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6 Apps That Teach Math Concepts

6 Apps That Teach Math Concepts | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

 

"....For young learners, there are a plethora of apps out there to help learn how to count, and for older learners, often times a graphing calculator or scientific calculator app will do the trick. But what about all of those students in between?

You know, the ones who already know how to count, but have to learn a multitude of math concepts that most of their parents have long forgotten? We’re taking a look at 6 apps that are easy to use and teach more than just counting...."


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Working for a Literate Nation | LD Insights Blog | Blogs @LynPollard @LiterateNation

Working for a Literate Nation | LD Insights Blog  | Blogs @LynPollard @LiterateNation | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Parent Advocacy Boot Camps

How will parent advocates be trained? Literate Nation will be holding Literacy Boot Camps this Fall. The Boot Camps will provide resources and tools for people who want to work together toward changing the education system across America. Parents make up an important part of this group.

Join Me at Camp and Get Trained

As Parent Advocacy Manager with NCLD and also a Literate Nation partner, I’m excited to be part of this training process. I focus a lot of my time and energy on connecting parents to resources. I help parents find support as they navigate the advocacy journey for their children with learning and attention issues. Indeed, I’ve learned a lot on own journey as a parent advocate for my two children with learning and attention issues. Along the way, I’ve developed some tips and best practices that can help parents become more knowledgeable, collaborative and powerful advocates.

Lou Salza's insight:


"......Join me @LynPollard  at the Literate Nation Boot Camp in Williamsburg, Virginia on September 26-28 and join in virtually or in person in Denver, Colorado on October 17-19. I’ll be presenting at both Boot Camps. I’ll share how parents can make their advocacy most effective. Come and learn how to engage with the right people in the right places as you plan your legislative agenda. Get insight into the best ways to use social media to communicate with key decision makers and broadcast key messages.

We’re all working together toward a nation where every child has the opportunity to learn to read in an appropriate learning environment. I’m excited to help parents become a key part of the solution...."

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New smartphone app gives sight to the blind & boon to those with print challenges!

New smartphone app gives sight to the blind &  boon to those with print challenges! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The new app that allows blind people to listen to an audio readback of printed text is receiving rave reviews after its first day of availability and is being heralded as a life-changer by many people.
Blind people say the KNFB Reader app will enable a new level of engagement in everyday life, from reading menus in restaurants to browsing handouts in the classroom.

Lou Salza's insight:

It was only a matter of time that universal optical character recognition got folded into a smartphone app! The article details the history of OCR from the early days of the first "washing machine sized" device that cost $50,000 to the great news about the KNFB App. It is nimble, pricey & accurate;  --it will only get better and cheaper!--Lou

 

Excerpt:


"The $99 app is the result of a four decades-long relationship between the National Federation of the Blind and Ray Kurzweil, a well-known artificial-intelligence scientist and senior Google employee. According to its website, K-NFB Reading Technology Inc and Sensotec NV, a Belgium-based company, led the technical development of the app.
Kurzweil, who demonstrated the app on stage at the NFB’s annual convention in June, said it can replace a “sighted adviser”.
Taking advantage of new pattern recognition and image- processing technology as well as new smartphone hardware, the app allows users to adjust or tilt the camera, and reads printed materials out loud. People with refreshable Braille displays can now snap pictures of print documents and display them in Braille near-instantaneously, said NFB spokesman Chris Danielsen."

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Accredited Private School | Learning Differences | High Point, NC

Accredited Private School | Learning Differences | High Point, NC | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Noble Academy is a very caring, nurturing, and accepting environment for young people
to receive a quality education. Not only are academic needs met, but students who have suffered from low self-esteem and low self-confidence in the past find that Noble Academy provides a place where they can grow in these areas as well. When a student arrives at Noble Academy, they are greeted by a dedicated and committed faculty and staff who knows each student’s name and individual needs. Our direct instruction approach, attention to individual needs, and a strong emphasis on the enhancement of self-esteem allow students to build the confidence they need to maximize their potential.
Lou Salza's insight:

Check out this cool video that describes the differences the right school for a child can make: at this school, the difference is learning!--Lou

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Michigan State Univ: "Kids With ADHD need Exercise Before School" Question: -Don't we all!?

