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Braingenie - Math and Science Practice

Braingenie - Math and Science Practice | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Braingenie is the Web's most comprehensive math and science practice site. Popular among educators and families, Braingenie provides practice and video lessons in more than 4,000 skills.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Teen Mental Health Tops Parents' Concerns, Yet Few Get Treated @lawrenceschool

Teen Mental Health Tops Parents' Concerns, Yet Few Get Treated @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“Everybody is in denial about depression and anxiety,” Dr. Aaron Krasner, the adolescent transitional living service chief at Silver Hill, told Yahoo. “So it makes sense to me that until the sh-- is really hitting the fan, parents and kids aren’t interested in talking about these problems. In some ways, parents don’t want to know and would rather do anything than acknowledge that their kid has a problem.” 

Mental health issues are prevalent among teens: The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) cited four million children and adolescents in the United States suffer from a serious mental disorder, with 21 percent of children ages 9 to 17 having a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder. NAMI added when these disorders are left untreated, teens use more health care services and face higher health care costs when they become adults. And for teens whose issues stem from bullying, they’re more likely to suffer from mental health problems later in life.
Lou Salza's insight:

Concerns about depression and anxiety are especially relevant to families of children and adolescents who struggle in school with learning differences. Isn't it time we all gave ourselves permission to speak more openly, work more cooperatively, and implement programs more thoughtfully than we are right now?---Lou

 

My favorite passage: 

"......parents need to start thinking of mental health issues, like anxiety and depression, as the psychiatric illnesses they are, not “character flaws.” Mental disorders are neurological problems, and there are treatments available for teens to reduce their symptoms."

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@Learning_Ally Denver Schools give 80K audiobooks to struggling students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

@Learning_Ally Denver Schools give 80K audiobooks to struggling students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
DENVER - Denver Public Schools gave 80,000 audiobooks to students struggling with dyslexia.

Dyslexia and other reading disabilities affect one in every five Colorado students according to Learning Alley, a national nonprofit organization who helps students who are blind, visually impaired, or dyslexic.

Students will be able to access 80,000 books on their computers, tablets, smartphones, iPods, or other devices. The audiobooks include textbooks and other literature titles.

Now more than 4,500 students in 165 Denver Public Schools will have access to audiobook technology due to a partnership with Learning Ally and a grant from The Denver Foundation.

The number of students enrolled in the Learning Ally program is expected to reach 5,200 students this year and 85 percent of Denver Public Schools are currently enrolled in the Learning Ally program.
Lou Salza's insight:

I LOVE this! Kudos to Denver and Learning Ally!!--Lou

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Measuring What Matters in Admission - Independent Ideas Blog @NAISnetwork @HeatherHoerle

Measuring What Matters in Admission - Independent Ideas Blog @NAISnetwork @HeatherHoerle | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
There is no doubt that the continued measurement of cognitive skills for academic preparedness will remain part of a student’s application to independent schools, yet SSATB’s trustees agree with the Think Tank’s thesis and have funded a pilot project to develop a tool for character assessment. We expect our research work will demonstrate that each student’s social/emotional qualities, habits of mind, and intrapersonal biases for certain types of action are important for their success not only in our schools — but in college and in life. Presently, SSATB and a group of 32 pilot schools are developing with ETS a character skills assessment to be used in the independent school admission process – with a pilot test launching this May. We’re looking at methodologies that will not allow our assessment to be easily faked, coached, or "gamed." We are excited about the future possibilities inherent in pairing the SSAT with a suite of character assessment tools that can provide schools a more comprehensive student profile.
 
