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26 Facts About Finland's Unorthodox Education System consistently ranked # 1 internationally

26  Facts About Finland's Unorthodox Education System consistently ranked # 1 internationally | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It puts the rest of the world to shame. (If the US wants to regain global competitiveness we need REAL education reform. Finland's model works.

Since it implemented huge education reforms 40 years ago, Finland's school system has consistently come at the top for the international rankings for education systems.
So how do they do it...."

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Schools Must Learn From LA's iPad Debacle | WIRED @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @@ATDyslexia

Schools Must Learn From LA's iPad Debacle | WIRED @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @@ATDyslexia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
According to Horn, who also is author of Blended: Using Disruptive Innovation to Improve Schools, Los Angeles is a classic case of a school district getting caught up in the ed tech frenzy without fully thinking through why technology is important in the first place.

“LA is emblematic of a problem we’re seeing across the country right now,” he says. “Districts are starting with the technology and not asking themselves: ‘What problem are we trying to solve, and what’s the instructional model we need to solve it?’ and then finding technology in service of that.”
Lou Salza's insight:

Let's not blame the technology. This was a failure of management and leadership.  The program was not aligned with a mission, mission was not targeted to solve a particular problem, and there were no internal controls that guaranteed prudent use of resources and  cost controls. No one devised a way to collect data and evaluate effectiveness.  The problem is not with the iPads! This is a a classic, massive failure of execution at  leadership and management levels.--Lou

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Mississippi lawmaker pushes for dyslexia awareness @lawrecneschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa

Mississippi lawmaker pushes for dyslexia awareness @lawrecneschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Rep. Steven Palazzo and his wife, Lisa, recognized about three years ago that their youngest son, Bennett, was struggling with reading so they hired tutors, but nothing seemed to work.

They had the fourth-grader tested recently and learned he had dyslexia, a learning disability that involves difficulty learning to read.

“When he realized he wasn’t slow or dumb, his attitude changed. He knows he’s smart and knows there’s a way out,” said Palazzo, a Republican representing Mississippi’s 4th District. “I just wish we could have caught this when he was in first or second grade.’’

Palazzo and Republican Sen. Bill Cassidy of Louisiana are on a mission to raise awareness about dyslexia. Cassidy’s daughter, Kate, also is dyslexic.
Lou Salza's insight:

It always boils down to something personal. That's ok! We'll take it, support their initiatives and hope for legislative change!-Lou

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@DDxOH Tell Your Story! Decoding Dyslexia OH #DecodingDyslexia @cdcowen

@DDxOH Tell Your Story! Decoding Dyslexia OH #DecodingDyslexia @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Equality is about sameness, it promotes fairness and justice by giving everyone the same thing. BUT it can only work if everyone starts from the same place. In the example on the left, equality only works if everyone is the same height.

Equity is about fairness, it’s about making sure people get access to the same opportunities. In the example on the right, because of varying height, each person gets what he needs to remove barriers to participation.

~ Source Unknown.
Lou Salza's insight:

Eventually we need to reimagine school--and redesign learning environments to eliminate the need for accommodations. --Lou

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2015’s Top Education Technology Trends | Edudemic @lawrenceschool

2015’s Top Education Technology Trends | Edudemic @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
6 Important Trends in Education Technology
A number of experts weighed in on the six technology trends that are making the biggest impact on education. If you read the report itself, you’ll see not only a description of what the trend is (which we’ve summarized below), but also a few examples of institutions or organizations that have already embraced it.
Lou Salza's insight:

It is all here: innovation, collaboration, sharing content and data, assessment, open source tools and resources!--Lou

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"I Don't Think We Have a Program for Dyslexia" - Sec. Ed. Arne Duncan @lawrenceschool @dyslexicadv

http://Community.DyslexicAdvantage.org "Why the heck don't you have a Special Program for Dyslexia?" - Senator Bill Cassidy (R-LA). 

Lou Salza's insight:

I found this interchange between Arne Duncan and Senator Cassidy fascinating.  Senator Cassidy of the Bipartisan Dyslexia Congress is flabbergasted: If Dyslexia is 80% of LDs and comprise at least half of students can't read, “Why the heck Don’t you have a specific program for Dyslexia?”

Senator Bill Cassidy is the parent of a child with dyslexia and is also a physician.