Michigan State Univ: "Kids With ADHD need Exercise Before School" Question:  -Don't we all!? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new study shows that offering daily before-school, aerobic activities to younger at-risk children could help reduce the symptoms of ADHD in the classroom and at home.
Lou Salza's insight:

Exercise is good for all kids--at any age and it is shameful that so many schools have sacrificed recess minutes and activity periods in  order to increase instructional time.

Our children should chase  playground ball not state assessment test scores! --Lou

 

Excerpt:

"....Over a 12-week period, Smith and Hoza studied about 200 early elementary school students ranging from kindergarten to second grade that either exhibited signs of ADHD or didn’t.

During the trial, students were randomly selected to participate in a group that completed moderate to vigorous physical activity each day before school, or a group that completed more sedentary classroom-type activities.

“Although our findings indicated that all participants showed improvements, children with ADHD risk receiving exercise benefited across a broader range of outcomes than those receiving the sedentary activities,” Smith says.

Smith indicates that further studies are needed to better understand the frequency and amount of physical activity that can provide benefits to children and adds that the effects of exercise may be different based on a child’s age.

“Despite the number of remaining questions, physical activity appears to be a promising intervention method for ADHD with well-known benefits to health overall,” he says.

“This gives schools one more good reason to incorporate physical activity into the school day.”..."

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Reduce Math Anxiety! four easy math tips 'add up' for kids with attention deficit

Reduce Math Anxiety! four easy math tips 'add up' for kids with attention deficit | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

These four easy math tips really add up for kids with attention deficit.

 1. Concept Over Memorization We learned with our daughters, who have dyscalculia, that memorization of math facts wasn’t going to happen. While they got some facts down pat, others never stuck. By teaching the principle or concept over memorization, we gave them the tools to solve larger math problems. 

Lou Salza's insight:

Common sense!--Lou


For example, my child may not know 8 x 9 off the top of her head, but she knows that 8 x 9 is the same as adding eight together nine times. She knows that she can add four more eights to 8 x 5, which she knows is 40, to come up with the answer. When a child struggles with math,understanding the concepts behind what she’s doing creates a foundation to build on.

2. Turn Off the Timer Pressure has never been a friend to the ADHD brain. Timed math fact tests are intimidating, causing more problems than they solve. My ADHDers complain all the time about how their brains freeze the minute the timer starts, making it impossible to think and be successful. Since memorization is the goal, turning off the timer and letting a child work at her own pace can make math facts more approachable. How to handle timed math fact tests is a great item for discussion and action in an IEP or 504 Plan.

3. Use Scratch Paper Wisely Turning lined paper sideways is a great way to make columns, which helps can make keeping larger math problems easier to work without getting lost in a sea of numbers. It especially helps students with dyslexia and dyscalculia, who often accidentally swap numbers a lot. We taught our kids from an early age to turn their lined paper sideways and to use the lines as columns. Laying out problems one number per column helps them solve math problems with more accuracy. Another option is to have your children create their own columns on blank paper before they start to work a problem.

4. Get Creative Every mind is different, so be creative in helping your child learn math. Triangle-shaped flash cards, while confusing to most of our kids, were a godsend to one of our daughters, who understood the concept of division better than she did multiplication. We used that strength to conquer her weaknesses. Colored markers, salt trays (where our tactile daughter could draw and work math problems in a tray of salt), making pictures out of numbers and math problems — don’t be afraid to think outside the box when conventional means fail.

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The Miracle that is Reading http://bodineschool.org/ - YouTube

Reading... While accepted as one of the most critical skills required to succeed, it has been terribly misunderstood for much too long..

Lou Salza's insight:

In 3 and a half minutes the folks at the http://bodineschool.org/ have summarized the complexity of learning how to read.--Lou

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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, September 17, 5:04 AM

EXACTLY!  Rocket Science....

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Spotlight on Dyslexia @Learning_Ally Keynote Speaker Dana Buchman, founder of Promise Project

Spotlight on Dyslexia @Learning_Ally  Keynote Speaker Dana Buchman, founder of Promise Project | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Acclaimed designer Dana Buchman, the keynoter for our upcoming Virtual Parent Conference, Spotlight on Dyslexia, is more than a fashion icon. Her experience as the mother of a daughter with learning differences fuels her passion for helping New York's inner city children gain access to reading.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt:

"......It’s not just a hobby for Buchman. She lives it. Nearly two decades ago, her eldest daughter, Charlotte, was diagnosed with learning disabilities.

Like any parent, Buchman wanted to know how to best help her child. What her doctor told her was a shock. Charlotte would best be served by attending a special private school – a school that serves the needs of children who learn differently...."