Scholar Robert Sternberg reminds us: "Traditional standardized tests, and even school grades, give us good information about some valued skills of students, but practically no information about other valued skills. If we wish to develop students who will be the active citizens and future leaders of tomorrow, we need to measure a broader range of skills important to future success — not just the memory and analytical skills measured by standardized tests, but also creative, practical, and wisdom‐based skills."
Lou Salza's insight:

I applaud and support the move towards assessments in independent school admission that look at the qualities of character that we know contribute to leadership, resilience, engaged citizenship, life and career success. Kudos to Heather Hoerle and the SSAT 'Think Tank on the Future of Assessment'. This is where all independent schools ought to be putting their oars in the water!--Lou

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 16, 11:20 AM

This is exactly what the old "Emotional Growth" residential schools were focusing on back in the 80s and 90s.  Its a concept that was inherent in the McGuffy readers of the 19th century.  As stated here, the concept just makes sense and the task is to "modernize" it into sophisticated tools. -Lon

Lou Salza's comment, April 16, 11:27 AM
Lon, I loved the comment you made! Still have the McGuffey readers on my shelf at school. I browse them often and wonder what happened to our focus on character as the foundation on which schools ought to be building learning communities.
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TY! @nytdavidbrooks for: The Moral Bucket List @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @cdcowen

TY! @nytdavidbrooks for: The Moral Bucket List @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Commencement speakers are always telling young people to follow their passions. Be true to yourself. This is a vision of life that begins with self and ends with self. But people on the road to inner light do not find their vocations by asking, what do I want from life? They ask, what is life asking of me? How can I match my intrinsic talent with one of the world’s deep needs?

Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
Lou Salza's insight:

Lovely, important piece! I married one of the people Brooks describes: 

 

".....who radiates an inner light. These people can be in any walk of life. They seem deeply good. They listen well. They make you feel funny and valued. You often catch them looking after other people and as they do so their laugh is musical and their manner is infused with gratitude. They are not thinking about what wonderful work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all."


I met with a group of seniors last week and was asked what tools or techniques I used as a dyslexic in the 1970s to get through college. 

I told them: "Marry the right person!"

--Lou


 

 

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USDOE names colleges facing heightened financial scrutiny from federal officials | @insidehighered @lawrenceschool

USDOE names colleges facing heightened financial scrutiny from federal officials | @insidehighered @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Education on Tuesday, for the first time, named most of the hundreds of colleges whose federal aid it has restricted because of concerns about their finances or compliance with federal requirements.
The department released a partial list of the nearly 560 institutions that, as of March 1, were subject to the financial restrictions known as heightened cash monitoring. Most of the colleges -- 487 institutions -- were on the lower level of scrutiny, and 69 were subject to the higher, more stringent restrictions.
“We feel that by issuing this list today we’re doing what’s right for good government and transparency’s sake,” said Ted Mitchell, the under secretary of education.
The department continued to keep secret the identities of 21 of the 69 colleges that it placed on the highest level of monitoring, which means that department employees manually approve every dollar that flows to an institution. Nearly all of those unidentified colleges were on that status because a federal audit of the institution resulted in “severe findings.”  
“We have ongoing investigations at each of those institutions and we fear that, at this point, releasing those names would impede the progress of our investigation,” Mitchell said in an interview. He said the names of those colleges would eventually be released as the investigations are completed.
Lou Salza's insight:

Add a visit to the college business office when you visit college campuses and dorms this summer!  Check out the links at this website to get more information about 560 colleges on the FDOE's watch list.---Lou   

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6 Google Chrome Apps for Students with Dyslexia @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa

6 Google Chrome Apps  for Students with Dyslexia @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Today, students with learning disabilities and differences, such as dyslexia, have many assistive technology (AT) options to help them with the demands of reading and writing. Desktop software and apps for mobile devices have been providing academic support for several years, and now Google’s Chromebook and Chrome Web browser have joined the array of effective accommodations.

