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EFD Blog: Understanding Executive Function Disorder

EFD Blog: Understanding Executive Function Disorder | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....For students, EFD can be devastating because the very skills necessary to be a successful student are those they lack. These students have a particularly difficult time picking topics, getting started on assignments, adding elaboration to writing projects, sequencing, prioritizing assignments, planning out long-term projects, meeting deadlines, organizing materials, sustaining attention, and attending to details. Often, they will reach a point where they are so overwhelmed they will shut down completely, and do nothing except maybe play video games, watch TV, or go on Facebook.

Silly mistakes on math tests, forgetting to do their homework or doing homework and forgetting to turn it in, failing math and science tests because they forgot formulas, and a strong dislike for reading are all common characteristics for kids with EFD. These kids are often fixtures in detention because they are typically late for school or class, and are subjected to constant lectures for lack of motivation from parents and teachers. It should not come as a shock that these kids have lower self-esteem and self-confidence, and think they are not as smart as their peers.

You may wonder if it’s possible for someone with EFD to effectively manage the challenges to become a successful student. The answer is an unequivocal “yes.” There are an enormous number of (almost) fail-proof strategies to help students with AFD effectively navigate their way through school. However, I believe the most important place to start is by showing sensitivity to those who live with these deficits. Although many with EDF cope by pretending they are in on the joke when their friends and family affectionately tease them, l can tell you from experience, it is far from amusing to them...."

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Parenting Coach @UnderstoodOrg: superb website TY! @pensf @E2ENational @ChildMindDotOrg @CAST_UDL @ReadingRockets

Parenting Coach @UnderstoodOrg: superb website  TY! @pensf @E2ENational @ChildMindDotOrg @CAST_UDL @ReadingRockets | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Parenting Coach tool from Understood: Parenting tips and advice for child behavioral disorders and other behavior issues in children. See other help tools.
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This site is so well done! Thank you to  

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On Growth Mindset: A Thank You Letter To The School That Got It Right @LaurelSchool @AnnKlotz | fbomb

On Growth Mindset: A Thank You Letter To The School That Got It Right @LaurelSchool @AnnKlotz | fbomb | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When I was in sixth grade, master girl-grower Ann Klotz made a brave voyage from New York City to Shaker Heights, Ohio so she could run our school. I met her simultaneously as my new classmate Miranda’s mom and as my school’s new Headmistress. Ms. Klotz is a spark who has lit Laurel ablaze with energy and ingenuity. We were “her girls” and she set out to inspire us, to know us deeply, to love us. She taught us we were there to “Dream, Dare, Do.”

She invited us into her office, into her home, into her heart. She made not only our educations but our lives her priority (and showed us that the two are far less separate than we think). She saw not just the people we could be but the ones we already were, and so she asked that we be and do and say our best all the time, everywhere – to each other; about each other; in class; at home; on the internet; after graduation.

At Laurel, with our teachers as our anchors, Ms. Klotz as a leader, and the school’s mission as our springboard, we were asked – no, challenged – to engage with more vigor, to listen with more intent, to leap with more bravery, to speak with more conviction, to fail gloriously.

Our teachers, charged “to inspire each girl to fulfill her promise and better the world,” were entrenched in the business of growing us. They were grower-extraordinaires, with us at each turn, knee-deep in the dirt, not just planting the seeds of our growth but actively cultivating it — questioning, challenging, pushing, demanding, nurturing, encouraging, asking.
Lou Salza's insight:

Emma Miller got this right! Insightful commentary from one who knows!

Dell and I are proud grandparents of a Laurel 1st grader! Thank you to the Faculty and Staff--and to Ann Klotz, "master girl grower" and mentor to school leaders far and near. --Lou

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UNH Football Players Drill Without Helmets To Curb Concussions TY! @NAISnetwork

UNH Football Players Drill Without Helmets To Curb Concussions TY! @NAISnetwork | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Football has a concussion problem, from the National Football League down to Pee-Wee teams. And there are lots of efforts out there to fix it.

