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Braingenie - Math and Science Practice

Braingenie - Math and Science Practice | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Braingenie is the Web's most comprehensive math and science practice site. Popular among educators and families, Braingenie provides practice and video lessons in more than 4,000 skills.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Lawrence Loop: David Flink at Lawrence on Sept. 9 author, LD advocate, & co-founder of Eye to Eye @bnpowers

Lawrence Loop: David Flink at Lawrence on Sept. 9 author, LD advocate, & co-founder of Eye to Eye @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

David Flink to Speak 
at Lawrence on Sept. 9
David Flink – author, LD advocate, social movement leader and co-founder of Eye to Eye – will present "Thinking Differently: Reframing Learning for a New Generation" at Lawrence Upper School on Wednesday, Sept. 9, from 7-8:30 p.m. as part of our free Community Education Series. For more information or to register, please point your browser to <lawrenceschool.org> 

Lou Salza's insight:

Don't miss the opportunity to hear David speak at Lawrence School! --Lou

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Earl Oremus:Why Wait for Failure? Early identification and intervention- @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers

Earl Oremus presented "Why Wait for Failure? Early Intervention and Identification for Reading Problems" at Lawrence Upper School on Aug. 18, 2015.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Earl! Wonderful summary of the research supporting early identification and intervention to prevent reading failure in our schools! --Lou

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Teachers as Learners: 6 Professional Development Ideas by @amanda_Ronan @lawrenceschool | Edudemic

Teachers as Learners: 6 Professional Development Ideas by @amanda_Ronan @lawrenceschool | Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Teachers are skilled learners. As professionals, they’re required to continue studying and improving their craft. Schools design professional develop to help their faculty grow, but sometimes that PD is misaligned with teachers’ goals and classroom needs. By allowing teachers the option to choose how they’ll grow, differentiated PD options make continuous learning engaging and meaningful. We’re curious about what options your school gives you for PD. Comment below or reach out on Twitter or Facebook and let us know.
Lou Salza's insight:

Terrific article! These ideas are inexpensive and potentially transformative particularly for teachers hungry to expand their tool box, and network, or dabble in using current research. Book Clubs, Mentorship, observations of colleagues' classrooms and Lesson study are my top picks!-Lou  

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12 Essential Android Apps for Dyslexic Students: TY! Jamie Martin, @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool

12 Essential Android Apps for Dyslexic Students: TY! Jamie Martin, @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
While many assistive technology (AT) professionals (myself included) have extolled the virtues of Apple’s lineup of iPhones and iPads, the truth is that phones and tablets running on Google’s Android operating system also provide excellent options for students and adults with dyslexia. Even though Apple’s iOS operating system features unparalleled accessibility features, Android devices can be loaded with enough AT-related apps to make them quality assistive devices. The following apps, found and downloaded from the Google Play Store, should be considered essential tools for dyslexic Android users.
Lou Salza's insight:

Love this guy! Thank you Jamie!!-Lou

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Helping Students with Dyslexia Achieve Independence TY @ATDyslexia @DyslexiaBarton @lawrenceschool

Helping Students with Dyslexia Achieve Independence TY @ATDyslexia @DyslexiaBarton @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Learning to Self-Advocate
Jamie: Coaching students to be strong self-advocates is a large part of assistive technology training. At this point, there are so many AT options that students need to be able to identify which tools work for them and be able to communicate that to others. More often than not, they know more about the technology than most of the people around them, so they need to be able to explain why they need AT to be successful and independent. That becomes especially true if they decide to go to college, where they no longer have IEPs that spell out their accommodations. When I am working with high school students, I like to make sure they are ready to advocate for themselves by the time graduation rolls around. You work with younger kids — do you foster self-advocacy skills at that age?