The first article in this series gave an overview of how Chrome can aid students with dyslexia, while the second part looked at specific AT-related extensions that can be added to the Chrome browser. This third article will explore Chrome apps that can be utilized to compose and better understand written materials.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Jamie! We are grateful to you at Lawrence School for your advice and perspectives!!--Lou

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How America's Education Model Kills Creativity and Entrepreneurship @Forbes @lawrenceschool

How America's Education Model Kills Creativity and Entrepreneurship @Forbes @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The current model of education in the United States is stifling the creative soul of our children. While this is troubling for a variety of reasons, it also has significant economic consequences for the future of our country. America has long been unique because of its remarkable ingenuity, innovative capacity [...]
Lou Salza's insight:

This is a message with which we are all too familiar. So when will college admissions offices take the handcuffs off secondary schools and give teachers and students a real shot at real learning and authentic assessment?--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"....In an effort to combat this dual trend of decreasing student creativity and start up decline, America needs to invest in empowering the next generation with entrepreneurial thinking. A vibrant, innovative society is predicated on a creative mindset. It’s also based on an awareness of the opportunities that entrepreneurship provides both for individuals and for society, the encouragement to pursue them and the skills and belief that you too can be an innovative member of society.

There are promising signs on the horizon. Recently the Miller Center at the University of Virginia in partnership with the Batten Institute for Entrepreneurship and Innovation completed itsMilstein Commission on Entrepreneurship, co-chaired by Steve Case and Carly Fiorina. They propose the creation of a national K-12 entrepreneurship competition and related curriculum to expose students at an early age and across a wide variety of socioeconomic backgrounds to the accessibility of entrepreneurship and the merits of taking risks and building something from the ground up even when success is not guaranteed. By taking their shot at pitching a novel idea, venture or solution, this program will give young people the simple but critical awareness Steve Jobs spoke about, that they too can change and influence things, and make the world better for future generations. Indeed, if our kids develop that self-awareness and internal locus of control, it will be easy to regain our hope for the future.

Raul O. Chao is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business

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Lawrence School:Nick's Story @lawrenceschool @benpowers @cdcowen @ATDyslexia @ryan_masa @claudiadaggett

Lawrence School is an independent, K-12 coeducational day school serving students with learning differences and attention deficits. With our small classes, unique curricula, and hands-on learning opportunities, we provide students from nearly 70 communities and 10 counties throughout northeast Ohio with an exceptional educational experience that teaches to their distinct learning styles, ignites their potential, and inspires academic and social success.
Lou Salza's insight:

NIck represents a Lawrence Lower School student with attention challenges. This is the second video in our "reimagine school" communications campaign to draw attention to our kids, their families and the work of Lawrence School in northeast Ohio.--Lou 

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TY! @ATDyslexia 4 Intro 2:Google's Dyslexia Resources | @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @_CLCook

TY! @ATDyslexia 4 Intro 2:Google's Dyslexia Resources |   @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @_CLCook | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This is the first article in a four-part series exploring how Google has entered the AT world and become a great option for students with dyslexia. It will explain the basics of how Google’s Chrome browser can be used in various ways to help with reading and writing. The second part will look at specific Chrome extensions that work in conjunction with various websites and the education tools of Google Drive. The third part will explain specific Chrome apps that can accommodate language difficulties. Finally, the fourth part will explore add-ons to Google Docs that can help with various writing and study skills.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Jamie!

Lawrence now has introduced Chromebooks into our middle school. The google environment offers several robust strategies and tools to support students with dyslexia. As you point out, these are not device specific.  The bottom line has always been that technology is not a solution--it is a strategy or a tool.  At the same time, when we have the right strategy and the rights tools, the solution is within our grasp!--Lou

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​​​Trustee, Headmistress, mentor & friend Nurturing Resilience: NAIS Blog @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool

​​​Trustee, Headmistress, mentor & friend Nurturing Resilience: NAIS Blog @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Resilience isn't a race; we all make progress over the course of our lives.  When we cultivate resilience in ourselves, we help our students and children do the same.  Celebrate success but do not fear failure. It's not the mistake that matters; it's what we learn from it as we move forward that counts. 
Lou Salza's insight:

Great piece--great advice! Thank you Ann! Ann is the Head of Laurel School for Girls where our grand-daughter Elise is in 1st grade. She is the Director and co-founder of the Center for Research on Girls at Laurel. She serves on the Lawrence School Board of Trustees and she is a voice of wisdom and sagacity in the Cleveland Council of Independent School. She is a treasured colleague, a mentor and a friend. --Lou