But Erik Swartz, a University of New Hampshire professor of kinesiology, studies movement and says there has been very little discussion about getting to the root of the problem: technique. Instead of clashing helmet-first, as football players often do, the better approach is to keep the head up and tackle chest to chest, never leading with your helmet — or your face, neck or shoulders.

Swartz says his idea to experiment with having players drill without helmets came from his own time playing rugby.
Lou Salza's insight:

I was alerted to this article while reading on the NAIS.org web site where Debra Wilson has initiated a discussion around wellness.--Lou

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Why Single Sex Education Is Good For Girls

Why Single Sex Education Is Good For Girls | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
According to the Center for American Progress, women still only make up 14.6 percent of executive officers, 8.1 percent of top earners and a mere 4.6 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs. In Massachusetts, The Boston Club released a report showing that nearly 14 percent of the 100 largest public companies have women as directors, which is below the national average of 17 percent.

Despite these discouraging statistics, there is reason for optimism. Earlier this year an article in Forbes, “11 Reasons 2014 Will Be a Breakout Year for Women Entrepreneurs,” set forth evidence that explains why the numbers of women-owned firms have increased significantly in the last couple of years.  According to research, women are able to build better, more effective teams. Women cooperate and communicate effectively, which are both important qualities of a strong entrepreneur. And women are more proactively seeking visibility these days because they recognize the importance of public speaking, and are beginning to network more aggressively.


While this information is encouraging, it is meaningless unless we ensure that these small gains turn into larger wins. So how do we take what we know and make it mean something?  The answer begins with middle and secondary education for girls.
Lou Salza's insight:

My favorite passage:

 

".... To create female leaders, we need to raise them as leaders. We need to integrate courses into our curricula that go beyond basic English, math and science classes, such as ones geared towards the principles of engineering, or classes that explore the central role of science and technology in shaping human life, civilization and thought. We need to incorporate into our program business-oriented courses that teach our students at a young age how to succeed in the work force. Otherwise women are disadvantaged when they leave school and enter the employment market. We need to continue to foster all-girls programs that provide an atmosphere where girls excel as leaders without a male presence, because research shows that girls are more engaged, and exude more confidence and competitiveness in single-sex environments..."

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Dyslexia Likely Not Caused by Ocular Motility Disorders

Dyslexia Likely Not Caused by Ocular Motility Disorders | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Children with dyslexia do not have the same brain network for reading as children with ocular motility disorders, according to new research. This suggests that ocular motility disorders do not cause dyslexia.

"Pediatricians should know that the best treatment should be focused on spelling properly and stimulating the reading network, not the visual network," Ibone Saralegui, MD, from Galdakao-Usansolo Hospital in Spain, told Medscape Medical News here at the Radiological Society of North America 100th Annual Meeting.
Lou Salza's insight:

It does not matter whether it is old  research, new research, done in Europe or here in the US: Dyslexia can not be treated with colored lenses, overlays, or visual training exercises.  If these work for you--then what you are treating is not dyslexia. --Lou

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Court of Appeals rejects ACLU suit on behalf of Highland Park students

Court of Appeals rejects ACLU suit on behalf of Highland Park students | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Michigan Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of the state of Michigan and against the ACLU in its lawsuit on behalf of Highland Park Schools students, alleging they receive an inadequate education.

The Michigan ACLU filed the lawsuit on behalf of eight students, alleging "inadequate and deficient instruction has resulted in their failure to obtain basic literacy skills and reading proficiency as required by the state."

But in a 2-1 decision released Friday, the Michigan Court of Appeals said the suit should be dismissed against the state and school district defendants, which included the State Board of Education and the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, the panel said. The opinion didn't directly address claims made against Leona Group LLC, a charter school company hired through an emergency manager the state appointed to oversee Highland Park Schools.
Lou Salza's insight:

Disappointing, confusing ruling by the courts. I am easily confused but impossible to discourage. Stay tuned because this will move up to the higher courts. There is an implied requirement in our founding documents that the provision for free public education is the means through which  the benefits of citizenship in a democratic society are acquired and maintained. It was the basis of the 1954 Brown V. Board of Ed decision which made school segregation illegal.

There is something un American about not supporting excellent, effective schools for all kids. 