 

Spotlight on Dyslexia; A Virtual Parent Conference

Learning Ally is excited to announce Dana Buchman as our keynote speaker for our upcoming Virtual Parent Conference, Spotlight on Dyslexia. She’ll be joining 21 speakers who will delve into a wide range of topics — everything from IEPs to the emotional impacts of dyslexia. Save the date forDecember 5th, and learn more by visitingwww.LearningAlly.org/DyslexiaConference ;

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Full Committee Hearing - The Science of Dyslexia | Committee on Science - U.S. House of Representatives

Full Committee Hearing - The Science of Dyslexia | Committee on Science - U.S. House of Representatives | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

2318 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 | Sep 18, 2014 11:00am

Lou Salza's insight:
Great line up of experts on Panel # 2!--Lou Witnesses

Panel 1:

Hon. Bill Cassidy, Member, U.S. House of Representatives

Hon. Julia Brownley,  Member, U.S. House of Representatives

 

Panel 2:

Dr. Sally Shaywitz, Audrey G. Ratner Professor in Learning Development, Yale University School of Medicine and Co-Director, Yale Center for Dyslexia and Creativity, Yale University

Mr. Max Brooks, Author and Screenwriter

Ms. Stacy Antie, Parent and Advocate

Dr. Peter Eden, President, Landmark College

Dr. Guinevere Eden, Director, Center for the Study of Learning (CSL)  and Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Georgetown University Medical Center

 

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Linda Alexander's comment, September 13, 8:09 AM
The panel would be even better if you, Lou Salza, were included!
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For dyslexic students, are smart phones easier to read than books? | PBS NewsHour

For dyslexic students, are smart phones easier to read than books? | PBS NewsHour | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In a recent report for the National Science Foundation's "Science Nation," NewsHour Science correspondent Miles O'Brien explored how smart phones could help people who are dyslexic with their reading skills. Continue reading →
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Matthew Schneps for reminding us: 1.that we are not defined by those things with which we struggle, 2. That reading is not necessarily required for success and accomplishment or intelligence, 3. That technology, thoughtfully applied and integrated can help lower barriers to access and sometimes even level  the playing field!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

"Matthew Schneps holds a Ph.D. in physics but his success came with a certain measure of challenge. In addition to being an astrophysicist, Schneps is also dyslexic, which means he joins approximately 15 percent of Americans in a struggle to read.

“When I read, I find it’s very hard for me to kind of mentally lock on to the words,” Schneps said.

One thing has helped, however — Schnep’s smart phone, which helped him bridge the distance between his mind and the written word.

But was the device just helpful to him? Or it could it be helpful to others?

In a recent report for the National Science Foundation’s “Science Nation,” NewsHour Science correspondent Miles O’Brien covered Schneps’ exploration of the smart phone as a better reading device for students.

In an initial study, Schneps monitored 100 students with dyslexia while they read on smart phones to see if it improved their comprehension of science, technology, engineering and math lessons. While it aided some students, not all were impacted.

Schneps then turned to an eye tracker to see if students read faster on a smart phone or on a tablet. Overall, the students tested read faster on a smart phone.

Because people with dyslexia tend to get distracted by many words on one page, the key, according to Schneps, is only having two or three words in a line.

While Schneps still has to uncover why some students benefit from reading on devices over paper, he is committed to finding an alternative for scholars like himself.

“For me, the name of the game is to level the playing field,” he said. “To make reading something that’s not an impediment to success.”

Miles O’Brien has more on this story for the National Science Foundation* series “Science Nation.”

 

 

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Lawrence Loop: Community Education Series:Supporting vs. Enabling: Parenting the Child with Executive Function Deficits. Sept 23rd, 7-9pm Lawrence Upper School

Lawrence Loop: Community Education Series:Supporting vs. Enabling: Parenting the Child with Executive Function Deficits. Sept 23rd, 7-9pm Lawrence Upper School | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 Our next presentation is Tuesday, Sept. 23 from 7-8:30 p.m. (Q&A - 8:30-9 p.m.) at the Upper School and the topic will be Supporting vs. Enabling: Parenting the Child with Executive Function Deficits. 

The guest speaker is Dr. Cheryl Chase, and she will provide essential insight into how parents can balance support with accountability. All of our Community Education sessions are free and open to the public. Registration is required however, and you can do so by visiting the Community Education Series page of our website.