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When Struggling With Dyslexia Makes You A Better Entrepreneur @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

When Struggling With Dyslexia Makes You A Better Entrepreneur @cdcowen @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In addition to having Jaybird Bluetooth earbuds around his neck at all times, Keiser employs Voice Dream to read his emails and news articles, along with Evernote for retaining information and Audible for consuming books. "The speed at which I’m now reading through my ears, which felt like cheating at times, is transformational," says Keiser. "I used to give up most of Sunday to read the things I couldn’t read the rest of the week. I’m so thankful, because what I got back was time with my children."
Lou Salza's insight:

News flash: in School at least it is not dyslexia we  struggle with exclusively but with the poor, anachronistic, one size fits all  design of school practices and requirements. Later in life away from school we are liberated and we convince ourselves that the struggle bestowed gifts. If dyslexia is a gift,  every student in our fourth grade and I want to return it.  --Just sayin'- Lou

 

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@ATDyslexia Assistive Tech Basics for Students with Dyslexia | Articles | Noodle @cdcowen

@ATDyslexia  Assistive Tech Basics for Students with Dyslexia | Articles | Noodle @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Incorporating AT into Schools
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires Individualized Education Plan (IEP) teams in public schools to consider assistive technology as an accommodation for students with dyslexia, and an AT evaluation may be needed to determine the best technology tools for the needs of particular students. In addition, AT accommodations can be part of students’ 504 plans. Once dyslexic students enter college, they are responsible for seeking out their own AT accommodations, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protects their rights to those accommodations. For more information on the legal aspects of incorporating AT into the education of dyslexic students, please explore Wrightslaw, a comprehensive website led by special education attorney Peter Wright.

In addition to the legal process, parents and teachers can work together for the good of students with dyslexia. Most teachers enter the profession because they care about kids and have a true interest in helping them succeed. Unfortunately, many educators do not have a complete knowledge of assistive technology and how it can help their students with reading and writing difficulties. Parents and teachers can learn about AT together, share ideas, and strategize the best ways to implement them in schools.

Another thing to consider is that private schools that specialize in educating students with dyslexia often incorporate assistive technology into their academic programs. In many cases, they have specialists who train students to use AT and help teachers incorporate the tools into their classrooms.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you for this great article, Jamie Martin! Excellent overview of the way that technology can level the academic playing field, and align strengths so that weaknesses become irrelevant. AT shifts the focus from compliance with the more mechanical requirement for student learning and achievement, by removing the impediments to production. Let's all aim for new school designs that eliminate the need for accommodation! --Lou

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The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool

The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated. Keith Oatley, an emeritus professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto (and a published novelist), has proposed that reading produces a vivid simulation of reality, one that “runs on minds of readers just as computer simulations run on computers.” Fiction — with its redolent details, imaginative metaphors and attentive descriptions of people and their actions — offers an especially rich replica. Indeed, in one respect novels go beyond simulating reality to give readers an experience unavailable off the page: the opportunity to enter fully into other people’s thoughts and feelings.

The novel, of course, is an unequaled medium for the exploration of human social and emotional life. And there is evidence that just as the brain responds to depictions of smells and textures and movements as if they were the real thing, so it treats the interactions among fictional characters as something like real-life social encounters.

