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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
Curated by Lou Salza
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Executive Functioning in Emerging Adults TY! @Strugglingteens

Executive Functioning in Emerging Adults TY! @Strugglingteens | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Parth Gandhi, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist who specializes in the clinical assessment of adolescents and young adults, explained how Executive Function skills can determine if a young adult will be successfully independent.
Lou Salza's insight:

From our good friend and colleague Lon Woodbury!


Excerpt:

An emerging adult is one that has either turned 18 or is an adolescent growing toward adulthood. As a neuropsychologist focusing on assessments, Parth looks at young adults 18 and over who are not functioning well and question why? "I think we have less expectations for young adults now and we've become softer, less willing to let them fail," he said. "Yet, these kids need to learn from failure and they need earlier training from their parents. Kids aren't being challenged and they need those challenges to learn and grow from. When we protect them, we take away their skill building. I think it is a cultural issue and a family issue, but working with your children needs to be strategic.

- See more at: http://www.strugglingteens.com/artman/publish/WRI-K4HD_140602_-2.shtml#sthash.W52Mxasl.dpuf

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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, June 16, 1:49 AM

Good information! We can't wait to see if EF skills are in place, parents and professionals must guide growth.  By "guide growth" I mean, understand the processes of EF, assess strengths and challenges in children very young, as they are emerging, and engage in metacognitive, direct, and strategic support.

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@edtechteacher Are Your Students Distracted by Screens? Here's A Powerful Antidote - Edudemic

@edtechteacher Are Your Students Distracted by Screens? Here's A Powerful Antidote - Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

I was fortunate to teach in a 1:1 laptop classroom for seven years. In my classes, students took daily notes on computers, did research, wrote essays, created various multimedia publications, and worked on collaborative projects. Yet I knew that if I wasn’t watching their screens, my students would at some point be doing something they were not supposed to be doing. By Tom Daccord

Lou Salza's insight:

What is the antidote? Opportunities for active student engagement in  learning compared to passively sitting and listening. What a concept!--Lou

Excerpt 

"If the activity is engaging and challenging, there is an authentic audience, and prescribed time limits, students won’t mess around.

I see it at work regularly in my PD workshops. The more time I spend “teaching” teachers something from the front of the room, the more inclined they are to check email, Facebook, or whatever. The more time they spend learning actively in a challenging and engaging activity, the less they go off task. Add in the possibility that they they’ll have to present to the entire class, or post their creation online, and they’re even more focused.

More importantly, it happens in K-12 classrooms all the time. I know because when teachers relate stories of engaged students using technology, their students all ask the same question:

“Can I have more time to work on it?”

By Tom Daccord

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Want To Make Books On Your iPad? Win 'Book Creator' Free To Get Started - Edudemic

Want To Make Books On Your iPad? Win 'Book Creator' Free To Get Started - Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Red Jumper Studio is giving away:10 copies of the full version of Book Creator for iPad and (!!) 10 copies of Book Creator for Android!

For your chance to win, simply fire off an email to info @ redjumper.net with the title ‘Edudemic Book Creator giveaway ftw‘, and say whether you want the iPad or Android version. They’ll get in touch with the first 10 winners of each one and get you a free copy."

Lou Salza's insight:

Love to hear from anyone who uses this! looks like a great app!-Lou

Excerpt:

"Book Creator is the easy way to make ebooks on your tablet. After three years of success with the iPad app – 5.5 million books created and no.1 in 60 countries in the iTunes App Store, Book Creator was recently released for Android too.

The iPad app has found its place as a key educational app in classrooms across the world, putting publishing into the hands of students and enabling teachers to collaborate with classrooms in other countries. With Google ramping up Google Play for Education to take on Apple in the education market, it was an obvious choice for Book Creator to move across to the Android platform too."

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TY ! @eddebainbridge for Brainfeed: Educational Videos for Kids

TY ! @eddebainbridge for Brainfeed: Educational Videos for Kids | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Brainfeed provides all kinds of fun information to your child. It has engaging videos explaining how the universe works. The app covers science, planet earth, art, language, technology, the human body, and other topics.  The videos in the app are screened to be age-appropriate. The links in descriptions are disabled for your safety. You can also lock the app using a password.