-Lou

 

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Privacy & other Concerns about ClassDojo and use of Other Tracking Apps for Schoolchildren

Privacy & other Concerns about ClassDojo and use of  Other Tracking Apps for Schoolchildren | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
the carrot-and-stick method of classroom discipline is outmoded, and that behavior apps themselves are too subjective, enabling teachers to reward or penalize students for amorphous acts like “disrespect.” They contend that behavior databases could potentially harm students’ reputations by unfairly saddling some with “a problem child” label that could stick with them for years.
Lou Salza's insight:

I agree with the privacy concerns, and I add indignation and outrage that our schools continue to be a place where compliance is valued over competence, creativity, collaboration and compassion. We have a letter grading system that is just as subjective, just as punitive as the ClassDOJO app, and is used to reward, bribe, punish and humiliate students. Our old grading systems and these new apps teach kids an important lesson about school: 

Learn what they say, when they say and how they say--or they will find a way to hurt you. --just sayin'

Lou

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Dear Mountain Room Parents - The New Yorker

Dear Mountain Room Parents - The New Yorker | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Hi, everyone!

The Mountain Room is gearing up for its Day of the Dead celebration on Friday. Please send in photos of loved ones for our altar. All parents are welcome to come by on Wednesday afternoon to help us make candles and decorate skulls.

Thanks!

Emily".......

Lou Salza's insight:

We who live in schools know this story! Take a break and laugh out loud! Wonderful piece of fiction that tells an abiding truth!!

--Lou

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Holding Kids Back Doesn't Help! So what does Ohio's 3rd grade Reading Requirement Guarantee?

Holding Kids Back Doesn't Help! So what does Ohio's 3rd grade Reading Requirement Guarantee? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
At a time when more states are moving to retain struggling students in lower grades, research shows that such efforts are counterproductive, Deborah Stipek and Michael Lombardo say.

 

A majority of peer-reviewed studies over the past 30 years have demonstrated that holding students back yields little or no long-term academic benefits and can actually be harmful to students. When improvements in achievement are linked to retention, they are not usually sustained beyond a few years, and there is some evidence for negative effects on self-esteem and emotional well-being.

Moreover, there is compelling evidence that retention can reduce the probability of high school graduation. According to a 2005 review of decades of studies by Nailing Xia and Elizabeth Glennie: "Research has consistently found that retained students are at a higher risk of leaving school earlier, even after controlling for academic performance and other factors such as race and ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic status, family background, etc."


Via Tina Marie DeLong
Lou Salza's insight:

Perhaps increased high school drop out rates? Just askin'!-

Lou

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Terry Doherty's comment, November 7, 5:29 PM
I have mixed feelings on this ... there ARE times when holding a child back is productive. I've certainly seen it with my nephew. BUT it was caught very early on in his education.
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Quality of Words, Not Quantity, Is Crucial to Language Skills, Study Finds

Quality of Words, Not Quantity, Is Crucial to Language Skills, Study Finds | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“It’s not just about shoving words in,” said Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek, a professor of psychology at Temple University and lead author of the study. “It’s about having these fluid conversations around shared rituals and objects, like pretending to have morning coffee together or using the banana as a phone. That is the stuff from which language is made.”

In a related finding, published in April, researchers who observed 11- and 14-month-old children in their homes found that the prevalence of one-on-one interactions and frequent use of parentese — the slow, high-pitched voice commonly used for talking to babies — were reliable predictors of language ability at age 2. The total number of words had no correlation with future ability.
Lou Salza's insight:

Love, Love, Love this article! There is no short cut to language development--Lev Vygotsky wrote that all learning is socially mediated back in the 1920s.Policy makers please pay attention!

http://www.learning-theories.com/vygotskys-social-learning-theory.html

 

Vygotsky's  insights into cognitive development can not be obscured by the use of narrow bands of data used to fabricate broad generalizations that form the foundation of weak practice and ill advised policy.  And if we ever thought that technology would "replace" teachers,--well,  think again!

--Lou

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What’s the Difference Between Dysgraphia and Dyslexia?