Lou Salza's insight:

And it bears repeating that there are three different ways to read: with our eyes, with our ears, and with our finger tips.  Technology allows us to combine these in ways that should remove most traditional barriers to literacy. While I struggled with reading, and I am still fatigued easily by eye reading, I love what reading does to me. It enhances experience, deepens understanding of the world and history, and broadens horizons- all while sitting in a comfortable chair!---Lou 

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 7, 3:58 PM

When I was in the classroom, I always had the dream of teaching a whole history course primarily through novels of various eras.  I guess I was on to something all those years ago. :) -Lon

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The Play That Took Me Inside My Autistic Son's Head @lhlandini @SuzannaJemsby @GarhettWagers @ryan_masa

The Play That Took Me Inside My Autistic Son's Head @lhlandini @SuzannaJemsby @GarhettWagers @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

For 16 years we’ve been locked outside my firstborn son’s head. Sam is a boy, fast becoming a man, whose sense of the world around him is defined by his own fixed point on the autism spectrum. He can rarely conceive what’s expected of him in social situations, and by that I mean a setting as routine as a family dinner with his parents and his two brothers—let alone an environment as demanding as high school, or the adult world.

But for two hours recently, we got a glimpse at some of the chaos that might be raging in there, thanks to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time—the innovative, high-tech theatrical adaptation of Mark Haddon’s 2003 best-selling novel of the same name. The play, which was recently nominated for six Tony Awards, came to New York from London’s National Theatre in a production directed by Marianne Elliott (War Horse). It takes an immersive approach to communicating the internal state of its hero, Christopher. Like Sam, Christopher is an autistic teenage boy who’s often perplexed by the day-to-day demands of human interaction.

Lou Salza's insight:

Amazing book--and an absolutely astounding play.  Riveting performance, insightful adaptation of the book and deeply sensitive treatment of autism. If you are in NYC see it!--Lou

 

Excerpt: "...The production team set the show inside a big black box. (It’s the same team that premiered the play in London, with a different cast.) The three walls facing the audience are lit to look like graph paper; letters and symbols and mathematic equations cascade across them, sometimes defying gravity, streaming up from the floor to the ceiling. When Christopher is distressed, electronic music pounds and seizure-inducing hot white lights flash..."

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Teacher Preparation | International Dyslexia Association @DDNJ12 @UnderstoodOrg @cdcowen @ryan_masa

Teacher Preparation | International Dyslexia Association @DDNJ12 @UnderstoodOrg @cdcowen @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) consistently finds that 35% of fourth graders in the United States are reading at a level that is below basic. Research has demonstrated that most reading difficulties can be resolved or diminished when reading is taught by a highly knowledgeable and skilled teacher.

The identification of individuals with dyslexia and other reading difficulties, and appropriate instruction by a well-trained teacher using a structured approach to teaching reading, has been a cornerstone of IDA since its beginning. The components of Structured Literacy are outlined in the IDA Knowledge and Practice Standards for Teachers of Reading. To ensure that teachers and specialists are appropriately trained, IDA reviews and accredits teacher training programs and will begin certifying individuals in 2016. For more information about the IDA Standards and credentialing, click here.

IDA views accreditation and certification as key strategies to change the way reading is taught in classrooms across America. Through accreditation and certification, IDA develops a direct line that connects teacher preparation programs to teacher competency and, in turn, to student achievement. IDA accredited programs produce highly knowledgeable and skilled teachers of reading who seek certification and positively impact reading achievement for all students.

Lou Salza's insight:

It will require comprehensive, cooperative efforts from state and local politicians, university schools of education, superintendents and administrators, parents and teachers to turn this shameful situation around.  Sen. Cassidy and Decoding Dyslexia are making great progress! 

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Peter Thiel: Asperger’s an advantage in Silicon Valley? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @dyslexicadv

Peter Thiel: Asperger’s an advantage in Silicon Valley? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @dyslexicadv | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In his 2014 book "Zero to One," Thiel and his co-author Blake Masters write: 

The hazards of imitative competition may partially explain why individuals with an Asperger's-like social ineptitude seem to be at an advantage in Silicon Valley today. If you're less sensitive to social cues, then you're less likely to do the same thing as everyone else around you. 

If you're interested in making things or programming computers, you'll be less afraid to pursue those activities single-mindedly and thereby become incredibly good at them. 

Then when you apply your own skills, you're a little less likely than others to give up your own convictions; this can save you from getting caught up in crowds competing for obvious prizes. 