Lou Salza's insight:

Thanks to all those who attended the first part of our series, Helping Students With Learning Differences Make and Keep Friends, last month. The Garfield Theatre was nearly at full capacity as Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson from UCLA presented her transformative PEERS model of social skills intervention. We hope you found her research to be as fascinating as we did! A special thank you also goes out to our friends at The Burton D. Morgan Foundation, which made the special event possible!--Lou

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Transitioning from High School to College: What Students with Learning Differences Need to Succeed

Transitioning from High School to College: What Students with Learning Differences Need to Succeed | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The transition from high school to college is a big step for anyone. Here is an in-depth guide on what students with learning disabilities will need for a great transition to college.
Lou Salza's insight:

Important advice, cogent observations-- 'heads up' for our students headed to college--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

In college, the American Disabilities Act (ADA) takes over as the legal support for services. “[U]nder the ADA, colleges are required to provide fair and reasonable accommodations (reasonable is defined as anything that doesn’t alter the nature of the program) for any student who qualifies. Schools can and do interpret the law differently and they provide varied responses to meet the requirements,” notes the mother of a student with dyslexia.

Moreover, “most college professors are not trained in setting up environments for optimal learning,” notes Samantha Feinman, Director of New Frontiers in Learning, an organization that specializes in providing high quality education and learning support services to high schoolers and college students. Indeed, many professors are not trained teachers or instructors, and more often than not, they do not have training working with students with learning differences.

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How one student’s dyslexia changed a community PBS News Hour Sept. 3

How one student’s dyslexia changed a community PBS News Hour Sept. 3 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When Liz Woody’s son Mason was in third grade, he struggled to read basic words. After Woody moved Mason to a specialized school, she set out to transform techniques to reach struggling readers. John Tulenko of Learning Matters has the story. Continue reading →
Lou Salza's insight:

We have come a ways--and still such a long way to go. This story is remarkable in that it surfaces the very same issues of teacher preparation in reading, and execution in the classroom that have plagued us for decades. --Lou

 

Teaser:

JOHN TULENKO: "This is a story about parents making a difference, how a mother’s experience united an entire community and transformed the way children learn in school.

It starts 10 years ago here in Vero Beach, Florida, when Liz Woody’s son Mason was in third grade and hadn’t learned to read...."

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@Ryan_Masa I've Been Waiting Months to see-The Enrichment Program, Assets School,HI @lawrenceschool

@Ryan_Masa I've Been Waiting Months to see-The Enrichment Program, Assets  School,HI @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The Enrichment Program at Assets might be best understood as “electives” at other schools. There are differences though. To start with, Enrichment consists of classes that are in addition to the Fine Art, Performing Arts, Physical Education, and Technology courses that all students are already scheduled for weekly.  Enrichment is scheduled for 50 minutes each day, except Wednesday, and is a time for students to explore other areas of interest or strength. We start by providing students a “menu” during the first week of school of roughly thirty class offerings.  Students then rank which classes they are most interested in pursuing.  Enrichment classes last for three weeks at a time at which point we rotate to the next session.  By the time the school year ends, students will typically have participated in eight or nine different enrichment classes! These classes are not graded, and simply focus on having fun and learning as its own reward.

Lou Salza's insight:

Ryan Masa is the new Principal of the K-8 program at Assets School in Honolulu.  There are several programs that distinguish Assets--Ryan writes about the school wide Enrichment Program--inspired by the work of Joseph S. Renzulli and Sally M. Reis focused on the education of gifted and talented learners:  <http://www.gifted.uconn.edu/nrcgt/> offering choice and engagement of students' talents and interests at the earliest grades!--Lou

 

Excerpt from Ryan's K-* Principal Blog:

 

"The Power of Enrichment

Why was I so excited to see this program in action? Because I think, it’s one of the school’s most distinguishing features and one that embodies so much of the Assets philosophy.  Quite honestly, I’ve never seen anything like it before.

While we always welcome parent involvement at our school, the power of Enrichment is the student choice. Even our youngest students, our six-year olds, are directing their learning and telling us what they want to study. It’s important for children and adolescents to learn that education is not something that happens to you; instead, learning occurs when you are an active participant in the process..."