What’s the Difference Between Dysgraphia and Dyslexia? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It’s not unusual for kids to have both dyslexia and dysgraphia. Dyslexia is primarily associated with trouble reading. But it can also affect writing, spelling and even speaking. Dysgraphia mostly shows up as writing difficulties. Kids with dysgraphia may struggle with handwriting, organizing their thoughts on paper or with both of these activities.

Dyslexia and dysgraphia are brain-based issues. Both tend to emerge during childhood, although some people may not be diagnosed until later in life. Psychologists can get insights into how your child thinks and figure out the specific brain processes that are giving her difficulty. This will make it easier to find strategies that can help her with these lifelong challenges.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thoughtful, accurate, concise. I would add that there are remarkably accurate, easy to use and mobile technologies that can provide an enormous assisst with reading and writing tasks. --Lou

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Philip Powel Smith's curator insight, October 20, 10:53 AM

Understanding terminology is important. We far too often toss terms about as though everyone understands them. I hope this article helps clarify the difference between Dyslexia and Dysgraphia.

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, October 20, 2:14 PM

The confusion exists because identified individuals have issues with related phoneme/grapheme difficulties.  While the motor issue is definitely a reversal issue and that is the basis of the description of dyslexia,  it has  gone unrecognized for what it really is.  Understanding RPS reversed positioning sensation is a step in the right direction.  Since this provides a new way to remediate many of the difficulties dyslexics face, it is urged for all those working with LD students to become aware of the findings.

Shannon Prendgergast's curator insight, November 12, 1:20 PM

This article discussed the differences between dyslexia and dysgraphia. As a student with both it provided an insight into how others look at how I learn and how I present information.  I could use this article as a tool to help me describe my difficulties with certain types of learning to people who don’t always understand the way I present the information. Sometimes when I try to describe what it is like it makes sense to me because I am the one experiencing it. However it doesn't always makes sense to others. This article however is like a third party. It says what I need to be able to say about my own learning while also putting it into terms that others understand. This could help me explain to my teachers in college about my learning styles and struggles I have with certain assignments and ways of learning.  This would help me bridge the gap between understanding and being on the same level as my instructor. By doing so I  would improve my own quality of learning while still being challenged and pushed to learn material in the best way possible for me.

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Channing Tatum Opens Up About Learning Disabilities In T Magazine

Channing Tatum Opens Up About Learning Disabilities In T Magazine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Channing Tatum is on the cover of the latest issue of T, the New York Times Style Magazine, which is a pretty great thing. Better still is the accompanying article, where the 34-year-old actor candidly opens up about his struggles while growing up in the Southern U.S. school system. Some excerpts...

"I have never considered myself a very smart person, for a lot of reasons," Channing reveals, referring to his early difficulties with ADHD and dyslexia. "And so I’ve learned more from people than I have from school or from books."

School was a particular challenge for the award-winning actor -- and not just because of sub-par grades. "You get lumped in classes with kids with autism and Down Syndrome," Channing explains about being placed in special classes, "and you look around and say, 'Okay, so this is where I’m at."'

He adds, "Or you get put in the typical classes and you say, 'All right, I’m obviously not like these kids either.' So you’re kind of nowhere. You’re just different. The system is broken. If we can streamline a multibillion-dollar company, we should be able to help kids who struggle the way I did."
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Channing!--Lou

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Scarier Than Ebola: Did you get your flu shot?

Scarier Than Ebola: Did you get your flu shot? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We Americans do panic really well.

We could use a few pointers on prudence.

Do me a favor. Turn away from the ceaseless media coverage of Ebola in Texas — the interviews with the Dallas nurse’s neighbors, the hand-wringing over her pooch, the instructions on protective medical gear — and answer this: Have you had your flu shot? Are you planning on one?

During the 2013-2014 flu season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 46 percent of Americans received vaccinations against influenza, even though it kills about 3,000 people in this country in a good year, nearly 50,000 in a bad one.

