Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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@edtechteacher Are Your Students Distracted by Screens? Here's A Powerful Antidote - Edudemic

@edtechteacher Are Your Students Distracted by Screens? Here's A Powerful Antidote - Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

I was fortunate to teach in a 1:1 laptop classroom for seven years. In my classes, students took daily notes on computers, did research, wrote essays, created various multimedia publications, and worked on collaborative projects. Yet I knew that if I wasn’t watching their screens, my students would at some point be doing something they were not supposed to be doing. By Tom Daccord

Lou Salza's insight:

What is the antidote? Opportunities for active student engagement in  learning compared to passively sitting and listening. What a concept!--Lou

Excerpt 

"If the activity is engaging and challenging, there is an authentic audience, and prescribed time limits, students won’t mess around.

I see it at work regularly in my PD workshops. The more time I spend “teaching” teachers something from the front of the room, the more inclined they are to check email, Facebook, or whatever. The more time they spend learning actively in a challenging and engaging activity, the less they go off task. Add in the possibility that they they’ll have to present to the entire class, or post their creation online, and they’re even more focused.

More importantly, it happens in K-12 classrooms all the time. I know because when teachers relate stories of engaged students using technology, their students all ask the same question:

“Can I have more time to work on it?”

By Tom Daccord

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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Untangled: The Critical Work of Raising Teenage Girls @LDamour @lawrenceschool 

Untangled: The Critical Work of Raising Teenage Girls @LDamour @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Parents of teenage girls know that their daughters enjoy terrific strengths and face unique challenges as they move through adolescence. Though we often describe the teenage years as stressful, raising a teenage girl doesn't have to feel like a tangled mess. In fact, Lisa Damour says there is a predictable pattern to teenage development, an actual blueprint for how girls develop into thriving adults.
 
Join us for a conversation with Lisa Damour, Ph.D., a Cleveland-based psychologist and ​New York Times ​best-selling author of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood. Dr. Damour blends her clinical experience, time-honored wisdom, and the latest research findings to describe the seven transitions that turn girls into grown-ups. In doing so, she helps parents understand and support their daughters (and sons!) as they navigate the pivotal teenage years.
 
Lou Salza's insight:
An important uplifting message about teen girls and teens of all persuasions including those older folks who love and care for them!
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 Why Finland has the best schools @lawrenceschool 

 Why Finland has the best schools @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In Finland, children don't receive formal academic training until the age of seven. Until then, many are in day care and learn through play, songs, games and conversation. Most children walk or bike to school, even the youngest. School hours are short and homework is generally light.

Unlike in the United States, where many schools are slashing recess, schoolchildren in Finland have a mandatory 15-minute outdoor free-play break every hour of every day. Fresh air, nature and regular physical activity breaks are considered engines of learning. According to one Finnish maxim, "There is no bad weather. Only inadequate clothing."

One evening, I asked my son what he did for gym that day. "They sent us into the woods with a map and compass and we had to find our way out," he said.

Finland doesn't waste time or money on low-quality mass standardised testing. Instead, children are assessed every day, through direct observation, check-ins and quizzes by the highest-quality "personalised learning device" ever created - flesh-and-blood teachers.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 1:20 PM
Two key points emerged. First, students need teachers, flesh-and-blood teachers to be exact. Second, the Howard Gardner quote is important. We can learn something from the Finns. We cannot and should not take everything they do and impose it in our schools. What works best is adapting what they do to what we need. It is about asking questions. What does play look like for our children? How do we reduce testing and homework, even eliminate it? It takes leadership rather than management which is what many schools in North America have in place.
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DC's Children's Business Fair featuring Little Loft founder and entrepreneur Lia Salza Goldstein  @lawrenceschool @NAISnetwork

DC's Children's Business Fair featuring Little Loft founder and entrepreneur Lia Salza Goldstein  @lawrenceschool @NAISnetwork | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Join us for the Acton Children's Business Fair launch party, where you will:

Hear the inspirational story of entrepreneur Lia Salza Goldstein, founder of Little Loft, a neighborhood art space for parents and children with locations in Washington, DC and Oregon

Learn the "3 Magic Seeds" of starting a business

Meet other young entrepreneurs and get your questions about Acton Children's Business Fair answered

WHEN
Saturday, April 16, 2016 from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM (EDT) - Add to Calendar
WHERE
Washington - Tenleytown Library 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016 - View Map
Lou Salza's insight:
Daughter Lia is hitting her stride in the National Capital Region: branches of Little Loft now in Portland, Takoma Park and Capitol Hill. How about Cleveland, Lia!?
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Habits for success in school and life: instituteforhabitsofmind.com/ @lawrenceschool 

Habits for success in school and life: instituteforhabitsofmind.com/ @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The 16 Habits of Mind are drawn from a modern view of intelligence that casts off traditional abilities-centered theories and replaces them with a growth mindset for remaining open to continuous learning, another important habit. These habits are often called soft skills or non-cognitive skills. In fact, these skills are among the most difficult to develop because they require a great deal of consciousness. Ultimately, they become an internal compass that helps us answer the question, “What is the most ‘thought-full’ thing that I can do right now?”
Lou Salza's insight:
Nothing "soft" or "non-Cognitive" about the these habits of mind! Could these be useful in developing rubrics and standards for proficiency based assessments and transcripts? --Lou
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Rina Answer's curator insight, March 22, 9:12 PM

In 5 years I will have finished my dual Bachelor of Accident Forensics/OH&S Degree. Although fingers crossed I will be working full-time in the police force. I hope to continue learning by doing part-time studies at whichever University I’ll be in the vicinity of. Continuous learning is very important for me as it signifies that you are open to change and growth, both of which are unavoidable in current society. As this Scoop presents, this is an important habit that individuals need to possess to be successful in life.

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Is Homework wrecking our kids? @lawrenceschool 

Is Homework wrecking our kids? @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students.”

This statement, by homework research guru Harris Cooper, of Duke University, is startling to hear, no matter which side of the homework debate you’re on. Can it be true that the hours of lost playtime, power struggles and tears are all for naught? That millions of families go through a nightly ritual that doesn’t help? Homework is such an accepted practice, it’s hard for most adults to even question its value.

When you look at the facts, however, here’s what you find: Homework has benefits, but its benefits are age dependent.
Lou Salza's insight:
Homework is much more about compliance than it is about competence. The 'Homework wars' are destroying family life as well as torturing children. --Lou
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Philippe Colinot's curator insight, March 11, 3:24 AM
Homework is much more about compliance than it is about competence. The 'Homework wars' are destroying family life as well as torturing children. --Lou
Decoding Dyslexia IL 's curator insight, March 13, 5:37 AM
Homework is much more about compliance than it is about competence. The 'Homework wars' are destroying family life as well as torturing children. --Lou
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How widespread is dyslexia? – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

How widespread is dyslexia? – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Empty description
Lou Salza's insight:
IDA now states that 1 in 5 may have "symptoms of Dyslexia" which is a more defensible position. This prevalence seems reasonable given the ineffective reading instruction that holds children back from achieving benchmark literacy skills in the primary grades. --Lou
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President Signs Smith Dyslexia Bill Into Law @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers

President Signs Smith Dyslexia Bill Into Law @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The READ Act requires the president’s annual budget request to Congress to include the Research in Disabilities Education program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). As amended, the bill requires the NSF to devote at least $2.5 million annually to dyslexia research, which would focus on best practices in the following areas:

•Early identification of children and students with dyslexia

•Professional development about dyslexia for teachers and administrators

•Curricula development and evidence-based educational tools for children with dyslexia
Lou Salza's insight:

While I am happy to read this news: I am mindful that legislation and research in the past--as good as they can be for illuminating best practices, do not guarantee implementation or execution in our schools. Time to double down on school to school, door to door, teacher to teacher advocacy for evidence based reading approaches in grades K-4 and early and frequent screening to make sure children are making progress towards literacy benchmarks. In those situations where they are not, intervention needs to be swift, intense and delivered by a knowledgeable teacher. --Lou 

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TY! @drseide for New ADA Guidelines for Students With Dyslexia & other LDs @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

TY! @drseide for New ADA Guidelines for Students With Dyslexia & other LDs @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Justice has released final regulations for the Americans with Disabilities Act that focus on improving conditions, achievement for students with dyslexia and other learning disorders.