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, May 12, 5:19 PM

So if the federal government isn't doing it, it isn't happening?  -Lon

Bruce Haines's curator insight, May 13, 8:55 AM

Lou's on to something here. One of the most wonderful things I've observed in the past few years is the speed and persistence with which the grassroots dyslexia lobby has grown in so many state, and is now having an even greater impact with the federal government.

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Teen Mental Health Tops Parents' Concerns, Yet Few Get Treated @lawrenceschool

Teen Mental Health Tops Parents' Concerns, Yet Few Get Treated @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“Everybody is in denial about depression and anxiety,” Dr. Aaron Krasner, the adolescent transitional living service chief at Silver Hill, told Yahoo. “So it makes sense to me that until the sh-- is really hitting the fan, parents and kids aren’t interested in talking about these problems. In some ways, parents don’t want to know and would rather do anything than acknowledge that their kid has a problem.” 

Mental health issues are prevalent among teens: The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) cited four million children and adolescents in the United States suffer from a serious mental disorder, with 21 percent of children ages 9 to 17 having a diagnosable mental or addictive disorder. NAMI added when these disorders are left untreated, teens use more health care services and face higher health care costs when they become adults. And for teens whose issues stem from bullying, they’re more likely to suffer from mental health problems later in life.
Lou Salza's insight:

Concerns about depression and anxiety are especially relevant to families of children and adolescents who struggle in school with learning differences. Isn't it time we all gave ourselves permission to speak more openly, work more cooperatively, and implement programs more thoughtfully than we are right now?---Lou

 

My favorite passage: 

"......parents need to start thinking of mental health issues, like anxiety and depression, as the psychiatric illnesses they are, not “character flaws.” Mental disorders are neurological problems, and there are treatments available for teens to reduce their symptoms."

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@Learning_Ally Denver Schools give 80K audiobooks to struggling students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

@Learning_Ally Denver Schools give 80K audiobooks to struggling students @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
DENVER - Denver Public Schools gave 80,000 audiobooks to students struggling with dyslexia.

Dyslexia and other reading disabilities affect one in every five Colorado students according to Learning Alley, a national nonprofit organization who helps students who are blind, visually impaired, or dyslexic.

Students will be able to access 80,000 books on their computers, tablets, smartphones, iPods, or other devices. The audiobooks include textbooks and other literature titles.

Now more than 4,500 students in 165 Denver Public Schools will have access to audiobook technology due to a partnership with Learning Ally and a grant from The Denver Foundation.

The number of students enrolled in the Learning Ally program is expected to reach 5,200 students this year and 85 percent of Denver Public Schools are currently enrolled in the Learning Ally program.
Lou Salza's insight:

I LOVE this! Kudos to Denver and Learning Ally!!--Lou

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Measuring What Matters in Admission - Independent Ideas Blog @NAISnetwork @HeatherHoerle

Measuring What Matters in Admission - Independent Ideas Blog @NAISnetwork @HeatherHoerle | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
There is no doubt that the continued measurement of cognitive skills for academic preparedness will remain part of a student’s application to independent schools, yet SSATB’s trustees agree with the Think Tank’s thesis and have funded a pilot project to develop a tool for character assessment. We expect our research work will demonstrate that each student’s social/emotional qualities, habits of mind, and intrapersonal biases for certain types of action are important for their success not only in our schools — but in college and in life. Presently, SSATB and a group of 32 pilot schools are developing with ETS a character skills assessment to be used in the independent school admission process – with a pilot test launching this May. We’re looking at methodologies that will not allow our assessment to be easily faked, coached, or "gamed." We are excited about the future possibilities inherent in pairing the SSAT with a suite of character assessment tools that can provide schools a more comprehensive student profile.
 