Via Susan Bainbridge
Lou Salza's insight:

I worry that  young children who are encountering print obstacles need to have access to high quality information to develop their conceptual breadth and vocabulary.---Lou

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Mark Hoffman's comment, May 21, 12:51 PM
Hi everyone, today Brainfeed was featured in Apple's iTunes Newsletter. "iTunes Education Spotlight" Thank you Apple! We are very proud. Enjoy exploring Brainfeed!
Krysta Hammond's curator insight, May 21, 4:36 PM

Great resource for adding a visual component to your lessons, or as as app on your classroom iPad!

Catherine Douthard's curator insight, May 25, 8:57 AM

Love using this!

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Kudos to @KildonanSchool @E2ENational for Kildonan's Eye to Eye Chapter & @pensf !!

Kudos to @KildonanSchool @E2ENational for Kildonan's Eye to Eye Chapter & @pensf !! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 Kildonan School:

Kildonan’s Eye to Eye students travel to nearby Dover Elementary School each week to meet with a group of younger students who are labeled LD/ADHD.  The Kildonan students and Dover Elementary students work together using art to build a connection between their shared experiences with difficulties in learning.

Lou Salza's insight:

 Kudos to Kildonan and Eye to Eye!  In mentorship programs like this the understanding and support of older students is such a boon--and for the older kids, the opportunity to see where they have been, gives context to their struggles and adds meaning to their lives.--Lou

Excerpt:

"Taking place in an art room format, a recent art project involved the mentors and mentees creating plaster casts of their hands, which are joined together in a creative way.  The project represents the "permanent bond" the younger students make with their mentors.  While the projects themselves provide enjoyment for the students, in particular messy projects such as this one, the artwork is intended to serve as a means by which the mentees gain empowerment.  During the process of completing the project, the mentors will speak about their diagnosis of dyslexia and/or ADHD.  One younger student remarked to his parent, "Mom, I love Eye to Eye, because there are kids just like me!"

Students in Kildonan's Chapter of Eye to Eye are planning to travel to San Francisco in the spring in order to attend the Education Revolution Conference, which is organized by the Parents Education Network.  This will be the fourth year that our students will represent the school at the conference.

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Nelson Named Professor of Education | Harvard Grad. Sch of Ed- Mind, Brain and Education Dept

Nelson Named Professor of Education | Harvard Grad. Sch of Ed- Mind, Brain and Education Dept | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Charles Nelson has been named a professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education to begin on July 1, 2014. He will continue as professor of pediatrics and neuroscience and professor of psychology in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, as well as the Richard David Scott Chair in Pediatric Developmental Medicine Research at Children’s Hospital Boston, where he directs the Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Read more: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2014/05/nelson-named-professor-of-education/#ixzz32BzaZIlc

Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt:

“Chuck Nelson has contributed his significant expertise in brain and behavior development to Ed School endeavors in the past, whether through working closely with the Center on the Developing Child, contributing to the development of the Ph.D. in Education, or serving as a mentor and adviser to HGSE students working in his lab,” Dean James Ryan said. “Through this joint appointment, Chuck will now teach a new course on cognitive and brain development as they relate to developmental disabilities, support the work of the Mind, Brain, and Education Program, and advise even more master’s and doctoral students. I’m delighted that Chuck Nelson will be deepening his relationship with HGSE in these ways.”

Nelson has played a key role already at the Ed School where he has worked with the Center on the Developing Child since 2006, was instrumental in the development of the Ph.D. in Education, and has served as a mentor and adviser to many HGSE students.

“I have a long standing commitment to the Mind, Brain, and Education Program, having mentored more than a dozen students who have worked in the lab over the years,” Nelson said. “I hope to increase that commitment now that I will have one foot firmly planted on the ground in HGSE.”



Read more: http://www.gse.harvard.edu/news-impact/2014/05/nelson-named-professor-of-education/#ixzz32Bzk8g3v

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The Evolution of Assistive Technology into Everyday Products | Accessibility NZ

The Evolution of Assistive Technology into Everyday Products | Accessibility NZ | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
DEFINING TECHNOLOGY

Before discussing " assistive technology ", it is important to consider the definition of "technology ". It is entirely too easy to limit one’s understanding of that word to " computers " or computer-related topics, when in fact the concept of technology is much broader than that. Wikipedia defines technology as follows:

"Technology can be most broadly defined as the entities, both material and immaterial, created by the application of mental and physical effort in order to achieve some value. In this usage, technology refers to tools and machines that may be used to solve real-world problems." (Wikipedia, n.d.)