Thiel certainly isn't alone in his thoughts on Asperger's. 

A movement called "neurodiversity" started to gain traction in the 1990s largely thanks to Australian sociologist Judy Singer.

Rather than taking autism, dyslexia, and other psychological profiles as pathologies that needed to be cured, neurodiversity considers them to be different modes of intelligence. 

So instead of being a liability, something like Asperger's could be an asset.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excellent article featuring mainstream market/venture 'experts' looking at so called learning differences as an asset in the marketplace.  We know that the impact of these conditions is context-specific. Individuals with high functioning autism are at a disadvantage in school where almost all the classroom and hallway environments require some fairly sophisticated social savvy. Yet in the lab, or the office where creativity is the focus, and laser focused  work needs to be done, the same school liability can become a workplace advantage. -- Lou

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Dyslexia Accommodations for College Exams - PSAT, SAT, and ACT @dyslexicadv @drseide @lawrenceschool

Dyslexia Accommodations for College Exams - PSAT, SAT, and ACT @dyslexicadv @drseide @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For those who wonder whether extended time for dyslexics students will create an unfair advantage over non-dyslexics, studies have shown that extended time does not provide any advantage to non-reading-impaired readers, but it does provide a more accurate assessment of the knowledge and thinking abilities of reading-impaired students.
Lou Salza's insight:

This article gives a substantive treatment of the issues and the remedies surrounding testing risks and solutions for those students with dyslexia. For those students who are refused accommodations because of fears that extra time gives a dyslexic an unfair advantage over none dyslexic peers, check out the Drs. Eide's excellent response:

 

"For those who wonder whether extended time for dyslexics students will create an unfair advantage over non-dyslexics, studies have shown that extended time does not provide any advantage to non-reading-impaired readers, but it does provide a more accurate assessment of the knowledge and thinking abilities of reading-impaired students...."

 

 

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ADHD Treatments for Children: Be Sure They Get What’s Best @lawrenceschool @HHSGov

ADHD Treatments for Children: Be Sure They Get What’s Best @lawrenceschool @HHSGov | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A lot of information on ADHD exists online and this can lead parents in different directions, unsure of what treatment is best for their child. The good news is that researchers are learning more about ADHD all the time. We know a lot more today about how to help children with ADHD thrive at home, at school, and socially with friends.
Most children with ADHD ages 4-17 are receiving either medication or behavioral therapy for the disorder. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) gives this advice to healthcare providers, psychologists, educators, and parents of children with ADHD:
For preschoolers ages 4-5 with ADHD, use behavioral therapy before medication.
For older children and teens with ADHD, use behavioral therapy along with medication.
Lou Salza's insight:

 How best to treat our young children with ADHD? I see so many links for programs that claim to "bust dyslexia" or  "balance brains" with no replicable research or real data to back up broad claims of success on poorly defined groups of children.

Here are some suggestions and resources from the researchers at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and  recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).  These are resources to keep parents headed in the direction that will get the best outcomes for their children while they resist the siren calls of unfounded claims and unproven methods.--Lou 

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Gifted and Dyslexic: Identifying and Instructing 2e Students @cdcowen @ryan_masa @lawrenceschool

Gifted and Dyslexic: Identifying and Instructing 2e Students @cdcowen @ryan_masa @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Twice exceptional students are often lost in the school or IEP system, have their talents neglected in favor of remediation, or confuse diagnosticians so they do not qualify for much needed differentiated, specialized instruction they need for their gifts and to address their dyslexia. Practitioners and clinicians agree that the needs of a gifted student with dyslexia are very different from the individual with dyslexia or giftedness alone. Intellectual giftedness can complicate the diagnosis of dyslexia such that (because of high IQ) a person may not be found eligible for special services. Moreover, a reading disability may hinder the development of an academic gift because of focusing on the disability and neglecting growth and challenge in the areas of giftedness.