Scholar Robert Sternberg reminds us: "Traditional standardized tests, and even school grades, give us good information about some valued skills of students, but practically no information about other valued skills. If we wish to develop students who will be the active citizens and future leaders of tomorrow, we need to measure a broader range of skills important to future success — not just the memory and analytical skills measured by standardized tests, but also creative, practical, and wisdom‐based skills."
Lou Salza's insight:

I applaud and support the move towards assessments in independent school admission that look at the qualities of character that we know contribute to leadership, resilience, engaged citizenship, life and career success. Kudos to Heather Hoerle and the SSAT 'Think Tank on the Future of Assessment'. This is where all independent schools ought to be putting their oars in the water!--Lou

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, April 16, 11:20 AM

This is exactly what the old "Emotional Growth" residential schools were focusing on back in the 80s and 90s.  Its a concept that was inherent in the McGuffy readers of the 19th century.  As stated here, the concept just makes sense and the task is to "modernize" it into sophisticated tools. -Lon

Lou Salza's comment, April 16, 11:27 AM
Lon, I loved the comment you made! Still have the McGuffey readers on my shelf at school. I browse them often and wonder what happened to our focus on character as the foundation on which schools ought to be building learning communities.
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TY! @nytdavidbrooks for: The Moral Bucket List @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @cdcowen

TY! @nytdavidbrooks for: The Moral Bucket List @lawrenceschool @ryan_masa @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Commencement speakers are always telling young people to follow their passions. Be true to yourself. This is a vision of life that begins with self and ends with self. But people on the road to inner light do not find their vocations by asking, what do I want from life? They ask, what is life asking of me? How can I match my intrinsic talent with one of the world’s deep needs?

Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
Lou Salza's insight:

Lovely, important piece! I married one of the people Brooks describes: 

 

".....who radiates an inner light. These people can be in any walk of life. They seem deeply good. They listen well. They make you feel funny and valued. You often catch them looking after other people and as they do so their laugh is musical and their manner is infused with gratitude. They are not thinking about what wonderful work they are doing. They are not thinking about themselves at all."


I met with a group of seniors last week and was asked what tools or techniques I used as a dyslexic in the 1970s to get through college. 

I told them: "Marry the right person!"

--Lou


 

 

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USDOE names colleges facing heightened financial scrutiny from federal officials | @insidehighered @lawrenceschool

USDOE names colleges facing heightened financial scrutiny from federal officials | @insidehighered @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON -- The U.S. Department of Education on Tuesday, for the first time, named most of the hundreds of colleges whose federal aid it has restricted because of concerns about their finances or compliance with federal requirements.
The department released a partial list of the nearly 560 institutions that, as of March 1, were subject to the financial restrictions known as heightened cash monitoring. Most of the colleges -- 487 institutions -- were on the lower level of scrutiny, and 69 were subject to the higher, more stringent restrictions.
“We feel that by issuing this list today we’re doing what’s right for good government and transparency’s sake,” said Ted Mitchell, the under secretary of education.
The department continued to keep secret the identities of 21 of the 69 colleges that it placed on the highest level of monitoring, which means that department employees manually approve every dollar that flows to an institution. Nearly all of those unidentified colleges were on that status because a federal audit of the institution resulted in “severe findings.”  
“We have ongoing investigations at each of those institutions and we fear that, at this point, releasing those names would impede the progress of our investigation,” Mitchell said in an interview. He said the names of those colleges would eventually be released as the investigations are completed.
Lou Salza's insight:

Add a visit to the college business office when you visit college campuses and dorms this summer!  Check out the links at this website to get more information about 560 colleges on the FDOE's watch list.---Lou   

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6 Google Chrome Apps for Students with Dyslexia @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa

6 Google Chrome Apps  for Students with Dyslexia @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Today, students with learning disabilities and differences, such as dyslexia, have many assistive technology (AT) options to help them with the demands of reading and writing. Desktop software and apps for mobile devices have been providing academic support for several years, and now Google’s Chromebook and Chrome Web browser have joined the array of effective accommodations.

The first article in this series gave an overview of how Chrome can aid students with dyslexia, while the second part looked at specific AT-related extensions that can be added to the Chrome browser. This third article will explore Chrome apps that can be utilized to compose and better understand written materials.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Jamie! We are grateful to you at Lawrence School for your advice and perspectives!!--Lou

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How America's Education Model Kills Creativity and Entrepreneurship @Forbes @lawrenceschool

How America's Education Model Kills Creativity and Entrepreneurship @Forbes @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The current model of education in the United States is stifling the creative soul of our children. While this is troubling for a variety of reasons, it also has significant economic consequences for the future of our country. America has long been unique because of its remarkable ingenuity, innovative capacity [...]
Lou Salza's insight:

This is a message with which we are all too familiar. So when will college admissions offices take the handcuffs off secondary schools and give teachers and students a real shot at real learning and authentic assessment?--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"....In an effort to combat this dual trend of decreasing student creativity and start up decline, America needs to invest in empowering the next generation with entrepreneurial thinking. A vibrant, innovative society is predicated on a creative mindset. It’s also based on an awareness of the opportunities that entrepreneurship provides both for individuals and for society, the encouragement to pursue them and the skills and belief that you too can be an innovative member of society.

