school! --Lou

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Assistive technology is changing special ed by Philip Murphy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ATDyslexia

Assistive technology is changing special ed by Philip Murphy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ATDyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The number of devices is growing to the point that students have a wider variety of innovative electronics at their fingertips. A 2013 Arizona Republic story highlighted an 11-year-old’s use of assistive technology to compensate for her struggles holding a pencil. Her use of a $200 word processor called The Forte provided the freedom to keep up with a fast-paced sixth grade class.

Jan Cawthorne, director of special education for Mesa Public Schools in Arizona is well-versed in assistive technology and how far it’s come. She cited a coolness factor to these devices since the iPad came out that wasn’t there before.

“Assistive technology used to mean big, clunky things that kids were embarrassed to be seen with,” Cawthorne said. “Now, it’s a cool thing to use.”
Lou Salza's insight:

The fact that these devices are mobile, relatively inexpensive, and ubiquitous, changes the rate at which AT can be adopted in our schools. As they become more and more accepted, we can expect that AT will begin to change General Education  as well as Special Education. Here's hoping! --Lou

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Does Pre-K Make Any Difference? by David L. Kirp @nytimes @lawrenceschool

Does Pre-K Make Any Difference? by David L. Kirp  @nytimes @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new study suggests the gains are ephemeral. But let’s check the fine print.Have the claims made for early education been overblown? Not necessarily. Consider what’s happening in Boston. A randomized study showed that prekindergartners there gained between four and seven months’ progress in reading and math, and those gains persisted: 27 percent more of Boston’s preschool children scored “proficient” or better on the state’s rigorous third-grade exams.What’s the difference between Boston and Tennessee? In a word, quality. “Tennessee doesn’t have a coherent vision,” Dale Farran, a Vanderbilt professor and the Tennessee study’s co-author, told me. “Left to their own devices, each teacher is inventing pre-K on her own.”


Boston’s teachers are taught to understand the complexities of child development, and receive abundant coaching from knowledgeable veterans. The curriculum is calculated to get children’s minds in gear. “Too often, children sit in a circle and the adult does all the talking,” says Jason Sachs, who runs Boston’s public preschools. “Here, children take much more of an active role. They learn about the concept of length by comparing the shadows they cast when lying on the ground. They learn about measurement by producing a guide to making light blue. They collaborate in figuring out how to make their city a better place — an assignment merging reading, math, art and science — and get to present their work at City Hall.”…..“There are no easy routes to preschool success,” says W. Steven Barnett, a Rutgers economist and the director of the National Institute for Early Education Research. “It takes time, money and a relentless focus on quality — but it has been done.”Even as more 4-year-olds attend pre-K, many states are delivering it on the cheap. While Boston spends $10,000 for each preschooler, in 2014 the average expenditure, nationwide, was $4,125. That’s $1,000 less (adjusted for inflation) than the 2002 average — and a third of what’s spent for each K-12 student. In education, as in much of life, you get what you pay for.

 

Lou Salza's insight:

This Op-Ed makes a critical distinction between Pre-School program  featuring child engagement, use of human development research and mentors for early childhood teachers. For students who fail to make the transition from learning to read to reading to learn, this early intervention is especially important.

Check out Earl Oremus speaking at Lawrence School on the importance of early identification and intervention: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rz_ntLfrZxk

---Lou

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rz_ntLfrZxk

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Dyslexia and the Reading Brain @MaryanneWolf_ @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers @DaveFlink

Dyslexia and the Reading Brain @MaryanneWolf_ @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers @DaveFlink | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In “Proust and the Squid,” Wolf writes that if she were given five minutes with all teachers and parents everywhere, she’d want them most to know that “learning to read, like Red Sox baseball, is a wonderful thing that can go wrong for any number of reasons.” For students accused of being stubborn or not working to their potential, often neither is true: Children with dyslexia need immediate and intensive intervention to connect the pieces of the reading circuit.