Kyle: My students are 10 and 11 years old, but they need those skills for the same reasons you mentioned for high school students. The untidy reality is that my students also have to know how to advocate for access to their tools. I am sure that you have encountered the wide range of teacher philosophies about assistive tech. You hear everything from, “If he uses speech-to-text he will never learn to write.” Or, “Audiobooks will prevent her from learning how to decode words.” I have witnessed teachers resist even the most minor adjustments, like refusing to offer extra time to finish an assessment because they think it will give a child an unfair advantage over other students in the class. I am always prepared to debate these issues, but that is not as helpful as giving my students the language — and the permission — to address it themselves. That kind of coaching requires a kind of nuance which can be more challenging for younger children, but the earlier they learn how to explain and advocate, the smoother their school road will be.
Lou Salza's insight:

Great conversation! Thank you Kyle Redford and Jamie Martin for insights into the importance of assistive technology and self advocacy for those who walk in dyslexia nation!

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Everyone Told Me Not to Become a Heart Surgeon. I Did It Anyway. @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @cdcowen

Everyone Told Me Not to Become a Heart Surgeon. I Did It Anyway. @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It was the late 1960s. I’d finished medical school, and I was planning to go into cardiac surgery. Everybody tried to talk me out of it. Looking back, I can understand why. It had been less than 20 years since the development of cardio-pulmonary bypass made it possible for surgeons to perform complex open heart procedures. Cardiac surgery was a rigorous and fast-moving discipline. The work would be hard, the hours would be long, and the learning curve was steeper than Mount Washington.

And I had a few things going against me. For one, there was my academic record. I’d worked hard as undergraduate, but long days and nights in the library produced little more than a collection of Cs. Twelve of 13 medical schools rejected me. I was the least talented person in my residency. That’s why people told me that it would be a mistake for me to go into cardiac surgery.
Lou Salza's insight:

Toby Cosgrove is the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic. He holds 30+ patents in cardiac medicine and leads a $7+billion organization that has become a model for controlling the increase in medical costs while delivering excellent care.  Did I mention that he has dyslexia?--Lou 

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How to get Assistive Touch on iPhone @lawrenceschool

How to get Assistive Touch on iPhone @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Someday your iPhone home button will be damaged or not work at the speed you want. At that point it will be time to adjust the centre button on your iPhone and use the assistive touch button. Here we explain how to activate Assistive Touch to adjust the centre button of the iPhone. Enabling Assistive Touch makes a semi-transparent button appear. Tapping this button will allow you to access the same functions as the home button on your iPhone does.

Lou Salza's insight:

Remarkable web site for all those like me who need a step by step walk through that I can repeat! There are screens for many different issues: how to unfreeze a frozen iPhone, how to speed up a slow phone etc., --Lou

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Processing Speed: What You Need to Know by Kate Kelly @UnderstoodOrg @lawrenceschool

Processing Speed: What You Need to Know by Kate Kelly @UnderstoodOrg @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Slow processing speed isn’t a learning or attention issue on its own. But it can contribute to learning and attention issues like ADHD, dyslexia, dyscalculia and auditory processing disorder.

It can also impact executive functioning skills. These are the thinking skills that help kids plan, set goals, respond to problems and persist on tasks. Kids who are slow to process information may have trouble getting started on assignments, staying focused and monitoring how well they’re doing.
Lou Salza's insight:

Concise, accurate description of how students experience slow processing speed. Our students who struggle with learning differences like dyslexia & ADHD and slow processing can be supported in any school by offering opportunities for project based learning that de-emphasizes time constraints and instead rewards thoughtful, longer term assignments that aim for deeper understanding.  Assistive technology can assist with production. --Lou

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Harvard researchers have mapped the five child-rearing techniques you need to raise kind kids @lawrenceschool

Harvard researchers have mapped the five child-rearing techniques you need to raise kind kids @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Ask parents how important it is to instill kindness in their kids, and most will rank it high: even as their very top priority, according to Harvard researchers.
But children surveyed by the university’s Making Caring Common (pdf) project said, overwhelmingly, that they were getting a different message. The researchers spoke with 10,000 kids at a range of middle and high schools in the US in 2013 to 2014. Nearly 80% said that their parents taught them that personal happiness and high achievement were more important than caring for other people.
But all is not lost. The study makes some recommendations for raising children that genuinely believe kindness is important:
Lou Salza's insight:

An important article posted on her fb page by my wife, Dell. Thanks Dell!-Lou 

 

Excerpt:

1) Give kids opportunities to practice being kind.