Lou Salza's insight:

Great read--great site! I have been feeling uncomfortable with the term 'assistive technology" recently and this site has helped me understand why.  It is 'technology' and it is 'universal design' not 'assistive'.---Lou

 

Excerpts:

This paper focuses on tools and machines (and their relevant software) used to resolve problems or eliminate barriers.

Assistive technology is, therefore, tools, machines, and software helping people with disabilities resolving issues related to their disabilities. Thinking in terms of assistive technology, people often think of designs limited to/for people with disabilities. It would be better to consider universal design instead, as a way to expand the symbiosis between technology used by/for people with disabilities and everyday products

UNIVERSAL VS. DISABILITY DESIGN

The topic of Universal Design could take up many papers in and of itself. It is important to discuss it briefly when we look at disability-related technology moving into everyday products. Universal Design is defined as:

" broad-spectrum solution that produces buildings, products and environments that are usableand effective for everyone , not just people with disabilities" (Wikipedia, n.d.) [emphasis added]

 
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Who Gets to Graduate? NYT Magazine by Paul Tough

Who Gets to Graduate? NYT Magazine by Paul Tough | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Rich students complete their college degrees; working-class students like Vanessa Brewer usually don’t. Can the University of Texas change her chances of success?
Lou Salza's insight:

Each year we lose thousands of college freshman and sophomores who arrive at college full of promise and potential but encounter an obstacle ( is it always a math class!?) that stops them cold and puts them into a tailspin. This article describes an innovative and effective program--and as sometimes happens innovation is nothing new--it is simply doing the rights things, at the right time, in the right way, with the right people. What a concept!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"The negative thoughts took different forms in each individual, of course, but they mostly gathered around two ideas. One set of thoughts was about belonging. Students in transition often experienced profound doubts about whether they really belonged — or could ever belong — in their new institution. The other was connected to ability. Many students believed in what Carol Dweck had named an entity theory of intelligence — that intelligence was a fixed quality that was impossible to improve through practice or study. And so when they experienced cues that might suggest that they weren’t smart or academically able — a bad grade on a test, for instance — they would often interpret those as a sign that they could never succeed. Doubts about belonging and doubts about ability often fed on each other, and together they created a sense of helplessness. That helplessness dissuaded students from taking any steps to change things. Why study if I can’t get smarter? Why go out and meet new friends if no one will want to talk to me anyway? Before long, the nagging doubts became self-fulfilling prophecies..."

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TY! @JohnMuirLaws for How to draw trees: Oaks

TY! @JohnMuirLaws for  How to draw trees: Oaks | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Learn how to draw trees in this simple step by step demonstration of the process of drawing an oak.
Lou Salza's insight:

I have decided that when I grow up I want to be just like John Muir Laws!  For all of us who are stuck dealing with language and print all day, John offers something amazing--the same thoughtful, scientific approach to drawing in nature that we strive for in reading nd writing with our students!

John is dyslexic and has published the most amazing nature guides!I have been a bird watcher for over 30 years.  John's  book on how to draw birds is a masterwork--and taught me how to "see" birds for the first time! --Lou

 

Excerpt:

"Trees are a ubiquitous part of the landscape. We need to get comfortable drawing them close up, in the middle ground, and distance. This step-by-step demonstration will help you draw a tree in the middle distance. At this range, individual leaves are not clearly seen, rather the shapes of large clumps of leaves dominate what we see. Getting the feel of these masses is the key to drawing trees. I often draw front to back. I start with the elements of a subject that are closest to me and then move back in space adding more parts of the subject in layers behind what I have already drawn. In drawing trees, this means I start with the clumps of leaves that are the closest to me, then add the branches and trunk, and then the shape of the leaf masses at the back of the tree. This helps me depict depth by having a series of intentionally overlapping layers. Search this tutorial for tricks and techniques that you can incorporate into your style. Try copying the demonstration then use the ideas that you like to draw trees in your neighborhood. Working from several real trees will train you to adapt these ideas to the varied life forms you will find. Click on the first image to start a step-by-step tutorial."