The Science of Reading and Dyslexia

The act of reading itself is anything but natural. Human brains weren’t designed to read: There is no “reading center” of the brain, and there are no “reading genes.” Instead, in order to read, each brain must fashion new circuits between parts originally designed to do other things, like retrieving the names for objects. These new circuits must not only combine many processes from different areas of the brain to form a specialized circuit just for reading — in order to become a fluent reader, the circuit also needs to run lightning-fast, nearly automatic.
Lou Salza's insight:

Dyslexia is not a "learning disability". I am a citizen of David Flink's 'Dyslexia Republic'. I assure you I can learn! 

My favorite description of dyslexia is given here by Dr. Maryanne Wolf:---Lou

 

"Dyslexia, Wolf said, is the result of a brain that’s organized in a different way. In many children, this is because the right hemisphere tries to muscle the strengths of the left, specifically at tasks that are the domain of the left, like many language functions. When the reading circuit is being dominated by the right hemisphere, it takes longer for the information that goes to both hemispheres to get together."

 

 

Dyslexia, Wolf said, is the result of a brain that’s organized in a different way. In many children, this is because the right hemisphere tries to muscle the strengths of the left, specifically at tasks that are the domain of the left, like many language functions. When the reading circuit is being dominated by the right hemisphere, it takes longer for the information that goes to both hemispheres to get together.

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@jeffreybenson61 Emotionally Healthy Kids:How Not To Be a Mountain Troll @lawrenceschool

@jeffreybenson61 Emotionally Healthy Kids:How Not To Be a Mountain Troll @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Harry Potter books introduced readers to mountain trolls, huge and volatile creatures who roam the landscape, unable to reason with humans, solving all conflicts by knocking people unconscious with their heavy clubs. You don't want to run into a mountain troll.
It's helpful to remember that image when we consider how our most emotionally precarious students have often experienced adults. For many of these students, adults have been like mountain trolls: unpredictable, dangerous, powerful creatures that walk through their lives, seemingly incapable of listening and unable to recognize human emotions. Many emotionally fragile students who withdraw or act out in class may be victims of pervasive and often undocumented abuse. They've lived through such abuse year after year, leading to what Bessel van der Kolk (2014) labels developmental trauma disorder, cloaked in various diagnoses. No wonder these students don't trust us. They enter the arena of the classroom truly guarded.By Jeffery Benson


Lou Salza's insight:

Perfect metaphor for our most vulnerable children--useful, sage advice that is straight from the heart--offered by a sage!--Lou

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Predicting Dyslexia — Before Children Learn to Read @CarrollSchool @cdcowen @bnpowers @lawrenceschool

Predicting Dyslexia — Before Children Learn to Read @CarrollSchool @cdcowen @bnpowers @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
But collaborations currently underway between neuroscientists at MIT and Children’s Hospital may mark a fundamental shift in addressing dyslexia, and might someday eliminate the anguish of repeated failure. In preliminary findings, researchers report that brain measures taken in kindergartners — even before the kids can read — can “significantly” improve predictions of how well, or poorly, the children can master reading later on.
Lou Salza's insight:

Lawrence School in OH has initiated a small kindergarten of 4 students this fall.  We would welcome thoughts about what ought to be included in the program from the point of view of the researchers in Massachusetts--Lou

 

Excerpts:

"...At the Carroll School in Lincoln, Mass., which specializes in language-based learning disabilities, eighth-graders Katelyn, Lily, Sarah and Aysha (their parents asked that their last names not be used) no longer have to keep their dyslexia a secret. But they recently told me about some of the strategies they used to employ — like pretending they couldn’t see words without their glasses, or asking friends to read for them.

Here’s what they said:

“Oh, I used to just like mumble over the word or say it really quietly — and pretend like I said it.”

“I would be chased down the hallway… it was mostly just one boy, and he’d be yelling at me, chasing me, and the teachers would just watch, and he’s like ‘You can’t read, like you should know how to read by now, you’re in seventh grade,’ but so, yeah, it was not very fun to go to school.”