Children aren’t born with an innate ability to act kindly, but learn it in the same way as they might pick up an instrument or a language. Daily opportunities to practice—something as simple as helping another child with homework—can make a difference.

 

2) Children need to learn two important skills. 

These will help kids build a wider “circle of concern,” the researchers say. Children need to learn to “zoom in” on individuals, and truly listen to them. They also need to be able to “zoom out” to see a bigger picture—effectively, learning to put human experience in context.

 

3) Kids need role models. 

That doesn’t mean being perfect parents. It means working on empathy, and demonstrating concern and sympathy so that children can be exposed to it.

 

4) Help children manage destructive feelings. 

Shame, anger, and jealousy can override the intention to be kind. Kids need to know that such feelings are normal, but can be addressed in different ways. Children are “moral philosophers,” the researchers write. “When adults spark children’s thinking with ethical questions they put issues of injustice on children’s radar and help children learn how to weigh their various responsibilities to others and themselves.”

 

5) Adults should stop passing the buck. 

Parents worry about children’s moral state, the researchers note, but it’s hard to find adults who admit they might be part of the problem. Adults need to interrogate the messages they’re sending, and ask themselves: what values am I really instilling?

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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed @lawrenceschool

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that.

Earlier, well-designed tests of simple and relatively inexpensive growth-mindset interventions had surprisingly shown improvements in students’ grades over weeks or months. For instance, promising results from one famous experiment – an eight-session workshop in 91 seventh graders in a New York City school – led psychology researchers Carol Dweck and Lisa Blackwell to start up Mindset Works, a company that offers a computer-based program called Brainology.
Lou Salza's insight:

I recommend Dweck's book - Lou

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, May 20, 7:13 PM

We already know that a positive attitude can change accomplishment.  This article makes intuitive sense that ability can increase with proper exposure to a positive mindset.  -Lon

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, May 22, 10:33 PM
Good information for bright students who are not doing well
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Collateral Sorrow @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool @HawkenSchool

Collateral Sorrow @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool @HawkenSchool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In the grip of grief. These are not my boys. This is not my school, my story. Yet, once more, I am holding hurt -- my own, the hurt girls in my school feel, the hurt braided with fear that every parent feels when adolescent illusions of invincibility are dashed.
Lou Salza's insight:

Our school communities share so many close connections: We may serve in one school and send our children to another.  We are joined in the triumphs and tragedies of our communities. In this remarkable essay, Ann Klotz, Head of Laurel School for Girl's writes her grief our grief--at the loss of two boys at Hawken School last week. Wherever we serve, whoever we are, these are our boys--this is our loss. I found her willingness and capacity to share her grief a comfort. Thank you Ann! --Lou

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PEERS Program @lawrenceschool Thanks To Generous Grant

PEERS Program @lawrenceschool Thanks To Generous Grant | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Finally, there was a structured, systematic and hierarchical method for helping socially isolated and socially neglected students find their way through the maze of interpersonal connections and relationships. The science of making and keeping friends would no longer remain a mystery."

The results after the first year of the PEERS program at Lawrence have been profound. Students have been engaged in the lessons and practicing skills at home and in social situations.

In fact, the program has been so successful that Lawrence will be offering a special summer session of PEERS - which is open to Lawrence School students and non-students alike in Grades 7 and 8 - starting next month. For more information, please see our Summer Programs page.

"Parents have noted that they have begun to see their children interacting with peers in ways they have not seen before," Culp said. "One parent notes that her daughter now has 35-minute phone conversations with friends that she initiates. This is a child who never would have considered calling a friend to talk before the PEERS program."