By John Muir Laws

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Read Aloud to Older Children! “Shared words have power that you can’t get from TV, radio, or online.”

Read Aloud to Older Children! “Shared words have power that you can’t get from TV, radio, or online.” | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Reading aloud to older children -- even up to age 14, who can comfortably read to themselves -- has benefits both academic and emotional, according to researchers.

by Holly Korbey

Lou Salza's insight:

 

Excerpt:

“The first reason to read aloud to older kids is to consider the fact that a child’s reading level doesn’t catch up to his listening level until about the eighth grade,” said Trelease, referring to a 1984 studyperformed by Dr. Thomas G. Sticht showing that kids can understand books that are too hard to decode themselves if they are read aloud. “You have to hear it before you can speak it, and you have to speak it before you can read it. Reading at this level happens through the ear.”

Research collected on middle school read-alouds showed that 58 percent of teachers read aloud to their students – and nearly 100 percent of reading and special education teachers. And, while middle-school students reported liking read-alouds, little data has been collected on the “extent and nature” of reading aloud to twelve- to fourteen-year-olds.

“Research indicates that motivation, interest, and engagement are often enhanced when teachers read aloud to middle school students,” wrote research authors Lettie K. Albright and Mary Ariail. Teachers surveyed for the study cited modeling as their number-one reason for reading aloud."

 
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Betty Skeet's curator insight, May 14, 7:54 AM

Very interesting, makes you reflect on things like the fact that children's reading level and listening level are not the same until later in their development.

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How To Use 'App Smashing' In Education - Edudemic @chatzopoulosn

How To Use 'App Smashing' In Education - Edudemic @chatzopoulosn | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The basic premise behind app smashing, sometimes referred to as “app synergy”, is to find a number of key apps that “play well” with other apps and can communicate information across platforms.
Lou Salza's insight:

This is the first of two articles about "App Smashing". This is a new concept for me one that carries an unfortunate label!  I would call it 'app combining or app integration.'  What ever we call it, App smashing as it is described and demonstrated here serves teachers and students well by supporting complex tasks that require the integration of several apps.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"The basic premise behind app smashing, sometimes referred to as “app synergy”, is to find a number of key apps that “play well” with other apps and can communicate information across platforms. Some of the native iPad apps have this capacity. Also, Explain Everything, arguably one the most comprehensive, Swiss-Army type apps ever created, is ideal for such tasks. However, the app that is the most powerful and is used in almost every app smashing activity is Apple’s Camera App. It allows the user to store pictures, video, and sound files, which can be accessed later by other apps, which is what makes app smashing possible.

In a typical app smashing activity a student can use an app to create a product such as a word cloud, a picture collage, a map, or a slide show presentation. Then the student can save his/her creation on the Camera App, even if the product in this stage is not a picture (just click the Home and the Sleep/Wake buttons simultaneously and your idevice will take a screen shot). From there, the student can choose to open those pictures in other apps that build additional layers of creativity. For instance apps such as Explain Everything, ThingLink, 30Hands, Haiku Deck, or Book Creator, can be used in that stage of the project for further annotation, feedback, analysis, or evaluation. Finally, the student might choose to import one, or multiple projects, in iMovie and create a final product that truly redefines his/her learning experience. The last step should also include publishing the final product in appropriate and accessible ways."

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"Programs for the poor often become poor programs..."The Benefits of Mixing Rich and Poor- NYT

"Programs for the poor often become poor programs..."The Benefits of Mixing Rich and Poor- NYT | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Head Start succeeds when all children are enrolled.

byDavid L. Kirp ; a professor at the Goldman School of Public Policy at the University of California at Berkeley and the author of “Improbable Scholars: The Rebirth of a Great American School System and a Strategy for America’s Schools.”

Lou Salza's insight:

In the wake of the considerable damage many states will do by legislating a third grade "reading guarantee" that will only guarantee a higher drop out rate: we should be looking to invest in high quality preschools, junior kindergartens and kindergartens. --Lou


Excerpt:

"For the better part of two centuries, public education, available to all and equal for all, has been a bedrock American principle. Imagine the outrage if a school district created pauper classes for first graders. Why should preschoolers be treated differently?"