These are deaths by a familiar assassin. Many of them could have been prevented. So why aren’t we in a lather over that? Why fixate on remote threats that we feel we can’t control when there are immediate ones that we simply don’t bother to?
Lou Salza's insight:

We in the USA have a sketchy relationship with data and how we use it. And our questionable use of data is not limited to the education sector!--Lou

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Thinking Differently: An Inspiring Guide for Parents of Children with LD -TY! @E2ENational @DaveFlink

Check out Eye To Eye's billboards up NOW in Times Square!
Lou Salza's insight:

Eye to Eye! Shoulder to Shoulder! Heart to Heart! David Flink at Eye To Eye gets it done!! A great friend to our students and to our families!---Lou

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5 Things Not to Say to Your Child About Dyslexia thank you @benfoss

5 Things Not to Say to Your Child About Dyslexia thank you @benfoss | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Even the best-intended comments can make a child with dyslexia feel discouraged or inadequate. We talked to dyslexia advocate Ben Foss, author of The Dyslexia Empowerment Plan. He shared tips about what words can hurt—and what to say instead.
Lou Salza's insight:

Pithy advice! --Lou

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NYT: Is Parental Involvement in their child's school Overrated? Research says "yes".

NYT: Is Parental Involvement in their child's school  Overrated? Research says "yes". | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
our analyses show that most parental behavior has no benefit on academic performance. While there are some forms of parental involvement that do appear to have a positive impact on children academically, we find at least as many instances in which more frequent involvement is related to lower academic performance.

As it turns out, the list of what generally works is short: expecting your child to go to college, discussing activities children engage in at school (despite the complications we mentioned above), and requesting a particular teacher for your child.
Lou Salza's insight:

 

My favorite passage:

 

"Conventional wisdom holds that since there is no harm in having an involved parent, why shouldn’t we suggest as many ways as possible for parents to participate in school? This conventional wisdom is flawed. Schools should move away from giving the blanket message to parents that they need to be more involved and begin to focus instead on helping parents find specific, creative ways to communicate the value of schooling, tailored to a child’s age. Future research should investigate how parental involvement can be made more effective, but until then, parents who have been less involved or who feel uncertain about how they should be involved should not be stigmatized.

What should parents do? They should set the stage and then leave it."

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The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading omits call for evidence based, beginning reading education approcahes

The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading omits call for evidence based, beginning reading education approcahes | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Campaign for Grade-Level Reading and the 150+ communities working with the Campaign are dedicated to narrowing the gap between children from low-income families and their more affluent peers. This video shows why that gap occurs and how we can close it. Please embed on your website and share on your social media platforms.
Lou Salza's insight:

I watched this video and was stunned to learn that NOWHERE in the statistics or the recommendations do they underscore the need for scientific reading approaches! Once again, we seem to be willing to blame what the film calls the "zipcode lottery" for success or failure to achieve reading milestones. 

The fact is that we are failing lots of kids in all kinds of zip codes because we refuse to implement evidence based reading education approaches. 

While the hunt to identify a 'neural signature' for dyslexia takes place in labs across the country by running children through fMRI machines; I suggest test policy makers and school administrators and professors of education to identify a neural signature for refusal to read, understand and apply relevant research in reading education when designing curriculum for our public school children. --Lou

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J.D. v. Atlanta Sch: "A Lesser Spirit Would Have Been Crushed Long Ago" US Court of appeals decision supporting dyslexic's claim for compensatory program

J.D. v. Atlanta Sch: "A Lesser Spirit Would Have Been Crushed Long Ago" US Court of appeals decision supporting dyslexic's claim for compensatory program | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When the Due Process Hearing was held in November 2005, J.D. was 18 years old and in the 11th grade. He was represented by his aunt, Denice Morgan.

The Administrative Law Judge found that:

- APS failed to provide a FAPE to J.D. for the 2002-03, 2003-04, and 2004-05 school years

- APS had failed to provide J.D. with the key to his education by properly teaching him to read since 1998 when he was in the 3rd grade

- APS misdiagnosed J.D. and labeled him with mental retardation as early as the 3rd grade

- APS made no effort to evaluate J.D. for five years, contrary to clearly established law.

According the ALJ's decision, "Although J.D. exhibited classic signs of dyslexia at a very early age, the ALJ found that APS was still incapable of making a proper diagnosis and it was only due to the continued insistence of J.D.'s family for more testing after March 2003 that led to a proper diagnosis of a learning disability in July 2003."
Lou Salza's insight:

J.D. finally won four years of compensatory education at a private school at the age of twenty--more than ten years after his parents alerted the district to the problems JD was having in the third grade learning to read.