Lou Salza's insight:

For many years since I read Lev Vygotsky in graduate school, I have understood that learning is socially mediated. In my work with students over the decades, I understand that  the experience that most students have in school is essentially  social. When students are rejected by their peers, isolated from the social interactions that make life in school meaningful, everyone suffers: the child, the parents, and the school. The PEERS  program out of UCLA is a structured, systematic, multisensory approach to making and keeping friends.  We have seen remarkable results already.  We are grateful to The Burton D. Morgan Foundation, for their support to our school as we have learned to provide this program to our students and to our parents!--Lou

 

 

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Caveat Emptor! TY-- @pameladel 4 Negative Sides of Technology | Edudemic @lawrenceschool

Caveat Emptor! TY-- @pameladel 4  Negative Sides of Technology | Edudemic @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We live in a high tech world—with high tech classrooms. We embrace the benefits of using iPads during class, integrating tweets during presentations, and teaching students while using smart TVs. We know the many benefits of incorporating technology while teaching, such as adding diversity to lessons, increasing student interaction, and to bringing new perspectives and knowledge to the class.

But there can be a negative side resulting from inappropriate or overuse of technology, and that negative side can have serious and long-term consequences. To make the best out of tools of technology, teachers and parents must also recognize their downsides and how to avoid them.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excellent reminder that adults-parents and teachers must keep up with our children's use of technology. The article details results of research and offers several ways that we can help our kids avoid the negative impacts and benefit from the tools now available-- Lou

 

Excerpt:

Monitor the use of technology. Whether you’re a parent, teacher, or both, make sure you know how your kids are using technology.  Many classroom computers have restrictions on which sites can be used. If yours doesn’t, consider adding them or checking the search history to know what your students are doing. For parents, some mobile phone plans offer family-friendly options that let parents restrict calls or texts during parent-established times.Teach responsible usage. We don’t suggest ignoring what technology can offer. Instead, talk with students about establishing their Internet footprint, and the long-range consequences of putting inappropriate information into cyberspace.  Encourage students to discuss tricky situations they may encounter online and help them work to a positive resolution.Be familiar with technology. Keep up with what those young people are into. Vine, Snapchat, or whatever the current online trend is, stay current so you can recognize and head off any problems early on.Use classroom technology intentionally. It’s easy to allow technology (i.e. videos, movies) to take precedence in a lesson. Be sure to use these tools to augment—not substitute for—your teaching.Offer alternatives to technology. Give students an assignment that requires reading a hard copy of a material. Task them with interviewing each other—in person—instead of texting questions. Conduct class outside where you can sit and discuss a topic without the usual distractions.
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The Real Neuroscience of Creativity By Scott Barry Kaufman @lawrenceschool @ryan_Masa @cdcowen

The Real Neuroscience of Creativity By Scott Barry Kaufman @lawrenceschool @ryan_Masa @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
So yea, you know how the left brain is really realistic, analytical, practical, organized, and logical, and the right brain is so darn creative, passionate, sensual, tasteful, colorful, vivid, and poetic?

No.

Just no.

Stop it.

Please.
Lou Salza's insight:

Of course we know that our brains do not adhere to the latest pop psychology interpretations of brain function and yes, we need to be wary of the tendency we have in schools to gravitate towards oversimplified explanations and answers to complex problems and questions. Beware of 'brain scams'

I thoroughly enjoyed this article and what it teaches about creativity:

 

Excerpt:

".....The investigation of large-scale brain networks does appear to be a more promising research direction than focusing entirely on the left and right hemispheres; the creative process appears to involve the dynamic interplay of these large-scale networks. Also, converging research findings do suggest that creative cognition recruits brain regions that are critical for daydreaming, imagining the future, remembering deeply personal memories, constructive internal reflection, meaning making, and social cognition.

 

Nevertheless, much more research is needed that investigates how the brain creates across different domains, species, and timescales.

 

It's an exciting time for the neuroscience of creativity, as long as you ditch outdated notions of how creativity works. This requires embracing the messiness of the creative process and the dynamic brain activations and collaborations among many different brains that make it all possible."

By Scott Barry Kaufman 

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House group asks agency to spell out resources for dyslexic students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

House group asks agency to spell out resources for dyslexic students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“On behalf of children with dyslexia and other learning disabilities in our districts, we request that the U.S. Department of Education Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS) issue guidance to states and school districts regarding the use of the term ‘dyslexia,' " the congressmen said in the letter.