There are promising signs on the horizon. Recently the Miller Center at the University of Virginia in partnership with the Batten Institute for Entrepreneurship and Innovation completed itsMilstein Commission on Entrepreneurship, co-chaired by Steve Case and Carly Fiorina. They propose the creation of a national K-12 entrepreneurship competition and related curriculum to expose students at an early age and across a wide variety of socioeconomic backgrounds to the accessibility of entrepreneurship and the merits of taking risks and building something from the ground up even when success is not guaranteed. By taking their shot at pitching a novel idea, venture or solution, this program will give young people the simple but critical awareness Steve Jobs spoke about, that they too can change and influence things, and make the world better for future generations. Indeed, if our kids develop that self-awareness and internal locus of control, it will be easy to regain our hope for the future.

Raul O. Chao is an Associate Professor at the University of Virginia Darden School of Business

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Lawrence School:Nick's Story @lawrenceschool @benpowers @cdcowen @ATDyslexia @ryan_masa @claudiadaggett

Lawrence School is an independent, K-12 coeducational day school serving students with learning differences and attention deficits. With our small classes, unique curricula, and hands-on learning opportunities, we provide students from nearly 70 communities and 10 counties throughout northeast Ohio with an exceptional educational experience that teaches to their distinct learning styles, ignites their potential, and inspires academic and social success.
Lou Salza's insight:

NIck represents a Lawrence Lower School student with attention challenges. This is the second video in our "reimagine school" communications campaign to draw attention to our kids, their families and the work of Lawrence School in northeast Ohio.--Lou 

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New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed @lawrenceschool

New Research: Students Benefit from Learning That Intelligence Is Not Fixed @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Even a one-time, 30-minute online intervention can spur academic gains for many students, particularly those with poor grades. The premise is that these positive effects can stick over years, leading for example to higher graduation rates; but long-term data is still needed to confirm that.

Earlier, well-designed tests of simple and relatively inexpensive growth-mindset interventions had surprisingly shown improvements in students’ grades over weeks or months. For instance, promising results from one famous experiment – an eight-session workshop in 91 seventh graders in a New York City school – led psychology researchers Carol Dweck and Lisa Blackwell to start up Mindset Works, a company that offers a computer-based program called Brainology.
Lou Salza's insight:

I recommend Dweck's book - Lou

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, May 20, 7:13 PM

We already know that a positive attitude can change accomplishment.  This article makes intuitive sense that ability can increase with proper exposure to a positive mindset.  -Lon

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, May 22, 10:33 PM
Good information for bright students who are not doing well
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Collateral Sorrow @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool @HawkenSchool

Collateral Sorrow @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool @HawkenSchool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In the grip of grief. These are not my boys. This is not my school, my story. Yet, once more, I am holding hurt -- my own, the hurt girls in my school feel, the hurt braided with fear that every parent feels when adolescent illusions of invincibility are dashed.
Lou Salza's insight:

Our school communities share so many close connections: We may serve in one school and send our children to another.  We are joined in the triumphs and tragedies of our communities. In this remarkable essay, Ann Klotz, Head of Laurel School for Girl's writes her grief our grief--at the loss of two boys at Hawken School last week. Wherever we serve, whoever we are, these are our boys--this is our loss. I found her willingness and capacity to share her grief a comfort. Thank you Ann! --Lou

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PEERS Program @lawrenceschool Thanks To Generous Grant

PEERS Program @lawrenceschool Thanks To Generous Grant | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Finally, there was a structured, systematic and hierarchical method for helping socially isolated and socially neglected students find their way through the maze of interpersonal connections and relationships. The science of making and keeping friends would no longer remain a mystery."

The results after the first year of the PEERS program at Lawrence have been profound. Students have been engaged in the lessons and practicing skills at home and in social situations.

In fact, the program has been so successful that Lawrence will be offering a special summer session of PEERS - which is open to Lawrence School students and non-students alike in Grades 7 and 8 - starting next month. For more information, please see our Summer Programs page.