"The new regulation guide and letter to school districts address problematic policies which have required students and their families to undergo repeated costly testing for documentation of dyslexia, dysgraphia,dyscalculia, and other LDs,” says DyslexicAdvantage.org.

The guide also attempts to fix the problem of students with learning disabilities not being supported until they repeatedly fail; test accommodations should be made to reflect aptitude and achievement levels.
Lou Salza's insight:

At last! Common sense approach to a common problem that has plagued our students for decades!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"The new guidelines also help students with disabilities circumvent the difficult process of being asked to provide extensive documentation for testing accommodations by defining limits.If a candidate requests the same testing accommodations he or she previously received on a similar standardized exam or high-stakes test, provides proof of having received the previous testing accommodations, and certifies his or her current need for the testing accommodations due to disability, then a testing entity should generally grant the same testing accommodations for the current standardized exam or high-stakes test without requesting further documentation from the candidate. So, for example, a person with a disability who receives a testing accommodation to sit for the SAT should generally get the same testing accommodation to take the GRE, LSAC, or MCAT."

- See more at: http://www.educationworld.com/a_news/ada-releases-new-guidelines-students-dyslexia-other-learning-disabilities-66268031#sthash.OHsYJPYt.dpuf

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.@CBSTHISMORNING tomorrow: @LDamour author, #UNTANGLED Guiding Girls Through the 7 Transitions to Adulthood @lawrenceschool -

.@CBSTHISMORNING tomorrow: @LDamour author, #UNTANGLED Guiding Girls Through the 7 Transitions to Adulthood @lawrenceschool - | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

To celebrate the publication date of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions Into Adulthood I'll be joining anchors Charlie Rose, Norah O'Donnell, and Gayle King on CBS THIS MORNING for an interview tomorrow. Look for me (or set your DVR!) between 8:00 and 8:45 a.m.

You can see reviews of the book and my upcoming speaking schedule at drlisadamour.com
 
With best wishes,
Lisa

Lisa Damour, PhD
216.548.7367
drlisadamour.com
Author of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood
(Ballantine, February 2016)
Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and at the New York Times.

Lou Salza's insight:

Lisa is a friend and colleague whose work supports schools and families all over NEOH. She is the Director of the Center for Research on Girls at Laurel School. Her new book Untangled is due out this week! Don't miss Lisa--and get the book!--Lou 

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How Measurement Fails Doctors and Teachers By ROBERT M. WACHTER @nytimes @lawrenceschool @mmorino

How Measurement Fails Doctors and Teachers By ROBERT M. WACHTER @nytimes @lawrenceschool @mmorino | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Avedis Donabedian, a professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, was a towering figure in the field of quality measurement. He developed what is known as Donabedian’s triad, which states that quality can be measured by looking at outcomes (how the subjects fared), processes (what was done) and structures (how the work was organized). In 2000, shortly before he died, he was asked about his view of quality. What this hard-nosed scientist answered is shocking at first, then somehow seems obvious.

“The secret of quality is love,” he said.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thoughtful commentary!--Lou

Excerpt:

".....Measurement cannot go away, but it needs to be scaled back and allowed to mature. We need more targeted measures, ones that have been vetted to ensure that they really matter. In medicine, for example, measuring the rates of certain hospital-acquired infections has led to a greater emphasis on prevention and has most likely saved lives. On the other hand, measuring whether doctors documented that they provided discharge instructions to heart failure or asthma patients at the end of their hospital stay sounds good, but turns out to be an exercise in futile box-checking, and should be jettisoned.