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'Teaching strategies' not 'learning styles'- The Beginner's Guide To The Learning Pyramid Edudemic

'Teaching strategies' not 'learning styles'- The Beginner's Guide To The Learning Pyramid Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Different teaching styles appeal to different types of students. Despite popular opinion, I know folks who do really well with lecture-based courses. Perhaps they’re just really well adapted to how most of our educational system works. Or perhaps they’re just some of the few who do really well with that instead of a more hands-on approach. Most studies show that more learning happens with hands-on approaches, and the handy infographic below addresses that concept. It shows learning as a pyramid, with the least amount of retention on top, and the most on the bottom.…"

By Katie Lepi 

Lou Salza's insight:

The concept of learning "styles" ought to be replaced with teaching and learning "strategies".  Different strategies appeal to different learners. The way a teacher may have learned the concepts will not serve all of their students. This pithy illustration indicates that the more students are involved in what they are learning by either talking, practicing or even teaching others, the better their retention and learning. --Lou

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28 Things I Want Girls to Know...@AnnKlotz

28 Things I Want Girls to Know...@AnnKlotz | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I want all girls to know that knowing how to restore themselves, how to take the time to do things that bring joy, solace -- reading for pleasure, yoga, knitting, baking, running, taking a bubble bath -- is time well spent....
Lou Salza's insight:

Ann Klotz offers information, knowledge,  wisdom and inspiration every time she speaks or writes! She is the Head of Laurel School and Co director of the Center for Research on Girls ( CRG) at Laurel school. Dell and I  admire and love Ann Klotz and we love Laurel School!

 

Excerpt:

"......20) getting mad is not irreparable; sometimes we have to get angry in order to bring about change.

21) they can make a difference if elected to office and that some of them MUST take that risk. Each one must vote in every election -- no excuses. Voting is both a right and a privilege.

22) education is the way out of poverty and that education for girls is a critical global issue.

23) money matters and they must know about how to earn it, manage it, save it.

24) doing enough practical things -- using power tools, changing a tire, coping with technology -- helps women feel competent and in charge, but I also want them to know there is no shame in calling a mechanic or a plumber or tech support.

25) their bodies belong to them, always.

26) their health matters; they must be proactive about breast exams and pap smears and encourage their friends and mothers to do the same.

27) knowing how to restore themselves, how to take the time to do things that bring joy, solace -- reading for pleasure, yoga, knitting, baking, running, taking a bubble bath -- is time well spent.

28) they are not alone, that we often feel better after a good night's sleep and that we should all drink more water.

I feel grateful to Carol Gilligan for inspiring me to consider all I want our girls to know. At Laurel, we do not have all the answers, but we are interested in the questions and the many voices we encourage to participate in this conversation. Because we know #29... that learning never ends.

Follow Ann V. Klotz on Twitter: www.twitter.com/AnnKlotz

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'Great Minds Don't Think Alike!' Lawrence Loop - May 27, 2014

'Great Minds Don't Think Alike!' Lawrence Loop - May 27, 2014 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Mr. Jason Sepsi (Technology Director for the Upper School) and Mrs. Jackie Hersh (Technology Integration Specialist for the Upper School) traveled to Connecticut and New York to visit Eagle Hill - Southport, Foreman School, and Kildonnan School. The purpose of their visit was to observe and share best practices in technology in both the Lower School and Upper School grade levels. Each school they visited shared a mission similar to Lawrence School, and Jason and Jackie learned a lot about how other schools integrate assistive technology, particularly in the area of iPad use. As a result of their collaborative engagement with other experts in the field of educational technology, Jason and Jackie have built a bridge of knowledge that will enhance and improve learning opportunities for the Lawrence School students for years to come!