Students who have both gifts and learning disabilities require a “dually differentiated program”: one that nurtures gifts and talents while providing appropriate instruction, accommodations, and other services for treating learning weaknesses. Unfortunately, research- based, well-defined, and prescribed practices for the 2e student with dyslexia are hard to find, and current practices vary widely.

Instruction for 2e students should be designed to develop higher-level cognitive functioning, or for their challenges–to develop basic skills (e.g. handwriting, reading, spelling, written expression, math computation). Otherwise, these students may be labeled average students or underachievers who simply need “to try harder.”
Lou Salza's insight:

2e students suffer disproportionately in our schools. Often well meaning parents and teachers pin the blame for underachievement in very bright students with dyslexia on lack of effort. Telling a 2e student struggling to keep up with the work in school to "try harder" not only unhelpful but damaging. This article offers a comprehensive look at serving 2e students in our schools and classrooms. --Lou

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"Voice of Literacy" - Literacy Lines @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @ryan_masa

"Voice of Literacy" - Literacy Lines @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I’d like to share a resource I recently found that archives podcasts related to literacy. On the Voice of Literacy site, Dr. Betsy Baker (Associate Professor of Literacy studies at the University of Missouri) posts bi-weekly podcasts of interviews of researchers as they discuss the implications of their literacy research.  Most podcasts range from 10 to …
Lou Salza's insight:

Joan Sedita is the founding partner of Keys to Literacy and author of the Keys to Literacy programs and routines. She is an experienced educator, nationally recognized speaker and teacher trainer. She has worked for over 35 years in the literacy education field and has presented to thousands of teachers and related professionals at schools, colleges, clinics, and professional conferences.

In this post Joan shares recently discovered, excellent resources from the University of Missouri and Dr. Betsey Baker. When Joan Sedita speaks, I listen!--Lou

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ReImagine School: Nicole's Story - Lawrence School @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers @LeapofReason

We are excited to share two new Lawrence School videos we believe present a clear picture of the important work we do and the families we serve in a distinctive and, we hope, memorable way. Each acknowledges and explains the concerns and worries of our parents and students. Nicole's story describes and presents Lawrence's purpose (why we serve); our students and families (who we serve); a bit about our program (how we serve) and our unique place in the constellation of educational services in northeast Ohio (the Lawrence Advantage).  

Lou Salza's insight:

In an effort to educate our community about our students and our school, we have embarked on a communications campaign to highlight the experience of students with dyslexia ( Nicole) and students with ADHD ( Nick) before and after they arrive at Lawrence. ReImagine School!--Lou  

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New Approach to Designing Ed Tech @CAST_UDL @iplante @lawrenceschool @ryan_Masa @cdcowen

New Approach to Designing Ed Tech @CAST_UDL @iplante @lawrenceschool @ryan_Masa @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The crew at CAST felt that traditional lesson plans built around print were leaving too many kids out, frustrating some students while boring others.

So they flipped their approach. Rather than help individual students plug back into the classroom, they set out to transform the classroom itself. They built software and digital tools to pack lessons with flexibility, offering every student multiple ways to learn and to express that learning—including print, speech, graphics, music, and interactive games, among others. They called their new mission “universal design for learning,” and a movement was born. Spurred by the rapid advance of computers and broadband Internet in schools, UDL initiatives have sprung up in nearly every state in the last five years.
Lou Salza's insight:

Loved this post--CAST is once again blazing new trails.- Lou

 

Excerpt:

"Rose’s favorite new CAST projects is called Udio (the name’s a mash of UDL and studio), an online reading curriculum funded by the Department of Education. It’s aimed at kids in middle school, the grades where struggling readers start running into trouble in nearly every subject.

Standard reading supports focus on things like phonics and building vocabulary with simple sentences. The problem is that struggling readers aren’t the same as beginning readers. Research shows that these students feel a palpable sense of dread when asked to read a passage of text, measured as a physical stress reaction of sweaty palms and a rapid heart rate. “You realize, oh my God, these kids aren’t even in the same classroom. They’re in the savanna with hungry lions prowling, and you’re trying to teach them phonics,” says Rose.