 

We also need more research on quality measurement and comparing different patient populations. The only way to understand whether a high mortality rate, or dropout rate, represents poor performance is to adequately appreciate all of the factors that contribute to these outcomes — physical and mental, social and environmental — and adjust for them. It’s like adjusting for the degree of difficulty when judging an Olympic diver. We’re getting better at this, but we’re not good enough...."

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Karina Eide Young Writers Competition - Students with Dyslexia @drseide @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

Karina Eide Young Writers Competition - Students with Dyslexia @drseide @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Dyslexic Advantage, a leading charitable organization dedicated to the education and support of individuals with dyslexia, is pleased to announce the official opening of the 2nd Annual Karina Eide Young Writers Awards, a competition open exclusively to students with dyslexia. Students from public and private schools and homeschooling students are all welcome.
Cash prizes and honorable mentions will be awarded to student entrants who demonstrate creativity and excellence in writing. All styles and genres are welcome, including fan fiction, short stories and poetry as well as chapter excerpts from longer works. Non-cash prizes, including certificates of special recognition, will also be awarded.
Unlike other writing competitions, submission to the Karina Eide Young Dyslexic Writers Awards will not be judged based on spelling or grammar. Rather, entries will be evaluated on the basis of creativity, humor, storytelling ability and other aspects of quality writing. Entrants are allowed to either type their works or dictate them, whichever they prefer.
Lou Salza's insight:

Brock and Fernette Eide are doing remarkable work re-framing the conversation around dyslexia and dyslexics.--Lou 

Excerpt:

"At Dyslexic Advantage, our mission is to help recognize and encourage the talents and strengths that come from this amazing community, " comments the organization's co-founder, Dr. Fernette Eide. "Our Karina Young Writers Awards helps us celebrate young dyslexic writers' creativity and encourage greater expression without the restraints of conventional writing competitions."

All entries must be submitted no later than January 21st. Winners will be announced on March 15th. To learn more about the awards or to submit an entry, please visit:

http://bit.ly/karina-awards

Contact: 
Fernette Eide M.D., Co-Founder 
Dyslexic Advantage 
Voice Phone: 1-800-757-8310 x 705 
Fax Number: 425-609-0050 
Email: drseide(at)dyslexicadvantage(dot)org 
Website: http://dyslexicadvantage.org

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What’s Worth Learning in School? — David Perkins, @ProjectZeroHGSE @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

What’s Worth Learning in School? — David Perkins, @ProjectZeroHGSE @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We teach a lot that isn’t going to matter, in a significant way, in students’ lives, writes Professor David Perkins in his new book, “Future Wise.” There’s also much we aren’t teaching that would be a better return on investment.
Professor David Perkins likes to tell this story: Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi was getting on a train. One of his sandals slipped off and fell to the ground. The train was moving, and there was no time to go back. Without hesitation, Gandhi took off his second sandal and threw it toward the first. Asked by his colleague why he did that, he said one sandal wouldn’t do him any good, but two would certainly help someone else.
As Perkins writes in his new book, Future Wise, “People cherish the story as a marvelous example of a charitable act. And so it is, on a small scale, seizing a singular moment.”
But as he also points out, and as he told an audience at the Future of Learning institute held this past summer at the Ed School, it was more than that: It was also a knowledgeable act. By throwing that sandal, Gandhi had two important insights: He knew what people in the world needed, and he knew what to let go of.
Lou Salza's insight:

 By David Perkins HGSE  Research Professor of Teaching and Learning, Learning and Teaching Program, Technology, Innovation, and Education Program, Project Zero

 

Perkins challenges the assumptions we make--and the design of curriculum that promote narrow views of information retention, achievement, and expertise. He compares our schools' curricumul to a a garage with old stuff we no longer need--and suggests we start clearing it out!--Lou

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There are 1,000 Reasons to Give. What's Yours? - YouTube @lawrenceschool

During this giving season, please consider supporting the Annual Fund at Lawrence School: www.lawrenceschool.org/give

The Annual Fund supports every aspect of our school, including leading-edge assistive technology; extracurricular, fine arts and athletic programs; specialized teacher professional development; and tuition assistance.