I learned about this case from Candace Head-Dylla on the spell-talk list serve: <spelltalk@listserve.com>

It is remarkable case. It teaches important lessons for parents seeking redress and/or appropriate programs for their dyslexic kids in recalcitrant public districts --and offers a legal toe-hold for advocates on a rock face we have been scaling for years.--Lou 

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Notre Dame College In NE OH Receives Accreditation for Dyslexia Teacher Preparation |

Notre Dame College In NE OH Receives Accreditation for Dyslexia Teacher Preparation | | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The College was one of eight postsecondary schools in a 2014 cohort accredited by the International Dyslexia Association (IDA). Notre Dame is among only 17 colleges in the country to receive the distinction.

The certification recognizes that the framework for the reading endorsement course content in Notre Dame’s teacher preparation programs meets the IDA standards for educators who are teaching dyslexic students, other struggling readers and the general population.

Kathleen Oliverio, Ed.D., assistant professor of education and reading specialist, created the dyslexia reading endorsement program.
Lou Salza's insight:

Yet another great reason to move to the Cleveland area!!-Lou

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States Listen as Parents Give Rampant Testing an F

States Listen as Parents Give Rampant Testing an F | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Parents, students and school officials have joined a national protest of the consequences of Common Core testing.
Lou Salza's insight:

While the Common Core is a reasonable  attempt to raise curriculum standards in the schools; the PARCC assessment piece is a throwback to the worst assessment practices--'common core' without 'common sense'. The citizens are raising up on behalf of their kids! Where is Ohio!? --just sayin'--Lou

 

 

Excerpt:

".....Florida embraced the school accountability movement early and enthusiastically, but that was hard to remember at a parent meeting in a high school auditorium here not long ago.

Parents railed at a system that they said was overrun by new tests coming from all levels — district, state and federal. Some wept as they described teenagers who take Xanax to cope with test stress, children who refuse to go to school and teachers who retire rather than promote a culture that seems to value testing over learning...."

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Colleges With Learning Disability Programs

Colleges With Learning Disability Programs | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Just because you have a learning disability doesn't mean you can't compete in college. Respected institutions across the country offer all kinds of excellent programs aimed at supporting the learning disabled.

Via Tina Marie DeLong
Lou Salza's insight:

Very useful list!

Lou

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 27, 4:23 PM

Thanks, Lou. . useful list 

Shannon Prendgergast's curator insight, November 12, 1:25 PM

Even though I do not want to attended these colleges it is a helpful to consider this while looking at colleges. I will need to call the representatives of the school I wish to apply to and talk with them about what kind of accommodations they have for students like me.  I know I will need to have  accommodations for extended time on tests and assignments as well as needing provided notes because of the challenges I face while trying to copy material from the board. information just gets lost between the link of my brain to my hand. This article is just a reminder of the steps I will need to take.

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Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time, or Simply Screen Time? Researchers say 'Talk to-- not at--children to develop language skills

Is E-Reading to Your Toddler Story Time, or Simply Screen Time? Researchers say 'Talk to-- not at--children to develop language skills | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"Patricia K. Kuhl, a director of the Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences at the University of Washington, led a study in 2003 that compared a group of 9-month-old babies who were addressed in Mandarin by a live instructor with a group addressed in Mandarin by an instructor on a DVD. Children in a third group were exposed only to English.

“The way the kids were staring at the screen, it seemed obvious they would learn better from the DVDs,” she said. But brain scans and language testing revealed that the DVD group “learned absolutely nothing,” Dr. Kuhl said.

“Their brain measures looked just like the control group that had just been exposed to English. The only group that learned was the live social interaction group.”

 

In other words, “it’s being talked with, not being talked at,” that teaches children language, Dr. Hirsh-Pasek said.

Today, what Dr. Kuhl found is commonly referred to as the “Baby Einstein” effect, named for thepopular video series that entranced children from the late 1990s to the mid-2000s, but was ultimately found to have a negative association with language development in infants. In 2009, the Walt Disney Company, facing the threat of a class-action lawsuit, offered refunds to people who had bought the videos.