“I remember that I used to pretend to be sick every day…and it was like most people say, ‘Oh, eighth grade, seventh grade, sixth grade, best years of your life.’ Not really. Like for some — a lot of dyslexic kids…it was torture.”

Dr. Eric Falke, director of cognitive interventions and research at the Carroll School, says children with dyslexia typically find alternate strategies to develop language skills. “Workarounds,” he says. “What they do is they use a lot of their intelligence to compensate for little bottlenecks, little quirky things about the way their brain processes information.”

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 24, 2015 7:10 PM

This research into early markings of dyslexia is much needed, and might result in some effective and early help. -Lon

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@ATDyslexia 3 Desktop Literacy Tools Dyslexics Should Know About @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @ryan_masa

@ATDyslexia 3 Desktop Literacy Tools Dyslexics Should Know About @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Currently, dyslexic students can use their smartphones and tablets for a variety of academic work that involves reading and writing. There are apps for text-to-speech, dictation, word-prediction, optical character recognition, and advanced spell checking, to name just a few. However, more robust desktop software can still play a key role in the education of students that have difficulty with various language skills.

The following desktop programs have unique features that make them stand out from the many AT choices that are available today. They may not be as well known as other tools, but each can certainly contribute to the growing independence of students with dyslexia.
Lou Salza's insight:

'There's an app for that' and those of us who continue to wrestle with pencils, pens, and print! Jamie Martin offers information, experience and wisdom--Lou

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Who Helps Kids With Dyslexia Gain Reading Fluency? @lawrenceschool TY! @HKorbey

Who Helps Kids With Dyslexia Gain Reading Fluency? @lawrenceschool TY! @HKorbey | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It was only after she took a doctorate-level class called “High-Incidence Disabilities” with Dr. Nancy Mather at the University of Arizona did the lightbulb switch on. She learned that reading disabilities affect anywhere from 5 percent to 20 percent of students. Youman recalled discussing dyslexia in the class and feeling perplexed. “I stopped and said, ‘Wait, this happens a lot? Then why don’t we know about it?’ ”

The 7- and 8-year-olds who couldn’t even write the alphabet, she discovered, might have been helped if someone had stepped in to find out why—was it a deficiency with roots in the child’s environment, or lack of phoneme awareness? Or a comprehension deficiency, or some combination of any or all of them? Youman quickly decided that this is where she could be useful — to go inside schools and help find the kids who were struggling, figure out what was happening and try to intervene.

Armed with a Ph.D. in school psychology and currently diagnosing disabilities at a middle school in the San Francisco Unified School District, Youman now understands more clearly why she didn’t know then how to help her struggling students: First, she was never trained how to specifically help students become better readers; and second, there are multiple bureaucratic barriers standing in the way of students getting help. For example, until very recently, California law provided 13 disability categories that could qualify students for services through an Individualized Education Plan (IEP), but dyslexia wasn’t one of them.
Lou Salza's insight:

Dyslexia is no longer a "nom de Guerre"!? Progress noted!--Lou

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USDOE: "It's Fine For Districts to'Say Dyslexia'", TY! @DecodingDyslexiaUSA @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

USDOE: "It's Fine For Districts to'Say Dyslexia'", TY! @DecodingDyslexiaUSA @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
States and districts should not feel reluctant to use the terms dyslexia, dyscalculia, or dysgraphia when describing a particular child's learning needs, says guidance released Friday by the U.S. Department of Education. 

For those outside of the special education field, such guidance may seem obvious. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act names dyslexia as an example of a disability that would be included in the broader term "specific learning disabilities." About 40 percent of the students who are covered under the IDEA are classified as having a specific learning disability.

 But the department's action was prompted by concerted efforts from parent groups such as Decoding Dyslexia and other advocacy organizations, which have recently rallied around the Twitter hashtag, #saydyslexia. Those groups say that the specific needs of students with dyslexia are too often glossed over, because educators don't know enough about the disorder, or that they lump dyslexic students along with struggling learners who may have different challenges.