“Despite the prevalence of dyslexia among students, parents nationwide have discovered that some states and school districts will not include the word “dyslexia” in a students’ Individualized Educational Program (IEP),” the letter said. “In many cases, parents have been told that their state does not 'recognize' dyslexia; and instead only uses the term ‘specific learning disability.’ Families in our congressional districts rely on access to a high-quality education for their children with dyslexia. We look forward to your ensuring that the millions of students with dyslexia receive the evidence-based instruction and interventions needed to succeed in school and life.”
Lou Salza's insight:

Can't wait for the response!--Lou

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Carolyn D Cowen's curator insight, August 5, 5:28 PM

Can't wait for the response!--Lou

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TY!4 helpful advice @_jculp " 5 Tips For Battling Back-To-School Jitters" @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

TY!4 helpful advice @_jculp " 5 Tips For Battling Back-To-School Jitters"  @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....Each year, as the “Back-To-School” ads begin to flood TV and radio and fill my mailbox, I think about the kids who are not looking forward to new school supplies and a fresh start. While I am hopeful that most, if not all, of our Lawrence Lions are looking forward to an exciting and positive year ahead, I recognize that some – particularly those who are making big transitions – may be a little less than excited at the prospect.
For some – like our rising seventh graders – it means coming from the small, intimate environment of our Lower School into a much larger Upper School with many more classmates. In other cases, this year’s transition means a new grade level and new teachers. And while that may not seem like a major transition, new teachers can often mean big changes.
For still others, the change is huge – coming from another school in a far-away community to Lawrence. This, of course, means everything is new; from what to wear, how to get home from school, to everything in between; including making new friends..." By Jason Culp, Head, Lawrence Upper School

Lou Salza's insight:

Wonderfully written, helpful advice from our Head of Lawrence Upper school! Jason's advice is well worth following to reassure students that parents and school staff are in their corner, paying attention to scaffolding confidence and supporting their success.--Lou

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David Flink Headlines 2015 Community Ed Series @lawrenceschool @E2ENational @DaveFlink @bnpowers

David Flink Headlines 2015 Community Ed Series @lawrenceschool @E2ENational  @DaveFlink @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

David Flink To Headline 2015 Community Education Series
6/25/2015
An appearance by nationally recognized LD advocate and author David Flink headlines a high-profile lineup scheduled for the 2015 Community Education Series at Lawrence School, the school announced today.

The popular series returns for its third consecutive year this fall.
 
Flink, who is the co-founder of Eye to Eye and author of the book, Thinking Differently, will speak at Lawrence Upper School on Sept. 9 in the second session of a four-part series that also features recently retired Headmaster of Marburn Academy Earl Oremus (Aug. 18); psychologist, author and teacher Dr. Lisa Damour (Oct. 20); and an assistive technology presentation by the tech staff of Lawrence School (Nov. 11).
 
All four sessions are open to the public and free of charge. Each event will be held at Lawrence Upper School, located at 10036 Olde Eight Road in Sagamore Hills, and run from 7-8:30 p.m. The free Community Education Series aims to advance Lawrence School’s vision of serving as a regional resource for the northeast Ohio community.

To register for the Community Education Series, please visit www.lawrenceschool.org/communityed. ;

Lou Salza's insight:

We are thrilled to have David Flink, Earl Oremus, Lisa Damour and our own Learning and Assistive Technology faculty reaching out to families in NEOH to promote greater understanding of students with learning differences! Please join us!-Lou

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Our emotions: The Science of ‘Inside Out’ By D. KELTNER & P. EKMAN @nytimes @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

Our emotions: The Science of ‘Inside Out’  By D. KELTNER & P. EKMAN @nytimes @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Inside Out” is about how five emotions — personified as the characters Anger, Disgust, Fear, Sadness and Joy — grapple for control of the mind of an 11-year-old girl named Riley during the tumult of a move from Minnesota to San Francisco. (One of us suggested that the film include the full array of emotions now studied in science, but Mr. Docter rejected this idea for the simple reason that the story could handle only five or six characters.)