Lou Salza's insight:

My reason to give? Lawrence School changes the way students think of themselves and one another. The change is visible, audible, and transformative. This change fosters confidence, and confidence makes a thousand possibilities for every student become real. Congratulations to Paul Warner and all the students, parents and staff who produced a sweet annual appeal for Lawrence School!--Lou

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 3, 4:53 PM

My reason to give? Lawrence School changes the way students think of themselves and one another. The change is visible, audible, and transformative. This change fosters confidence, and confidence makes a thousand possibilities for every student become real. Congratulations to Paul Warner and all the students, parents and staff who produced a sweet annual appeal for Lawrence School!--Lou

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Online Dyslexia Simulation Is Compelling, Powerful, and Wrong – International Dyslexia Association by @cdcowen @bnpowers @lawrenceschool

Online Dyslexia Simulation Is Compelling, Powerful, and Wrong – International Dyslexia Association by @cdcowen @bnpowers @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

On March 3, an item was published on the Internet that compelled me to step forward. You may have seen it, a post claiming to simulate what it is like to read with dyslexia. I admit that I am not a fan of dyslexia simulations. At best, they seem overly simplistic. At worst, they distort. But the technical ingenuity of this recent dyslexia simulation coupled with the dynamism of the Internet makes this one compelling, powerful, and deeply troubling.
 
The post uses the text of Wikipedia’s definition of dyslexia (not one of the better ones). Its algorithm scrambles all but initial and final letters 20 times a second in randomly selected words. I hate sending any more traffic to this simulation; however, understanding exactly what it does is difficult to grasp without seeing it. Here is the URL: http://geon.github.io/programming/2016/03/03/dsxyliea

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Why Schools Should Make Sleep a Priority @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool

Why Schools Should Make Sleep a Priority @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Sleep. We all know kids need it, and without it, they don't perform as well in school.

As we've reported in the past, the National Academy of Pediatrics recommends that middle and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. to better align with the natural body rhythms of adolescents.
Lou Salza's insight:
Important article for home and school!-Lou
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 7, 10:34 AM
This is an important article. We have known the benefits of good sleeo for children for years and fail to implement changes to schools that meet those needs. On top of it, parents some allow children to hide in their rooms playing on screens through the night.
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Kindle Fire's Word Wise: Power Up Student Vocabulary @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

Kindle Fire's Word Wise: Power Up Student Vocabulary @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Word Wise, available on many popular English language titles, makes it easier to enjoy and quickly understand more challenging books. Short and simple definitions automatically appear above difficult words, so you can keep reading with fewer interruptions. Tap on a word to bring up a simple card with definitions, synonyms, and more. You can adjust the number of hints you see with a simple slider.
Lou Salza's insight:
Just got a new Kindle Fire with this great new feature: definitions and synonyms appear above challenging or unusual words and terms. This will help or dyslexic readers. The feature can be combined with Kindle Immersion reading ( simultaneous narration along with text) for a powerful aid to phonological processing and semantic access. Way cool!--Lou 
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Accountability in gov't?: A Federal Program that Is Accountable & Working @PaulCarttar @mmorino

From its inception in the early days of the Obama presidency, the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) was positioned as a different kind of program, actively touted by the White House to be a "new way of doing business" for the federal government.

Seven years later, despite its early hype and controversy, a set of independent reports released in December by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the SIF's parent agency, clearly establish that the SIF is very different—in its readiness to embrace accountability for results and its demonstrated success to date in generating them.