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5 Essential Skills Needed for Reading Comprehension | Dyslexia | Types of LD

5 Essential Skills Needed for Reading Comprehension | Dyslexia | Types of LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Beginning around third or fourth grade, your child is expected to be able to read a passage of text, understand it and answer questions about it. Here are the five skills needed for reading comprehension

Lou Salza's insight:

Clear, Accurate, Pithy.-Lou

 

Excerpt:


1. Making the Connection Between Letters and Sounds

Once your child grasps the connection between letters (or groups of letters) and the sounds they typically make (phonics), he’ll be able to “sound out” words.

 

2.  Decoding the Text

The process of sounding out words is also known as decoding. As decoding becomes faster and more automatic, your child can shift his focus from sounding out words individually to understanding the meaning of what he is reading.

 

3. Recognizing Words

The ability to read whole words by sight without sounding them out is called “word recognition.” This speeds up the rate at which your child can read and understand a passage of text. This can be a challenging step for kids with dyslexia. Average readers require four to 14 exposures to a word before it becomes a “sight word.” Students with dyslexia may need up to 40 exposures.

 

4.Reading Fluently

Once your child can recognize most words by sight and quickly sound out any unfamiliar words, he can be called a “fluent” reader. Fluent readers read smoothly at a good pace, and use good expression in their voice when reading aloud. Fluency is essential for good reading comprehension.

 

5. Understanding the Text

Fluent readers can remember what they’ve just read and relate the new material to what they already know. They can recall details if asked and summarize what they understood from the passage. 

Readers with dyslexia can struggle to decode individual words. They can also have a harder time remembering what they’ve read. This makes it tougher to complete the important process of understanding and applying their new knowledge to what they’ve already learned."

 

 

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Lawrence School Blog: For Our New Parents, It’s a New School, Year and Outlook!

Lawrence School Blog: For Our New Parents, It’s a New School, Year and Outlook! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I love the start of a new school year.

Even after all these years, it never gets old, is always invigorating and always inspires me. No matter how many times I hear the comments and observations from parents who begin their journey with us at one of these back-to-school sessions, each one touches me deeply. Each one represents a child and family transformed.

Each one, every year.

Best wishes for the school year ahead!
Lou Salza's insight:

To kick off our new Lawrence School Blog, Head of School Lou Salza contributes a very personal reflection about the start of the new school year. No matter how many he has been apart of, each one still inspires and invigorates him. A Lawrence School parent recently told Lou, “My daughter came home and told me she felt smart.” Find out why below.

 
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Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections

Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without.
Lou Salza's insight:

And I thought it was just me!---Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

".....Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks.

The result: less-mature connections between a brain network that controls internally-directed thought (such as daydreaming) and networks that allow a person to focus on externally-directed tasks. That lag in connection development may help explain why people with ADHD get easily distracted or struggle to stay focused.

What's more, the new findings, and the methods used to make them, may one day allow doctors to use brain scans to diagnose ADHD—and track how well someone responds to treatment. This kind of neuroimaging "biomarker" doesn't yet exist for ADHD, or any psychiatric condition for that matter.

The new findings come from a team in the University of Michigan Medical School's Department of Psychiatry. They used highly advanced computing techniques to analyze a large pool of detailed brain scans that were publicly shared for scientists to study. Their results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...."

 

Lead author Chandra Sripada, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues looked at the brain scans of 275 kids and teens with ADHD, and 481others without it, using "connectomic" methods that can map interconnectivity between networks in the brain.

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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, September 17, 4:50 AM

This further validates Dr. Russell Barkley's 3 year/30% claim regarding developmental lag in social/emotional problem solving and difficulty with goal attainment...Executive Functions...

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» The Secret Lives of Women with ADHD - World of Psychology

» The Secret Lives of Women with ADHD - World of Psychology | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Many women with ADHD live with a painful secret: “Shame, unfortunately, seems to be the name of the game, for many women I have worked with who have ADHD,” said Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach.

Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt:

"...Even women with advanced degrees in demanding, high-powered positions feel incredibly overwhelmed once they get home, stressed out by all the household details, she said. “They feel like they are living a lie — that their accomplishments are simply due to good luck.”

Even for women who understand how ADHD makes daily life difficult, one minor mistake or overlooked task can send them reeling from humiliation — “like simply forgetting to sign their child’s school-related paper in time.”...."

  
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Lawmakers spotlight aid available for students with dyslexia Kudos to: @DD_DE14 http://www.decodingdyslexiade.org/

Lawmakers spotlight aid available for students with dyslexia Kudos to:  @DD_DE14  http://www.decodingdyslexiade.org/ | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Lt. Gov. Matt Denn joined lawmakers at the Bear Library Monday to highlight a new law aimed at helping Delaware students with dyslexia and other decoding disabilities.