Riley’s personality is principally defined by Joy, and this is fitting with what we know scientifically. Studies find that our identities are defined by specific emotions, which shape how we perceive the world, how we express ourselves and the responses we evoke in others.

But the real star of the film is Sadness, for “Inside Out” is a film about loss and what people gain when guided by feelings of sadness. Riley loses friends and her home in her move from Minnesota. Even more poignantly, she has entered the preteen years, which entails a loss of childhood.

We do have some quibbles with the portrayal of sadness in “Inside Out.” Sadness is seen as a drag, a sluggish character that Joy literally has to drag around through Riley’s mind. In fact, studies find that sadness is associated with elevated physiological arousal, activating the body to respond to loss. And in the film, Sadness is frumpy and off-putting. More often in real life, one person’s sadness pulls other people in to comfort and help.


Those quibbles aside, however, the movie’s portrayal of sadness successfully dramatizes two central insights from the science of emotion.

Lou Salza's insight:

Interesting commentary about the important role emotions play in our lives--particularly as we develop deeper understanding about how our students experience our schools and our classrooms. 

My take away? Let's lead with the heart--then get our minds due north using a backbone to confront the adult-driven politics that have riven our public schools then take the stand in education that puts students first in every consideration.  - Lou

 

 

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Two-Column Notes - YouTube @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @EHSSouthport @cdcowen

When students take notes, comprehension is enhanced as they process, organize and restate information in their own words. Listen to Joan Sedita, founder of Keys to Literacy describe the format of two-column note taking. This is an excerpt from The Key Comprehension Routine Professional Development training for teachers. Visit keystoliteracy.com to learn more

Lou Salza's insight:

Joan Sedita has provided some of the best professional development we have undertaken at Lawrence School to improve faculty capacity and student outcomes in vocabulary and comprehension. This explanation of two column notes is a keeper!--Lou

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Dyslexia is no bar to Formula 1 racing champions @lawrenceschool

Dyslexia is no bar to Formula 1 racing champions @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Being a dyslexic might be a problem when reading in the classroom, but it hasn’t stopped some of Britain’s greatest racing drivers from achieving success – men like Jackie Stewart, Nigel Mansell and Johhny Herbert. Stewart believes that it ultimately played a key role in his success on track.
Canadian F1 writer and friend of JA on F1, Jeff Pappone investigates:
Dyslexics are always finding work arounds for things that come easily for others, Stewart insisted that his disability led him down paths that others might ignore, something that gave him extra ammo to help defeat his rivals.
“The dyslexic cannot think like the ‘clever’ folk, so they have to be thinking out of the box and if they are doing that, they are finding new ways of doing things,” said Stewart who was one of the first F1 drivers to cultivate sponsorship.
“When I was a racing driver, I had a really good communication system with my engineers. I could paint pictures of how my car was behaving, what it felt like, how it did this or that, and I could explain it graphically and make them feel it, so they had a better chance of thinking ‘Hey, I never thought of that.’”
Lou Salza's insight:

Stewart has been an eloquent spokesperson for the impact of dyslexia since he brought his own son to the US in the 1980's for an opportunity to attend the Landmark school for dyslexics in Massachusetts. I love Stewart's description of his own thought process when confronting problems. --Lou

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How Browns' rookie Xavier Cooper conquered learning differences @ryan_masa @lawrenceschool

How Browns' rookie Xavier Cooper conquered learning differences @ryan_masa @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In the classroom, however, he was vulnerable, an easy target for schoolmates brave enough to make comments about his academic problems. Cooper didn't begin taking special education classes until his freshman year yet he knew issues existed.

What some students could read and comprehend in 30 minutes could take him two hours. Like many youngsters with learning disabilities, Cooper's shortcomings didn't become apparent until he reached middle school.

"You could give him a paragraph to read aloud and he could read it fine," said his mother, Dawn, a social worker. "But when you asked him what it meant, he'd have to re-read it a couple of times to understand it."