As the SIF's initial director, I'm very sad to say, however, that these reports appear to have gone unnoticed by the nonprofit press, the public policy community, even the blogosphere. While under some circumstances this neglect might be benign, today it is not. Indeed, given the prevailing skepticism about Washington, the SIF's recent Congressional appropriations struggles, and the fast-approaching end of the Obama administration, it is essential that all who genuinely care about accountability in government and the concept of funding programs that really work take notice, digest this rich vein of information, and let your views on its value be known.
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Effective Reading Instruction – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @IntlDyslexia 

Effective Reading Instruction – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @IntlDyslexia  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The most difficult problem for students with dyslexia is learning to read. Unfortunately, popularly employed reading approaches, such as Guided Reading or Balanced Literacy, are not effective for struggling readers. These approaches are especially ineffective for students with dyslexia because they do not focus on the decoding skills these students need to succeed in reading.

What does work is Structured Literacy, which prepares students to decode words in an explicit and systematic manner. This approach not only helps students with dyslexia, but there is substantial evidence that it is more effective for all readers.
Lou Salza's insight:
Structured Literacy as defined by IDA: systematic, explicit, direct instruction in phonology. Research indicates this approach benefits all children learning to read. -Lou
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N'Quavah Velazquez, EdD's curator insight, March 6, 10:50 AM
Structured Literacy as defined by IDA: systematic, explicit, direct instruction in phonology. Research indicates this approach benefits all children learning to read. -Lou
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Assistive Tech webinar on March 23rd w/ @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool  @cdcowen 

Assistive Tech webinar on March 23rd w/ @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool  @cdcowen  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This webinar will focus on the basics of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and how assistive technology (AT) helps teachers create inclusive classrooms that allow all of their students, including those with dyslexia, to reach academic success. The discussion will address the three principles of UDL and how assistive technology follows those principles. Next, there will be a discussion about the main categories of AT that dyslexic students can use to reach their potentials, including text-to-speech, dictation, word prediction, study skills, and graphic organizers. Finally, the webinar will turn to common myths about dyslexia and assistive technology and why AT should be viewed as a legitimate learning tool.
Lou Salza's insight:
Jamie Martin's work is crucial to our profession! Don't miss this opportunity to promote teaching and learning in every school for every student!--Lou
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 3, 4:49 PM
Jamie Martin's work is crucial to our profession! Don't miss this opportunity to promote teaching and learning in every school for every student!--Lou
Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, March 4, 12:35 AM
Jamie Martin's work is crucial to our profession! Don't miss this opportunity to promote teaching and learning in every school for every student!--Lou
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Learn More About Your Child's School Day: Say 'High-Low-High'! @lawrenceschool @vdiffenbacher @_jculp

Learn More About Your Child's School Day: Say 'High-Low-High'! @lawrenceschool @vdiffenbacher @_jculp | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“High-Low-High” structures responses to require one highpoint of the day, one low point, and then another highpoint as a finale. It isn’t foolproof, but does help get the conversation started.

I have three kids – a junior in high school, and a set of 8th grade, boy/girl twins. Rather than asking how their day was, I ask each individually, in turn, to “High-Low-High me.” In fact, my kids will “High-Low-High” me regularly now as well.

This technique has led to the sharing of more details than a “Kay” response has ever given. It has also been effective in prompting conversation on days when there aren’t obvious highs or lows – some days are simply more even keeled. But even those days have some simple moments in them that are better than others, and there certainly is some mental health in appreciating the little things in life.
Lou Salza's insight:

Bill Musolf joined Lawrence in June 2007 as the Dean of Students at the Lower School campus. He has been in education since 1993, serving as a school psychologist and elementary guidance counselor. Bill received his bachelor’s degree in Psychology from The Ohio State University, and completed both his master’s and Education Specialist degrees at Michigan State University. He can be contacted at bmusolf@lawrenceschool.org. 