Lou Salza's insight:

 

 

Excerpt:

 

"....The new rules implemented this school year provide greater access to evidence-based reading interventions for students who have not begun to read by the age of seven. Every Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for disabled students who have not begun to read must list specific interventions being provided to improve their reading skills.

Denn says the new law will help to better involve parents in the planning of their child’s education.

“What we really want is parents of kids who are seven or older who have IEP’s to bring this up at their IEP meetings,” Denn said. “We want them to bring it up at their school ‘I understand my child is entitled to an evidence-based reading curriculum, what are we doing about that?’”

Individualized Education Plans for students with trouble reading must also provide for extra reading help over the summer as part of the new law.

State Senator Nicole Poore (D-Delaware City), who co-sponsored the bill in the General Assembly, says the provision is an important step in providing a continuous education for some students who otherwise would not have retained information over the summer.

 

- See more at: http://www.wdde.org/67550-lawmakers-put-spotlight-aid-students-dyslexia-disabilities?__scoop_post=303d6ed1-3da8-11e4-8b0f-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=311171#__scoop_post=303d6ed1-3da8-11e4-8b0f-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=311171

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Lisa Frankel's curator insight, September 17, 1:16 PM

Decoding Dyslexia-DE would like to thank Lt. Gov. Matt Denn, Senator Poore and Representative Longhurst for their support of this valuable legislation.  Things are moving forward in Delaware!

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Community Education Series www.lawrenceschool.org/communityed | Lawrence School

Community Education Series www.lawrenceschool.org/communityed | Lawrence School | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

You are invited to join us for our 2014/15 Community Education Series at Lawrence School. Each event is free and open to the greater community. Please see below for event details, and register online early as attendance is limited for each event.

All events take place at the Garfield Theatre in Lawrence Upper School:
10036 Olde Eight Rd.
Sagamore Hills, OH 44067
If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Dee Dee Miller via email or at 440-832-7819. You may also download the event flyer.
Lou Salza's insight:
Our parent education series will be a great opportunity listen, ask, learn and connect with others!--Lou Supporting vs. Enabling: Parenting the Child with Executive Function DeficitsTuesday, September 23, 2014
Guest Speaker: Dr. Cheryl Chase
Register Online
read moreUnderstanding Dyslexia: Facts, Myths and TrendsWednesday, October 22, 2014
Register Online
read moreThe World of Assistive Technology: Tools for LifeThursday, November 20, 2014
Register Online
read more
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How Dyslexia Affects the Curriculum | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan

How Dyslexia Affects the Curriculum | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Virtually every subject requires some reading and/or writing. Therefore, it is not a surprise that dyslexia can affect learning in all subject areas. Underlying deficits in accessing written text, reading fluency, spelling, written expression, organizing, following written directions, sequencing, using working memory (needed for problem solving), and visual processing (especially critical for worksheets, textbooks, and tests) can affect learning in different subjects in different ways.

As a consequence of their reading difficulties, students with dyslexia are forced to compensate for their weaknesses by following their peers, verbally processing information, relying on rote memorization, and using hands-on/experiential learning contexts.

Lou Salza's insight:

When I read an article like this I wonder why we won't simply change the way we assess and evaluate all our students--instead of trying to accommodate dyslexics. Grading hurts all kids--including the A students!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

"...Specific pitfalls related to each subject area are summarized below. (Note: Your student may not exhibit all of these difficulties.) A student with dyslexia may have difficulty in:

Science – using a systematic step-by-step approach to the experimental method; decoding and learning novel vocabulary (particularly multisyllabic words); navigating a textbook; identifying key points or what is most important; reading fluency; or writing and spelling for homework, projects, and tests. Difficulty with word retrieval and spelling may confound students on recall tests.Math – learning math terminology, symbols, and directionality when solving a problem; breaking apart multi-step written directions; conceptualizing abstract concepts; estimating; evaluating answers; or using a systematic step-by-step approach.History/Social Studies – transposing dates or maps; decoding and learning novel vocabulary (particularly multisyllabic words); navigating a textbook; identifying key points or what is most important; reading fluently; or writing and spelling for homework, projects, and tests. Difficulty with word retrieval and spelling may confound students on recall tests.Band/Choir – reading music or following multistep directions.Gym – following oral directions; following written directions and diagrams; learning specific vocabulary if they do not have prior learning or experience with it; using directionality; or remembering directions.Art – following step-by-step, sequential directions to complete a project; following diagrams; following oral directions; or keeping organized.Foreign Languages – spelling; learning vocabulary; knowing where to divide or segment words that are presented auditorily; implicitly learning grammatical rules; or fluently reading.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 13, 8:19 AM