A recent article by KQED explored this dynamic. A family in Nashville talked about how the district first told them—erroneously—that the state didn't recognize dyslexia as a learning disorder. Once corrected, the district then wanted to put the student through specialized reading instruction, instead of creating an individualized education program with dyslexia-specific interventions.

Advocates have been pushing states to define dyslexia in state law (Iowa is one recent example) and have also made efforts to have dyslexia placed in the draft of a bill to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, though that effort has thus far been unsuccessful. October has been designated advocates as a month of awareness for learning disabilities, dyslexia, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, so the department's action was right on time. 
Lou Salza's insight:

Nice shout out to the folks at Decoding Dyslexia who have moved the needle for all of us over the past several years! Kudos to DD!

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@raf_ideas @nytimes Can You Get Smarter? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers

@raf_ideas @nytimes Can You Get Smarter? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

All subjects took a benchmark cognitive test, a kind of modified I.Q. test, at the beginning and at the end of the study. Although improvements were observed in every cognitive task that was practiced, there was no evidence that brain training made people smarter. Scores on the benchmark test, for which subjects could not train, did not significantly increase at the end of the study.

There was, however a glimmer of hope for subjects age 60 and above. (Full disclosure: I’m 59, so I’ve got skin in this game.) Unlike the younger participants, older subjects showed a significant improvement in verbal reasoning, one of the components of the benchmark test, after just six weeks of brain training, so the older subjects continued in a follow-up study for a full 12 months.

Results of this follow-up study, soon to be published in a peer-reviewed journal, generally show that continued brain training helps older subjects maintain the improvement in verbal reasoning seen in the earlier study. This is good news because it suggests that brain exercise might delay some of the effects of aging on the brain.

Lou Salza's insight:

So what's good for the old goose and gander is not good for the goslings!

 

Let's  shut down the 'brain gyms' at school ( or at least the outlandish claims about increasing cognition) and make sure children get exercise ( recess) and the very best in evidence-based curriculum to drive literacy and numeracy achievement, engagement in real problem solving ( projects), community ( extra-curricular activities). These  ultimately drive success beyond school. 

 

My take away at 65 years old? Do my writing and thinking as I walk at 2.5 MPH on my treadmill desk,  play scrabble against the computer when I get home and talk less--(keep my mouth shut until I find the word I am looking for!) 

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@lawrenceschool Students Display Creativity, Compassion Through Project Based Learning

@lawrenceschool Students Display Creativity, Compassion Through Project Based Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
How would you design a classroom to help a student from another country feel comfortable and support their learning? Children from Mrs. Erdelyi’s Lower School language arts class recently explored this question as part of a Project Based Learning lesson that began with a simple reading exercise.

Project Based Learning is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem or challenge.

“My class has been reading a book called, Dear Whiskers,” Mrs. Erdelyi explained. “One of the characters in the book is a little girl from Saudi Arabia, who does not speak or write English very well. This led to great discussions about what it would be like to come into a classroom where not only did you not know anyone, but you could not understand anyone and they could not understand you.”
Lou Salza's insight:

"....For instance, each group clearly labeled objects in the room to help the non-native speaker begin to recognize words. There was also discussion about how the desks should be arranged so the new student wouldn’t feel isolated when they sat down. It was important to the children that the student feel like a part of the group so they would be comfortable asking questions..."

Don't you just love our kids?!!--Lou


 

For instance, each group clearly labeled objects in the room to help the non-native speaker begin to recognize words. There was also discussion about how the desks should be arranged so the new student wouldn’t feel isolated when they sat down. It was important to the children that the student feel like a part of the group so they would be comfortable asking questions.

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How Special Education Rules Can Differ by State - Free Webinar @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @UnderstoodOrg

How Special Education Rules Can Differ by State - Free Webinar @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @UnderstoodOrg | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Special education law starts at the federal level, but the rules in each state can be different.That's why your child's learning issue may qualify for an IEP in one state, but not another.