 
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.@lawrenceschool #Untangled @LDamour Local author goes national! @CBSThisMorning

.@lawrenceschool #Untangled @LDamour Local author goes national! @CBSThisMorning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In this sane, highly engaging, and informed guide for parents of daughters, Dr. Damour draws on decades of experience and the latest research to reveal the seven distinct—and absolutely normal—developmental transitions that turn girls into grown-ups, including Parting with Childhood, Contending with Adult Authority, Entering the Romantic World, and Caring for Herself. Providing realistic scenarios and welcome advice on how to engage daughters in smart, constructive ways, Untangled gives parents a broad framework for understanding their daughters while addressing their most common questions, including 
My thirteen-year-old rolls her eyes when I try to talk to her, and only does it more when I get angry with her about it. How should I respond?
Do I tell my teen daughter that I’m checking her phone?
Where’s the line between healthy eating and having an eating disorder?
My daughter’s friend is cutting herself. Do I call the girl’s mother to let her know?
Perhaps most important, Untangled helps mothers and fathers understand, connect, and grow with their daughters. When parents know what makes their daughter tick, they can embrace and enjoy the challenge of raising a healthy, happy young woman.
Lou Salza's insight:

To celebrate the publication date of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions Into Adulthood Lisa will be joining anchors Charlie Rose, Norah O'Donnell, and Gayle King on CBS THIS MORNING for an interview tomorrow. Look for her (or set your DVR!) between 8:00 and 8:45 a.m.--Lou

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MIT Prof: What Every Person with Dyslexia Should Know by @drseide @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

MIT Prof: What Every Person with Dyslexia Should Know by @drseide @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Superstar MIT Professor Catherine Drennan (HHMI Scientist too – the top of the top in the world) shared her personal journey with dyslexia. She was in remedial classes and had to repeat a grade, and saw her self dropped lower and lower through all the reading groups, until her parents were pulled aside and told “She’s probably not going to be able to graduate from high school…”

Check out Cathy’s advice below and watch her entire story at the bottom of this video!  Cathy’s wisdom is something that everyone with dyslexia should know.
Lou Salza's insight:

If you love someone with dyslexia,  check this out! --Lou 

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 3, 4:50 PM

If you love someone with dyslexia,  check this out! --Lou 

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Defining My Dyslexia @blakecharlton @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

Defining My Dyslexia @blakecharlton @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I STARTED cataloging insults in the second grade. Notable put-downs heard outside my special-ed classroom included “dimwinky,” “retardochuckles” and “the meat in the sandwich of stupid.” The last of which, if you think about it, is a seriously impressive use of metaphor for a 7-year-old. I learned all the jokes about dyslexia, and told them to better effect than anyone else. Making fun of myself was my best defense. The other choices — hiding from my diagnosis or accepting myself as limited — didn’t appeal.

Fortunately, humor and hard work proved a good strategy. Also helpful were my crafty parents. They often read out loud to me and, noticing my passion for fantasy novels, would stop at the most exciting point in a chapter — then leave the book in case I wanted to read by myself. It wasn’t long before I was sneaking paperbacks into study hall.

Though slow out of the gate — I couldn’t read fluently until 13 — I went to Yale, then medical school at Stanford, and I published two fantasy novels with disabled heroes (think Harry Potter and the Special-Ed Classroom). At every step, I used my diagnosis to my advantage, arguing that I had succeeded despite being dyslexic. It helped me stand out.
Lou Salza's insight:

In case you missed this: Dr. Blake Carlton is the author of the Spellwright Trilogy and a physician--who happens to be dyslexic.

--Lou

http://www.amazon.com/Spellwright-The-Trilogy-Blake-Charlton/dp/0765356589

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 9, 1:41 PM
Where are the teachers in all of this? We are each different in unique ways and that is what makes us who we are as a person.
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Is School Making Our Children Sick? By VICKI ABELES @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers

Is School Making Our Children Sick? By VICKI ABELES @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....54 percent of students showed moderate to severe symptoms of depression. More alarming, 80 percent suffered moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety.

“This is so far beyond what you would typically see in an adolescent population,” he told the school’s faculty at a meeting just before the fall semester began. “It’s unprecedented.” Worse, those alarming figures were probably an underestimation; some students had missed the survey while taking Advanced Placement exams.