There are excellent ideas included which require close 1-to-1 teaching with students. I found that adaptive technologies did not always work for students in the early stages. Teaching was important and being there with the student.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, September 14, 3:15 PM

RPS shares these symptoms. Reversed Positioning Sensation,  caused by the sensing the back side of the letters being written.    Academic achievement in general needs a combination of neurological senses for proper learning. Sensing the feel of the shape in ones' mind of letters (MOTOR) aids in the mental visualization of their appearance. Then the sound value can be applied and remembered. So this, is why learning handwriting is so important, and why so many dyslexics suffer.

These students can be helped by having them change their writing position ( not easy as this is the natural position they are comfortable with).  By turning the hand over, and keeping it in the new position,    so it feels the top/ down movement for making letters will make a world of difference.   Once the education community can understand this, and applies it ,  it will become a new world for these RPS effected individuals.  

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Brain Trauma to Affect One in Three Players, N.F.L. Agrees

Brain Trauma to Affect One in Three Players, N.F.L. Agrees | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The statements are the league’s most unvarnished admission yet that the sport’s professional participants sustain severe brain injuries at far higher rates than the general population.
Lou Salza's insight:

Are our young children in Pop Warner and high school student athletes running a serious risk of suffering brain or nerve damage from playing football?  Might these injuries reveal themselves later in life as they appear to be doing in the NFL players who are suing for treatment and benefits? Flag Football anyone? --Lou 

 

Excerpt:

 

".....They also appear to confirm what scientists have said for years: that playing football increases the risk of developing neurological conditions like chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a degenerative brain disease that can be identified only in an autopsy.

“This statement clears up all the confusion and doubt manufactured over the years questioning the link between brain trauma and long-term neurological impairment,” said Chris Nowinski, the executive director of the Sports Legacy Institute, who has for many years pressured the league to acknowledge the connection between football and brain diseases. “We have come a long way since the days of outright denial. The number of former players predicted to develop dementia is staggering, and that total does not even include former players who develop mood and behavior disorders and die prior to developing the cognitive symptoms associated with C.T.E.”.....

 
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5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback @OpenCollegesAU @MarianneStenger

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback @OpenCollegesAU @MarianneStenger | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Teacher feedback must be informative and encouraging for students to fully understand whether they're learning and what they can do to improve the learning process.
Lou Salza's insight:

Feedback needs to be specific ( based on data and progress towards a goal) , prompt, and carefully delivered (so as not to be interpreted by the learner as an attempt to control or influence them.) Learners need to be involved in the process from setting goals to looking at progress data.  This means assessment must be thoughtful; useful not only to the learner and the teacher but to the administration in terms of setting and adjusting curricular and program goals.How long have we known this? How much longer will we continue to ignore this research and this sound approach? --Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"In recent years, research has confirmed what most teachers already knew: providing students with meaningful feedback can greatly enhance learning and improve student achievement.

Professor James Pennebaker from the University of Texas at Austin has been researching the benefits of frequent testing and the feedback it leads to. He explains that in the history of the study of learning, the role of feedback has always been central.

When people are trying to learn new skills, they must get some information that tells them whether or not they are doing the right thing. Learning in the classroom is no exception. Both the mastery of content and, more importantly, the mastery of how to think require trial-and-error learning.

The downside, of course, is that not all feedback is equally effective, and it can even be counterproductive, especially if it's presented in a solely negative or corrective way.

So what exactly are the most effective ways to use feedback in educational settings?...."

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Could students 'at risk' because of poverty, LD or ESL; benefit from year-round school? 9 minute podcast | PBS NewsHour

Could students 'at risk' because of poverty, LD or ESL; benefit from year-round school?  9 minute podcast | PBS NewsHour | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
At one school in West Virginia, administrators, teachers and parents swear by a year-round calendar that has the same number of teaching days as any other school, but spread throughout the year. Special Correspondent Alison Stewart explores how changing the school calendar can affect student achievement. Continue reading →
Lou Salza's insight:

Check out the alternative delivery of Title I services ( optional week at the start of each session) as well as a more "balanced" placement of vacation and school days to avoid "summer melt" impact on students' skills development.--Lou

 

Excerpt: 

 

"Harris Cooper is a Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at Duke University. While research has documented how long summers can cause students to lose, on average, one month of instruction, he says shifting around the calendar to be year-round is not a definitive way to increase student performance.