In this webinar, JoAnna Barnes, J.D., gives an overview of these differences. As an example, she'll show you how specific learning disability has a different meaning in some states. You'll learn:
why the rules are different in each state
how to get information about your state's rules
how to help your child qualify for special education in your state
Lou Salza's insight:

The differences in Special Education eligibility criteria from state to state, even town to town within states is a source of frustration and even conflict between parents trying to secure services for their children and school districts trying to navigate complicated laws and regulations.--Lou

 

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Laurel School | CRG Symposium | Parent Forum @lawrenceschool.org

Laurel School | CRG Symposium | Parent Forum @lawrenceschool.org | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Christopher Parsons is a doctoral candidate in the University of Michigan’s School of Education where he teaches on methods of teaching English, academic argumentation and college writing. In his own studies, Mr. Parsons addresses gender perceptions in language arts, the role of standards in forming habits of teachers and students, and the policy of school reform. Mr. Parsons has received several awards for his work, including a Teacher of the Year Award for a region of Las Vegas’s Clark County School District (where he taught a variety of English courses at Cheyenne High School) and a Rackham Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award at the University of Michigan.
Lou Salza's insight:

 

Thursday, October 15, 2015 at 7:00 p.m.

Come Join us for an evening to hear about:

How students speak in English and science classes (featuring a cameo from the dreaded 'like')How gender affects what students do and say in class and how people reactHow students can use gender and language to come across as confident, intelligent, engaged (or not!)

 

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Help students regulate conflicts & Stop Arguments: learning to 'Drop The Rope'! @lawrenceschool

Help students regulate conflicts & Stop Arguments: learning to 'Drop The Rope'! @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Picture a tug of war between two people with each side straining to gain an advantage. This alternating battle can continue for quite some time and only ends when someone finally gives up, exhausted from the fight. But even then, nothing has been resolved. More likely, both sides are left feeling hurt and those wounds take time to heal.

However, imagine what would happen if one side – rather than pull harder in the opposite direction – simply dropped the rope. The rope would fall to the ground and the other side would have nothing to pull against – the battle is over.

Although this doesn’t immediately resolve the initial conflict, it is effective in ending the disagreement. Only then, can subsequent steps be taken if necessary, such as getting other versions of the story, sharing perspectives, finding common ground, etc.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Bill Musolf for sharing your insight with our students and families!--Lou

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Raise Awareness of Dyslexia in October @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Bookshare @bnpowers @ATDyslexia

Raise Awareness of Dyslexia in October @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Bookshare @bnpowers @ATDyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Did you know that 2.9 million children in the U.S. have a specific learning disability and one in five students has a brain-based learning and attention issue related to reading, writing, math, or organizational skills? According to the National Center for Learning Disabilities, 1 of out every 10 students in the U.S. is dyslexic, and 80 percent of children placed in special education with a learning disability are dyslexic.

In October, Bookshare is supporting National Dyslexia and National Learning Disabilities Awareness Month. It’s the perfect time to put a spotlight on learning disabilities like dyslexia, as well as resources like Bookshare that can support the community. Throughout the month, look out for inspiring stories of people with dyslexia, and help us raise awareness and educate others. In this post, we share why early identification is important and dispel some common myths about people with learning disabilities.
Lou Salza's insight:

October is National Dyslexia and National Learning Disabilities Awareness Month--Lou

National Dyslexia and National Learning Disabilities Awareness Month

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8 Films That Feature Dyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @UnderstoodOrg

8 Films That Feature Dyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @UnderstoodOrg | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Dyslexia plays a leading role in these eight movies. Watching them with your child creates an opportunity to talk about his reading issues. Ask, “What do you think the filmmakers got right? What else do you wish people knew about dyslexia?” And use them as discussion points to talk about any problems or worries he may have.
Lou Salza's insight:

Start a film discussion group among parents and students impacted by learning differences. --Lou

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Personalized Learning Is 'Based On Relationships, Not Algorithms' By @Larryferlazzo @jeffreybenson61 @lawrenceschool

Personalized Learning Is 'Based On Relationships, Not Algorithms' By @Larryferlazzo @jeffreybenson61 @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Nearly all of us have had an experience of being stuck in a class in which no matter how many times the teacher explained the concept, we just couldn't grasp it. The class whisked along, we fell further behind, and frustration mounted. Many of us have also experienced the reverse. We grew bored when the class repeatedly drilled a concept that we already understood. A stunning number of students--nearly half, according to one report--drop out of school not because they are struggling, but because they are bored.