Dawn and her husband, Louis, who works for the Port of Tacoma, have master's degrees. Their daughter, Keysha, owns a degree in sociology. The Coopers understand the value of education. They used sports as "hooks" to keep their son engaged academically.

Kathleen Miller, a special education teacher at Wilson, said Louis was particularly vigilant with the boy everyone called "X." It wasn't easy. Cooper was initially embarrassed about requiring three special education classes even though some of his teammates also were enrolled in them.

Barbs from other students were hurtful.

"I was definitely teased a lot," Cooper said. "They would tell me, 'You're getting a pass because you're an athlete' and 'you're dumb, why are you in the same (learning disabled) class all day?'"
Lou Salza's insight:

Cooper discovered he needs to move  or at least 'do something' in order to retain what he wanted to learn. The importance of kinesthetic reinforcement needs more attention from schools. All the best to X and the Browns! --Lou

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Schools Must Learn From LA's iPad Debacle | WIRED @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @@ATDyslexia

Schools Must Learn From LA's iPad Debacle | WIRED @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @@ATDyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
According to Horn, who also is author of Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools, Los Angeles is a classic case of a school district getting caught up in the ed tech frenzy without fully thinking through why technology is important in the first place.

“LA is emblematic of a problem we’re seeing across the country right now,” he says. “Districts are starting with the technology and not asking themselves: ‘What problem are we trying to solve, and what’s the instructional model we need to solve it?’ and then finding technology in service of that.”
Lou Salza's insight:

Let's not blame the technology. This was a failure of management and leadership.  The program was not aligned with a mission, mission was not targeted to solve a particular problem, and there were no internal controls that guaranteed prudent use of resources and  cost controls. No one devised a way to collect data and evaluate effectiveness.  The problem is not with the iPads! This is a a classic, massive failure of execution at  leadership and management levels.--Lou

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Mississippi lawmaker pushes for dyslexia awareness @lawrecneschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa

Mississippi lawmaker pushes for dyslexia awareness @lawrecneschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Rep. Steven Palazzo and his wife, Lisa, recognized about three years ago that their youngest son, Bennett, was struggling with reading so they hired tutors, but nothing seemed to work.

They had the fourth-grader tested recently and learned he had dyslexia, a learning disability that involves difficulty learning to read.

“When he realized he wasn’t slow or dumb, his attitude changed. He knows he’s smart and knows there’s a way out,” said Palazzo, a Republican representing Mississippi’s 4th District. “I just wish we could have caught this when he was in first or second grade.’’

Palazzo and Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana are on a mission to raise awareness about dyslexia. Cassidy’s daughter, Kate, also is dyslexic.
Lou Salza's insight:

It always boils down to something personal. That's ok! We'll take it, support their initiatives and hope for legislative change!-Lou

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@DDxOH Tell Your Story! Decoding Dyslexia OH #DecodingDyslexia @cdcowen

@DDxOH Tell Your Story! Decoding Dyslexia OH #DecodingDyslexia @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Equality is about sameness, it promotes fairness and justice by giving everyone the same thing. BUT it can only work if everyone starts from the same place. In the example on the left, equality only works if everyone is the same height.

Equity is about fairness, it’s about making sure people get access to the same opportunities. In the example on the right, because of varying height, each person gets what he needs to remove barriers to participation.

~ Source Unknown.
Lou Salza's insight:

Eventually we need to reimagine school--and redesign learning environments to eliminate the need for accommodations. --Lou

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2015’s Top Education Technology Trends | Edudemic @lawrenceschool

2015’s Top Education Technology Trends | Edudemic @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
6 Important Trends in Education Technology
A number of experts weighed in on the six technology trends that are making the biggest impact on education. If you read the report itself, you’ll see not only a description of what the trend is (which we’ve summarized below), but also a few examples of institutions or organizations that have already embraced it.
Lou Salza's insight:

It is all here: innovation, collaboration, sharing content and data, assessment, open source tools and resources!--Lou

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