Lou Salza's insight:
Collaboration between and among schools that serve diverse learners will not only advance practices in our sector of the independent school community--but it may save children in public school districts from the folly of such practices as we see here in Ohio where children will be retained in the third grade next year if they fail to achieve a "cut score" on the State achievement assessment. Because of Ohio's education system failure and through no fault of their own; 30 -40% of our third graders  (8 year old children) will be traumatized along with their families and consigned to the ranks of future high school  dropouts--the fate of most children who are retained in grade during elementary school. Schools like the ones mentioned in this article --across the country--know better and do better with some of the highest risk, language learners in our schools.  Been doing better for forty years! Ask us! We can help! We want to help! Just sayin'--Lou  
From the Lawrence Loop:
Sharing Best PracticesEarlier this month, two groups of administrators and teachers traveled to the east coast to visit other schools that serve students with language-based learning differences.During the first trip, Mrs.Cheryl Cook (Upper School Academic Dean), Mr. Corey Nist (High School Teacher), Mrs. Dave Rogers (Lower School Teacher) and Ms. Lakeshia Richardson (Lower School teacher) traveled to Boston to visit with representatives from five other schools across the country that serve students with language-based learning differences. The summit was held at Carroll School outside of Boston and included the Lab School of Washington, Noble Academy in North Carolina, and the Hamilton School at Wheeler. The goal of the trip was to provide teachers from various LD schools to meet, mingle, network and share best practices. The group returned to Lawrence with renewed passion for our mission as well as new ideas to explore. 
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TY @RobNEO1st for A Video on Personalized Learning

TY @RobNEO1st  for A Video on Personalized Learning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This video, from the Learning Accelerator ( provides concrete examples and testimonials on personalized learning, though they call it blended learning.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt: Email message  to Ohio Educators from Rob Briggs , CEO of NOCHE:

 

"For sixty years, the Northeast Ohio Council on Higher Education
(NOCHE) has supported the region's colleges and universities.  We are now expanding our mission to build stronger connections between all aspects of the educational continuum, from pre-k to postsecondary and beyond.  We know that the better educated Northeast Ohioans are, the more successful our region will be..."

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Are Happy Leaders Better at Developing Resilience?

Are Happy Leaders Better at Developing Resilience? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

It is too easy to allow ourselves to feel like the roof is closing in on us. We scurry to take care of the administrivia of our jobs, whether teachers or leaders we take pride in ourselves as multi-taskers. If we stop for a minute, would it cause us to wonder about the jobs we do and our true ability to focus on any one moment? 

Lou Salza's insight:

No one needs a Beleaguered Leader--so smile and choose to feel honored to serve children and families wherever we have the privilege to serve!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"How can we teach children to be resilient if we, ourselves, are lacking resilience skills?  Kenneth Ginsberg, of CHOP (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) and Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, authors a webpage called Fostering Resilience.  On it, he describes the 7 C's as essential building blocks of resilience.  They are Competence, Confidence, Connection, Character, Contribution, Coping and Control. We are thinking about how they relate to leaders.

With increasing challenges at work and life in general, accessing our capacity to be resilient is an essential skill. We have to be competent, have confidence, be connected to our families, colleagues and friends, live our personal and professional lives with integrity, do meaningful work, handle stressful situations and all sorts of losses,  possess self-efficacy and demonstrate responsibility. And we need to guide young people  as they develop their own resilience as well. These 7 C's are researched and certainly make sense, don't they?"

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4 Ways To Nurture Self-Confidence in Young Children | Urban Child Institute BY SCOTT WILSON

4 Ways To Nurture Self-Confidence in Young Children | Urban Child Institute BY SCOTT WILSON | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Self-confidence is not inherited; it is learned. Here are some ways to encourage the development of self-confidence in your children.

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Lou Salza's insight:

Important article: self esteem is a conclusion children draw about themselves from the data they collect about what is happening around them.  The gift of feedback is so important when it comes from a source --parents, teachers & others;  whose goal it is to  support  a child's growing senses of competence and confidence.--Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"We parents just hate to see our child struggle through a difficulty. Watching her try to cram the square block into the triangle opening on the shape sorter, we’re tempted to step in and show her the correct way. But did you know that allowing her to work through these problems herself will actually boost her self-confidence?

As long as the challenge is developmentally appropriate, try to refrain from rushing in to rescue her too soon. First, offer some encouragement and guidance. When she succeeds, she’ll have a greater sense of accomplishment. Be sure she has opportunities to try problems that are just slightly beyond her skill level, so that working through the solution is both interesting and rewarding. Applauding her efforts as well her accomplishments is vital in encouraging her self-confidence."