There are several notions of what personalized learning is, but when most educators use the term today, they mean tailoring the instructional environment--what, when, how, and where students learn--to address the individual needs and abilities of each student. One benefit of a personalized model is that it opens the door for students to exercise agency and ownership for their progress and a subsequent ability to guide their own learning. They are no longer batched in classrooms where they learn the same thing on the same day in the same way. Instead, they have the flexibility to persist on a lesson until they fully comprehend the material, to receive one-on-one help when necessary, and to take the path that works best for them.

The classic example of personalized learning is the individual tutor, although of course paying for a private tutor for every student would be impossible! That's why schools are using the power of blended learning to bring the benefits of personalization within reach. Blended learning is when brick-and-mortar schools provide online lessons for students. In most personalized environments, students spend part of the course or subject online, where software adapts flexibly to differentiate for their needs. Meanwhile, teachers use the time to meet one-on-one with students, facilitate small-group experiences and Socratic discussion, and plan collaborative learning experiences, such as hands-on projects and apprenticeships that deepen the learning when laptops are shut down.
Lou Salza's insight:

Check out this conversation regarding personalized education and learning. At Lawrence, we offer small classes where the relationship between the teachers and the learners is our priority. The environment is designed strategically for our diverse learners, and their dignity is protected at all times. --Lou

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Gooooooooood morning, Lawrence School! @lawrenceschool

Gooooooooood morning, Lawrence School! @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Using an edutainment style (educating and entertaining at the same time), topics such as embracing differences, the importance of including others, how to handle disagreements, as well as many others are shared with the student community and thus defining the climate expectations. For example, this year’s group of students have already adopted our new Lawrence School Cheer. At the start of each assembly, three questions are posed and the kids respond in unison with the answer:

Who are we? Lawrence Lions!
Why are we here? To learn and achieve!
How do we do it? With respect!

So “Good Morning, Lawrence!” Today’s weather forecast is warm and sunny!
Lou Salza's insight:

Mr. Musolf is one of the main reasons why Lawrence is a 'Cool School'! Thank you Mr. Musolf, for greeting us with a smile every day, for always expecting the best from us, for listening to our concerns so thoughtfully, and for making every day a Goooooooood day!--Lou

 

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@MindShiftKQED Never Too Late: Creating a Climate for Adults to Learn New Skills @lawrenceschool

@MindShiftKQED Never Too Late: Creating a Climate for Adults to Learn New Skills @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When it comes to kids, growth mindset is a hot topic in education. Studies indicate that children who view intelligence as pliable and responsive to effort show greater persistence when encountering new or difficult tasks. In contrast, children who view intelligence as static or “fixed” have a harder time rebounding from academic setbacks or are reluctant to take on new challenges that might be difficult.

Students are not the only ones encountering new challenges at school: Teachers face an evolving profession, driven in part by technology and a rapidly changing economy.
Lou Salza's insight:

As teachers and administrators in professional learning communities we must demonstrate to ourselves and to our students that learning is a life-long endeavor that requires we keep pushing ourselves out of our comfort zones--Lou

 

My favorite passage:

"As a schools superintendent in Dobbs Ferry, New York, Dr. Lisa Brady says that teachers need to adopt a growth mindset just as much as students do.

“As educators, we cannot ask of kids what we are unwilling to do ourselves,” she said. “Students ‘sniff out’ hypocrisy quickly and it is very powerful when we model the willingness to try new things — with the struggles and failures that come along with this.”

 
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