“We’re not saying that intensive interventions for reading skills, like phonics, decoding, and fluency, aren’t needed,” adds Gabrielle Rappolt-Schlichtmann, CAST’s co-president and director of the Udio project. “But you can’t get traction with those skills unless you practice. And you have to practice with ardent intent. You have to want to do it.”

  
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Lawrence School: Re-Imagining School - YouTube @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

Students learn best when their differences are understood and accepted, when appropriate accommodations are made available and, most importantly, when their strengths as learners are defined, affirmed, and cultivated. Our approach – respecting differences and building on strengths – is vital for students who learn differently and may well serve as a successful model for educating all students, in all schools.
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 21, 4:42 PM

As Salza says, this ability to accommodate to individual student differences is not good just for student with learning differences, but to all students and the resources, technology and knowledge exists to do this in mainstream schools also. -Lon

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Learning Disabled or School Disabled? - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Ryan_Masa

Learning Disabled or School Disabled? - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Ryan_Masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
People readily accept that individuals can be reliably differentiated from each other based on fingerprints and DNA. Yet regardless of all that researchers have learned about the brain, educators continue to cling to the belief that it makes sense to treat children as though their brains are (or should be) the same -- identical motherboards fitted with identically stamped circuitry. We have built a system of schooling on the myth of the "normal" brain, the comfortable belief that normal people must all learn the same way, that education can be standardized --standardized curricula, standardized course loads, standardized requirements, standardized teaching methods and lessons, standardized tests, standardized expectations.

Alas, this model hasn't worked out very well. Each brain is a complex web of billions of neural networks, each a unique tapestry woven from different experiences, genetic combinations, and chemistry. Children come to school with profiles of cognitive strengths and weaknesses as different from one another as their fingerprints. As a result, they understand and wrestle with problems in many different ways. They need flexible environments that help them find their own path to learning and, ultimately, to meaningful work.

Stories abound of people who were labeled in school and tormented for having some form of abnormal LD and who became successful in careers in which their "disability" proved to be an asset: dyslexics whose different perceptual abilities suited them to careers in astrophysics, biology, engineering, physics, the arts, and mathematics. 
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Alden Blodget! I could not have said this better!--Lou

My favorite passage:

"....Many educators know that there is something wrong.  The recognition of "multiple intelligences" and different "learning styles" or "temperaments" has led to some "experiential education" and "differentiated instruction" (and, occasionally, to truly differentiated schools). But so far, these efforts seem little more than a bit of tinkering -- like Procrustes offering a choice of blankets. The system itself and the entrenched, faulty assumptions about how people learn remain unchanged. Diagnoses of learning disabilities continue to increase, and standardization marches on, right over my grandson....

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 11, 10:51 PM

Although I have not read his work extensively, Bernard Stiegler has some interesting and controversial ideas about learning disabilities such as ADD and ADHD. He sees it as less the person and more institutional and technological.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, March 13, 2:11 PM

This is a typical problem for the typical  bright RPS student.  To help see why,  read my new paper: Effects of Physical Rotational Movement Difference and Handwriting Position on Academic Achievement and Learning Disabilities was published in Vol. 6 No.3, 2015. The DOI is 10.4236/psych.2015.63024

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@Ryan_Masa How Did They Get Here? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

@Ryan_Masa How Did They Get Here? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In his latest book, How Did You Get Here? Students with Disabilities and Their Journeys to Harvard, Professor Thomas Hehir tackles a subject that has occupied much of his life’s work: ensuring access, inclusion, and opportunity for all students regardless of their diagnoses.
Lou Salza's insight:

The interesting thing to me about the title of this book is that it surfaces the assumptions we make about students very early on. Tom Hehir has put his finger on the larger question of not only how we define 'disability' at places like Harvard, but how narrowly we define success everywhere else in schools on the way to a place like Harvard. N.B. Test scores and grades inform but DO NOT DEFINE US.  ---Lou 

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