"Parents have noted that they have begun to see their children interacting with peers in ways they have not seen before," Culp said. "One parent notes that her daughter now has 35-minute phone conversations with friends that she initiates. This is a child who never would have considered calling a friend to talk before the PEERS program."

Lou Salza's insight:

For many years since I read Lev Vygotsky in graduate school, I have understood that learning is socially mediated. In my work with students over the decades, I understand that  the experience that most students have in school is essentially  social. When students are rejected by their peers, isolated from the social interactions that make life in school meaningful, everyone suffers: the child, the parents, and the school. The PEERS  program out of UCLA is a structured, systematic, multisensory approach to making and keeping friends.  We have seen remarkable results already.  We are grateful to The Burton D. Morgan Foundation, for their support to our school as we have learned to provide this program to our students and to our parents!--Lou

 

 

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Caveat Emptor! TY-- @pameladel 4 Negative Sides of Technology | Edudemic @lawrenceschool

Caveat Emptor! TY-- @pameladel 4  Negative Sides of Technology | Edudemic @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We live in a high tech world—with high tech classrooms. We embrace the benefits of using iPads during class, integrating tweets during presentations, and teaching students while using smart TVs. We know the many benefits of incorporating technology while teaching, such as adding diversity to lessons, increasing student interaction, and to bringing new perspectives and knowledge to the class.

But there can be a negative side resulting from inappropriate or overuse of technology, and that negative side can have serious and long-term consequences. To make the best out of tools of technology, teachers and parents must also recognize their downsides and how to avoid them.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excellent reminder that adults-parents and teachers must keep up with our children's use of technology. The article details results of research and offers several ways that we can help our kids avoid the negative impacts and benefit from the tools now available-- Lou

 

Excerpt:

Monitor the use of technology. Whether you’re a parent, teacher, or both, make sure you know how your kids are using technology.  Many classroom computers have restrictions on which sites can be used. If yours doesn’t, consider adding them or checking the search history to know what your students are doing. For parents, some mobile phone plans offer family-friendly options that let parents restrict calls or texts during parent-established times.Teach responsible usage. We don’t suggest ignoring what technology can offer. Instead, talk with students about establishing their Internet footprint, and the long-range consequences of putting inappropriate information into cyberspace.  Encourage students to discuss tricky situations they may encounter online and help them work to a positive resolution.Be familiar with technology. Keep up with what those young people are into. Vine, Snapchat, or whatever the current online trend is, stay current so you can recognize and head off any problems early on.Use classroom technology intentionally. It’s easy to allow technology (i.e. videos, movies) to take precedence in a lesson. Be sure to use these tools to augment—not substitute for—your teaching.Offer alternatives to technology. Give students an assignment that requires reading a hard copy of a material. Task them with interviewing each other—in person—instead of texting questions. Conduct class outside where you can sit and discuss a topic without the usual distractions.
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The Difference Between IEPs and 504 Plans @lawrenceschool @UnderstoodOrg

The Difference Between IEPs and 504 Plans @lawrenceschool @UnderstoodOrg | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Both Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) and 504 plans can offer formal help for K–12 students with learning and attention issues. They’re similar in some ways but quite different in others. This chart compares them side-by-side to help you understand the differences.
Lou Salza's insight:

Useful, clear information!

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Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, May 6, 4:55 PM

Good information!

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The Play That Took Me Inside My Autistic Son's Head @lhlandini @SuzannaJemsby @GarhettWagers @ryan_masa

The Play That Took Me Inside My Autistic Son's Head @lhlandini @SuzannaJemsby @GarhettWagers @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

For 16 years we’ve been locked outside my firstborn son’s head. Sam is a boy, fast becoming a man, whose sense of the world around him is defined by his own fixed point on the autism spectrum. He can rarely conceive what’s expected of him in social situations, and by that I mean a setting as routine as a family dinner with his parents and his two brothers—let alone an environment as demanding as high school, or the adult world.

But for two hours recently, we got a glimpse at some of the chaos that might be raging in there, thanks to The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time—the innovative, high-tech theatrical adaptation of Mark Haddon’s 2003 best-selling novel of the same name. The play, which was recently nominated for six Tony Awards, came to New York from London’s National Theatre in a production directed by Marianne Elliott (War Horse). It takes an immersive approach to communicating the internal state of its hero, Christopher. Like Sam, Christopher is an autistic teenage boy who’s often perplexed by the day-to-day demands of human interaction.