But where it has shown an impact he says is with lower-income students. And he also suggests that it could help children with learning disabilities, and those for whom English is a second language..."

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FCTD | Assistive Technology and the IEP What parents need to know

FCTD | Assistive Technology and the IEP What parents need to know | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
FCTD is a national center that offers free information resources on the subject of assistive technology to support organizations and programs that work with families of children with disabilities.
Lou Salza's insight:
Excellent advice to families embarking on the journey through special education law and school procedures to get an Individual Educational Plan (IEP) for their child that includes assistive technology--Lou
Excerpt:
"Where to Start 
In order to determine if a child is eligible for special education services, an evaluation must be conducted. The school system is required to provide the evaluation at no cost to the family. The law requires that particular procedures be followed in the development of the IEP. Each student’s IEP must be developed by a team of knowledgeable persons and must be reviewed at least once a year. The team usually includes the child’s teacher, the parents, the child, if appropriate, a school system representative who is qualified to provide or supervise the provision of special education, and other individuals at the parents’ or school’s request. As their child’s strongest advocate, it is important that families insist that necessary assistive technology devices and services be included in the written IEP. School districts are responsible for providing assistive technology devices and services if it is determined by an IEP team that the child needs them to benefit from his or her educational program. Lack of availability or cost cannot be used as an excuse for denying AT devices or services. In addition, a child is allowed to take a device home if it is needed to enable him or her to benefit from his educational program as determined by the IEP team. Training of teachers’ aides and the student may also be listed in the IEP as AT services. The term “assistive technology” may not appear on the IEP forms used by your child’s school. Instead the form may use terms such as “accommodations, supports, program modifications or supplementary aids and services.” No matter what form is used by the IEP team in your child’s school, the law requires that the assistive technology needs of the child must be considered..." 
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Empathy: The Big Reason College Professors (and teachers) Should Take A MOOC | Edudemic

Empathy: The Big Reason College Professors (and teachers)  Should Take A MOOC | Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"……a strong liberal arts foundation teaches nothing if not empathy, right? So we may justifiably feel we have advanced degrees in imagining what life is like for our students. We look across the seminar table and see their boredom, annoyance, confusion or enthusiasm and figure we have a better than average chance of understanding what they are going through....

"..MOOCs give us access to a simulation of the college student experience. Let me explain how that worked for me recently...."

By Robert McGuire, adjunct instructor at Southern Connecticut State University and editor of the SkilledUp Thought Leadership Blog. <http://www.skilledup.com/blog/>;

 

Lou Salza's insight:

 I enjoyed this refreshing and challenging article! Robert McGuire has been teaching at the college level for 25 years and goes out of his way to enroll in MOOC's to keep in "touch" with what the student-learner experience requires.  I know that whenever I put myself in situations that push me out of my comfort zone, I experience a 'wake up' call alerting me to how our students feel in our classrooms.--Lou

My favorite Excerpts from Robert McGuire's article: 

It’s unlikely, though, that we’ll have a chance to really test the presumption that we know what being a college student is like. The truth is, college teachers like myself are in the odd position of being advocates for a product we no longer buy ourselves. With rare exceptions, the experience we treasure so much is confined to one short period of our lives, and we never again sit facing the blackboard after we earn our degrees.

And not only because we’re like doctors who make lousy patients, either. It’s because college isn’t really set up to serve working adults. Most of us couldn’t find the time to step across the hall and audit a colleague’s course if we wanted to. (Which should tell us something about how truly open we are to working adults who are ready to buy what we’re selling.)

 

But over the last quarter century, in trying to be tough but fair, I may also have numbed myself to the confusion and bewilderment my students were feeling about the work. They were sometimes trying to tell me much the same thing I found myself grumbling through the computer monitor at Devlin — that they weren’t sure what to do and were getting discouraged.

Being in their position, however imperfect a simulation a MOOC may be, reset the levels for me a little bit. I started hearing my students differently. I’m not sure what impact this minor boost of empathy will have on my classroom practices or my course design, but I know I was a little more patient with my students last semester, I think it made me more effective.

 

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