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Ohio's independent schools fight Common Core exams

Ohio's independent  schools fight Common Core exams | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Ohio's private schools want to keep their exemption from state-required end-of-course exams they say will take away their flexibility and independence.
Lou Salza's insight:

Time for some 'common sense' along with the Common Core! Once again,the OhioState Board of Education, the Ohio  Department of Education and the State legislature confuse "standardization" with "standards."  --Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

Dan Dodd, executive director of the Ohio Association of Independent Schools (OAIS), said independent schools have the right to set their own standards, curriculum and graduation requirements.

"We oppose any state mandate that inhibits the ability of our schools to decide who can and cannot graduate," Dodd said.

Steve Murray, headmaster of University School, and D. Scott Looney, head of school at Hawken, said they don't oppose the Common Core standards. They instead say that Common Core is a significant improvement over existing standards for public school students.

But they and Dodd said that their schools thrive because they have the flexibility to set their own courses and not follow the course structure that a set of required end-of-course exams would require.

"If the state requires 10 end-of-course exams, aren't I required to offer those 10 courses?" Looney asked. "This state is dictating what courses we can teach in high school and if the state dictates curriculum, then we have no control."

He pointed to his school's entrepreneurship class that combines English, history and economics. Classes like that, he said, are multi-subject and don't fit a traditional model.

Dodd, Looney and Murray all said they are held accountable for the performance of their schools by the parents that pay tuition to send their children. They contend that student scores on the SAT and ACT tests that determine where they can attend college also show how well the school is doing.

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Connecticut in new round of State education testing, debate continues over its value

Connecticut in new round of State education testing, debate continues over its value | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
NEW HAVEN >> When one of Bob Osborne’s students became frustrated by the latest round of high-stakes testing, she began exploring how to ‘opt out,’ and presented the necessary paperwork to her mother.
Lou Salza's insight:

It is fine to raise state standards by promoting the common core. Can we have some common sense with that?!

The way our children are assessed makes no sense, adds no value to the learning going on in their classrooms, and cost significant time and money. Just sayin'.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"....The wave of a new assessment refuels the conversation about high-stakes testing and the impact testing has on student learning.

 

At the state level, the question of accountability and the effectiveness of schools, districts and the state reigns supreme. But some in higher education offer alternative forms of assessments and share concerns about excessive testing and the type of culture it potentially creates.

 

While the jury on the latest assessments is still out, opinions vary between optimism and great concern.

 

Jesse Turner, a professor at Central Connecticut State University, said standardized tests such as the SBAC and Connecticut Mastery Test have little use outside of ranking schools, districts and states. As the director of Department of Reading and Language Arts CCSU Literacy Center, Turner performs assessments himself. While there is value in diagnostic assessments that allow for personalized instruction plans, Turner said SBAC and CMT provide “little to no benefit.”

 

“The issue of those assessments is they really provide no individualized, driven instruction whatsoever,” he said. “The purpose of those assessments is really to see how my school is doing, how my nation is doing, how my state is doing, how my district is doing…”

 

 

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TY! @nytdavidbrooks for: Stairway to Wisdom, NYT

TY! @nytdavidbrooks  for: Stairway to Wisdom, NYT | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
To investigate social problems, nothing can replace the knowledge gained through relationships.
Lou Salza's insight:

David Brooks nails this!--Lou

Excerpt:

"....There is a tendency now, especially for those of us in the more affluent classes, to want to use education to make life more predictable, to seek control as the essential good, to emphasize data that masks the remorseless unpredictability of individual lives. But people engaged in direct contact with problems like teenage pregnancy are cured of those linear illusions. Those of us who work with data and for newspapers probably should be continually reminding ourselves to bow down before the knowledge of participation, to defer to the highest form of understanding, which is held by those who walk alongside others every day, who know the first names, who know the smells and fears."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, May 17, 8:24 AM

By conducting sensitive interviews and telling a specific story is the core point in the article.