Lou Salza's insight:

Amazing book--and an absolutely astounding play.  Riveting performance, insightful adaptation of the book and deeply sensitive treatment of autism. If you are in NYC see it!--Lou

 

Excerpt: "...The production team set the show inside a big black box. (It’s the same team that premiered the play in London, with a different cast.) The three walls facing the audience are lit to look like graph paper; letters and symbols and mathematic equations cascade across them, sometimes defying gravity, streaming up from the floor to the ceiling. When Christopher is distressed, electronic music pounds and seizure-inducing hot white lights flash..."

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Teacher Preparation | International Dyslexia Association @DDNJ12 @UnderstoodOrg @cdcowen @ryan_masa

Teacher Preparation | International Dyslexia Association @DDNJ12 @UnderstoodOrg @cdcowen @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) consistently finds that 35% of fourth graders in the United States are reading at a level that is below basic. Research has demonstrated that most reading difficulties can be resolved or diminished when reading is taught by a highly knowledgeable and skilled teacher.

The identification of individuals with dyslexia and other reading difficulties, and appropriate instruction by a well-trained teacher using a structured approach to teaching reading, has been a cornerstone of IDA since its beginning. The components of Structured Literacy are outlined in the IDA Knowledge and Practice Standards for Teachers of Reading. To ensure that teachers and specialists are appropriately trained, IDA reviews and accredits teacher training programs and will begin certifying individuals in 2016. For more information about the IDA Standards and credentialing, click here.

IDA views accreditation and certification as key strategies to change the way reading is taught in classrooms across America. Through accreditation and certification, IDA develops a direct line that connects teacher preparation programs to teacher competency and, in turn, to student achievement. IDA accredited programs produce highly knowledgeable and skilled teachers of reading who seek certification and positively impact reading achievement for all students.

Lou Salza's insight:

It will require comprehensive, cooperative efforts from state and local politicians, university schools of education, superintendents and administrators, parents and teachers to turn this shameful situation around.  Sen. Cassidy and Decoding Dyslexia are making great progress! 

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Peter Thiel: Asperger’s an advantage in Silicon Valley? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @dyslexicadv

Peter Thiel: Asperger’s an advantage in Silicon Valley? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @dyslexicadv | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In his 2014 book "Zero to One," Thiel and his co-author Blake Masters write: 

The hazards of imitative competition may partially explain why individuals with an Asperger's-like social ineptitude seem to be at an advantage in Silicon Valley today. If you're less sensitive to social cues, then you're less likely to do the same thing as everyone else around you. 

If you're interested in making things or programming computers, you'll be less afraid to pursue those activities single-mindedly and thereby become incredibly good at them. 

Then when you apply your own skills, you're a little less likely than others to give up your own convictions; this can save you from getting caught up in crowds competing for obvious prizes. 

Thiel certainly isn't alone in his thoughts on Asperger's. 

A movement called "neurodiversity" started to gain traction in the 1990s largely thanks to Australian sociologist Judy Singer.

Rather than taking autism, dyslexia, and other psychological profiles as pathologies that needed to be cured, neurodiversity considers them to be different modes of intelligence. 

So instead of being a liability, something like Asperger's could be an asset.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excellent article featuring mainstream market/venture 'experts' looking at so called learning differences as an asset in the marketplace.  We know that the impact of these conditions is context-specific. Individuals with high functioning autism are at a disadvantage in school where almost all the classroom and hallway environments require some fairly sophisticated social savvy. Yet in the lab, or the office where creativity is the focus, and laser focused  work needs to be done, the same school liability can become a workplace advantage. -- Lou

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Dyslexia Accommodations for College Exams - PSAT, SAT, and ACT @dyslexicadv @drseide @lawrenceschool

Dyslexia Accommodations for College Exams - PSAT, SAT, and ACT @dyslexicadv @drseide @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For those who wonder whether extended time for dyslexics students will create an unfair advantage over non-dyslexics, studies have shown that extended time does not provide any advantage to non-reading-impaired readers, but it does provide a more accurate assessment of the knowledge and thinking abilities of reading-impaired students.
Lou Salza's insight:

This article gives a substantive treatment of the issues and the remedies surrounding testing risks and solutions for those students with dyslexia. For those students who are refused accommodations because of fears that extra time gives a dyslexic an unfair advantage over none dyslexic peers, check out the Drs. Eide's excellent response:

 

"For those who wonder whether extended time for dyslexics students will create an unfair advantage over non-dyslexics, studies have shown that extended time does not provide any advantage to non-reading-impaired readers, but it does provide a more accurate assessment of the knowledge and thinking abilities of reading-impaired students...."