What Dr. Slavin saw at Irvington is a microcosm of a nationwide epidemic of school-related stress. We think of this as a problem only of the urban and suburban elite, but in traveling the country to report on this issue, I have seen that this stress has a powerful effect on children across the socioeconomic spectrum.

Expectations surrounding education have spun out of control. On top of a seven-hour school day, our kids march through hours of nightly homework, daily sports practices and band rehearsals, and weekend-consuming assignments and tournaments. Each activity is seen as a step on the ladder to a top college, an enviable job and a successful life. Children living in poverty who aspire to college face the same daunting admissions arms race, as well as the burden of competing for scholarships, with less support than their privileged peers. Even those not bound for college are ground down by the constant measurement in schools under pressure to push through mountains of rote, impersonal material as early as preschool....."

Lou Salza's insight:

I found this article provocative because the author teaches at a medical school and discovered that med students were suffering due to the stresses imposed by the curriculum at the St. Louis School of Medicine.

 

I feel that students with learning differences like dyslexia, ADHD and high functioning autism have been the 'canaries in the coal mine'  of our schools for 4 decades. Is it finally time to take a few steps back and save all children and all students from ridiculous 19th Century requirements to memorize useless information, complete hours of busy work, achieve benchmark scores on high stakes tests, and run the gauntlet we call 'grading' in schools? 

Are we force feeding our children a diet that stifles curiosity and turns them into nervous, exhausted, sleep deprived wrecks? Seems so! --Just sayin'--Lou

 

 

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 3, 4:51 PM

I found this article provocative because the author teaches at a medical school and discovered that med students were suffering due to the stresses imposed by the curriculum at the St. Louis School of Medicine.


 


I feel that students with learning differences like dyslexia, ADHD and high functioning autism have been the 'canaries in the coal mine'  of our schools for 4 decades. Is it finally time to take a few steps back and save all children and all students from ridiculous 19th Century requirements to memorize useless information, complete hours of busy work, achieve benchmark scores on high stakes tests, and run the gauntlet we call 'grading' in schools? 


Are we force feeding our children a diet that stifles curiosity and turns them into nervous, exhausted, sleep deprived wrecks? Seems so! --Just sayin'--Lou


 


 

SiwanJones's curator insight, March 3, 5:15 PM

I found this article provocative because the author teaches at a medical school and discovered that med students were suffering due to the stresses imposed by the curriculum at the St. Louis School of Medicine.

 

I feel that students with learning differences like dyslexia, ADHD and high functioning autism have been the 'canaries in the coal mine'  of our schools for 4 decades. Is it finally time to take a few steps back and save all children and all students from ridiculous 19th Century requirements to memorize useless information, complete hours of busy work, achieve benchmark scores on high stakes tests, and run the gauntlet we call 'grading' in schools? 

Are we force feeding our children a diet that stifles curiosity and turns them into nervous, exhausted, sleep deprived wrecks? Seems so! --Just sayin'--Lou

 

 

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Five Ways to Help Your Child Conquer Tests, and Learn from Them - @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool

Five Ways to Help Your Child Conquer Tests, and Learn from Them - @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Used correctly, tests can help students achieve three crucial aims: supporting student recall (tests force students to pull information from their own heads, enhancing retention); enhancing their awareness of their own mental processes (in the process of being tested and getting feedback, students fine-tune their sense of what they know and don’t know); and nurturing the noncognitive skills students develop from facing challenges (tests represent a kind of controlled adversity, an ideal arena for honing skills like resilience and perseverance).

In a perfect world, schools, parents and students would consciously treat tests as occasions for learning and growth, focusing less on the result and more on the powerful benefits of simply taking the test in the first place. But no matter how the school approaches testing, parents can help children at all ages use the experiences to learn about the material, about the process of being tested,and about themselves. Here are some strategies for getting the most out of the testing process.
Lou Salza's insight:

"Make tests an opportunity for learning!" Good advice to deal with a necessary part of our academic world at least for the foreseeable future.--Lou 

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