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Talking to Children About Their Disabilities, With Metaphors and Minecraft by SARAH WHEELER, NYT

Talking to Children About Their Disabilities, With Metaphors and Minecraft  by SARAH WHEELER, NYT | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Those of us who have kids with disabilities in our lives spend countless hours discussing them, yet, we rarely, if ever, talk directly to children themselves about their challenges. These conversations can be scarier for the grown-ups than they are for the kids.
Lou Salza's insight:

This article recommends candor, care, and common sense when talking to students about differences they experience in learning.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

"As a psychologist, I often tell kids that I am a kind of “brain detective.” I get to find out how children learn best, and that helps everyone (including them) understand them better so they can be successful.

In these talks, there are certain words I do and do not use. I don’t use the word “disability.” I do say that all brains are different, and that every brain has some easy things and some tricky things. Some of these tricky things are more visible than others. Not being able to carry a tune can be embarrassing, but you can still avoid singing in public and belt out songs in the privacy of your shower. When reading is tricky for a child, it is always a painful and public experience. I verbalize for children how frustrating this can be, stressing that the more they know themselves and make good choices (like practicing reading even if it’s not their favorite thing to do), the happier they’ll be.

In my experience, kids have no problem understanding these concepts. And when I ask them to name some things that are easy or tricky for their brain, they are surprisingly accurate."

 
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App Smashing: Combining Google Drive, iTunes U, And Apps In The Classroom - @PrincipalCross Edudemic

App Smashing: Combining Google Drive, iTunes U, And Apps In The Classroom - @PrincipalCross  Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Many schools that have adopted one-one tablet technology struggle with the pre-requisite skills associated with moving files from app to app. This process is now called App Smashing, and when you learn how to use it to your advantage, it really does make things nice and simple. Workflow is king and the easier it is to distribute content, create solutions, and then store that information for feedback, the more success you will have in the digital classroom."

Lou Salza's insight:

Excellent! Step by step video demonstrations! Settle in, watch and learn!--Lou


Excerpts:

"In the following example, I will be demonstrating how to utilize iTunes U, various apps, and Google Drive together for a smooth classroom workflow. iTunes U will be our method of distribution, apps will provide the ability to complete work, and Google Drive will be our method of collection. (These training videos take into account that you already know how to set up courses in iTunes University. If you do not, please refer to the iTunes U training for more information....


...All of these training videos and more are part of an iTunes U course that can be found by going to the following address on your iPad device. In this course you will find other materials on creating iTunes U content, and more ways to App Smash your way to a successful classroom...."

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Re-Imagining a Future For Our Kids Lawrence School video318208_4306449.mp4

Excerpt from Lou Salza's speech at the 2014 Annual Benefit Auction Bloom 2014 , Lawrence School Annual Gala 

video318208_4306449.mp4

Lou Salza's insight:

Re Imagining the Future For Our Kids

6 min Excerpt from Lou's speech at  Bloom" the 2014 Annual Benefit Auction, 
 Saturday May 3rd,  Lawrence School hosted "Bloom 2014" our Annual Gala Fundraising event. It was a record breaking evening with 450 in attendance for which I am deeply grateful. The video clip articulates a message I have been working hard to promote about what is happening at least in Ohio to our students with learning differences--and the many children we fail in our schools when it comes to teaching reading.--Lou

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Barbara Hunter's comment, May 12, 3:10 AM
Well said Lou. A shared passion, indeed! See you in the trenches...
Lou Salza's comment, May 12, 3:54 AM
Thank you Barbara! Trenches indeed!
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TY! @NickKristof What’s So Scary About Smart Girls? (Want to stick it to Boko Haram? Help educate a girl.)

TY! @NickKristof What’s So Scary About Smart Girls? (Want to stick it to Boko Haram? Help educate a girl.) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The greatest threat to extremism isn’t an army. It’s girls reading books. Want to stick it to Boko Haram? Help educate a girl.

Lou Salza's insight:

For decades we have known that the quality of life in any country goes up markedly when the population is educated--especially girls.  Educate a girl; educate a family.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...any of us can stick it to Boko Haram by helping to educate a girl. A $40 gift at Camfed.org buys a uniform so that a girl can go to school.

We can also call on members of Congress to pass the International Violence Against Women Act, which would elevate the issue of sexual violence on the global agenda.

Boko Haram has a stronghold in northeastern Nigeria because it’s an area where education is weak and women are marginalized.Some two-thirds of women in the region have had no formal education. Only 1 in 20 has completed high school. Half are married by age 15..."

 

.."

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