 

 

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ADHD Treatments for Children: Be Sure They Get What’s Best @lawrenceschool @HHSGov

ADHD Treatments for Children: Be Sure They Get What’s Best @lawrenceschool @HHSGov | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A lot of information on ADHD exists online and this can lead parents in different directions, unsure of what treatment is best for their child. The good news is that researchers are learning more about ADHD all the time. We know a lot more today about how to help children with ADHD thrive at home, at school, and socially with friends.
Most children with ADHD ages 4-17 are receiving either medication or behavioral therapy for the disorder. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) gives this advice to healthcare providers, psychologists, educators, and parents of children with ADHD:
For preschoolers ages 4-5 with ADHD, use behavioral therapy before medication.
For older children and teens with ADHD, use behavioral therapy along with medication.
Lou Salza's insight:

 How best to treat our young children with ADHD? I see so many links for programs that claim to "bust dyslexia" or  "balance brains" with no replicable research or real data to back up broad claims of success on poorly defined groups of children.

Here are some suggestions and resources from the researchers at the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and  recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).  These are resources to keep parents headed in the direction that will get the best outcomes for their children while they resist the siren calls of unfounded claims and unproven methods.--Lou 

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Gifted and Dyslexic: Identifying and Instructing 2e Students @cdcowen @ryan_masa @lawrenceschool

Gifted and Dyslexic: Identifying and Instructing 2e Students @cdcowen @ryan_masa @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Twice exceptional students are often lost in the school or IEP system, have their talents neglected in favor of remediation, or confuse diagnosticians so they do not qualify for much needed differentiated, specialized instruction they need for their gifts and to address their dyslexia. Practitioners and clinicians agree that the needs of a gifted student with dyslexia are very different from the individual with dyslexia or giftedness alone. Intellectual giftedness can complicate the diagnosis of dyslexia such that (because of high IQ) a person may not be found eligible for special services. Moreover, a reading disability may hinder the development of an academic gift because of focusing on the disability and neglecting growth and challenge in the areas of giftedness.

Students who have both gifts and learning disabilities require a “dually differentiated program”: one that nurtures gifts and talents while providing appropriate instruction, accommodations, and other services for treating learning weaknesses. Unfortunately, research- based, well-defined, and prescribed practices for the 2e student with dyslexia are hard to find, and current practices vary widely.

Instruction for 2e students should be designed to develop higher-level cognitive functioning, or for their challenges–to develop basic skills (e.g. handwriting, reading, spelling, written expression, math computation). Otherwise, these students may be labeled average students or underachievers who simply need “to try harder.”
Lou Salza's insight:

2e students suffer disproportionately in our schools. Often well meaning parents and teachers pin the blame for underachievement in very bright students with dyslexia on lack of effort. Telling a 2e student struggling to keep up with the work in school to "try harder" not only unhelpful but damaging. This article offers a comprehensive look at serving 2e students in our schools and classrooms. --Lou

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"Voice of Literacy" - Literacy Lines @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @ryan_masa

"Voice of Literacy" - Literacy Lines @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I’d like to share a resource I recently found that archives podcasts related to literacy. On the Voice of Literacy site, Dr. Betsy Baker (Associate Professor of Literacy studies at the University of Missouri) posts bi-weekly podcasts of interviews of researchers as they discuss the implications of their literacy research.  Most podcasts range from 10 to …
Lou Salza's insight:

Joan Sedita is the founding partner of Keys to Literacy and author of the Keys to Literacy programs and routines. She is an experienced educator, nationally recognized speaker and teacher trainer. She has worked for over 35 years in the literacy education field and has presented to thousands of teachers and related professionals at schools, colleges, clinics, and professional conferences.

In this post Joan shares recently discovered, excellent resources from the University of Missouri and Dr. Betsey Baker. When Joan Sedita speaks, I listen!--Lou

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