Via EDTC@UTB, Linda Alexander
Lou Salza's insight:

There are no short cuts to language and cognitive development. Screen time does not substitute for an adult and a toddler interacting with a book including the toddler chewing on the book and of course patting the bunny in Pat The Bunny  

 

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/pat-the-bunny-dorothy-kunhardt/1100058365?ean=9780307120007

 

--Lou

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 15, 10:53 AM

There is a significant difference in terms of parent/child interactions...

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ADHD Is Different for Women: MARIA YAGODA Atlantic

ADHD Is Different for Women: MARIA YAGODA Atlantic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In editorials and in waiting rooms, concerns of too-liberal diagnoses and over-medication dominate our discussions of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. The New York Times recently reported, with great alarm, the findings of a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study: 11 percent of school-age children have received an ADHD diagnosis, a 16 percent increase since 2007. And rising diagnoses mean rising treatments—drugs like Adderall and Ritalin are more accessible than ever, whether prescribed by a physician or purchased in a library. The consequences of misuse and abuse of these drugs are dangerous, sometimes fatal.

Yet also harmful are the consequences of ADHD untreated, an all-too-common story for women like me, who not only develop symptoms later in life, but also have symptoms—disorganization and forgetfulness, for instance—that look different than those typically expressed in males. While the New York Times’ Op-Ed columnist Roger Cohen may claim that Adderall and other “smart” drugs “have become to college what steroids are to baseball,” these drugs have given me, a relatively unambitious young adult who does not need to cram for tests or club until 6 a.m., a more normal, settled life.
Lou Salza's insight:

Important article! The science of ADHD in the USA, often based on rich white, boys, is completely missing our sisters, and daughters. Instead of properly identifying ADHD, girls are often misdiagnosed with depression or anxiety. In my experience girls in school who struggle with executive skills, time management actually care that they can't keep up with expectations and get sad and anxious!

--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"—it is estimated that there are around 4 million who are not diagnosed, or half to three-quarters of all women with ADHD—and the misunderstandings that have ensued about the disorder as it manifests in females, to the early clinical studies of ADHD in the 1970s. “These studies were based on really hyperactive young white boys who were taken to clinics,” Littman says. “The diagnostic criteria were developed based on those studies. As a result, those criteria over-represent the symptoms you see in young boys, making it difficult for girls to be diagnosed unless they behave like hyperactive boys.”

 
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Managing Adult ADD / ADHD's curator insight, December 8, 9:10 PM

More insights on how women experience ADD/ADHD.

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5 Confusing Signs of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities

5 Confusing Signs of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Symptoms of nonverbal learning disabilities can seem contradictory (such as being very talkative but unable to hold a conversation). See five confusing signs.
Lou Salza's insight:

The new site developed by NCLD--formerly LD.ORG is remarkable. This is the beta version--I recommend it to parents and teachers alike. Topics are NVLD, Auditory Processing Disorder, ADHD and others. Clear, concise, accurate and extremely helpful slide shows with text to speech capability for those of us who have print challenges.

----Lou 


Excerpt:


"Some signs of nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) might leave you scratching your head. Someone with NVLD might be extremely talkative, but not socially engaged. That can seem like a contradiction! Explore more of these confusing NVLD symptoms."

Read more: http://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/nonverbal-learning-disabilities/5-confusing-signs-of-nonverbal-learning-disabilities#ixzz3GVlZeKUT ;
Follow us: @UnderstoodOrg on Twitter | Understood on Facebook

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Top 10 Reasons Why Universities Need Entrepreneurs-in-Residence On Campus

Top 10 Reasons Why Universities Need Entrepreneurs-in-Residence On Campus | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Entrepreneurs-in-residence are successful businesspeople – and sometimes prominent members of the nonprofit world – who dedicate a specific amount of time doing research or pursuing other academic pursuits, primarily on campus or at locales associated with an academic institution.

The entrepreneur-in-residence will often wear many hats at a university. These professionals may take on the role of in-class lecturer, mentor student startups on campus, serve as a coach to entrepreneurs, judge business plan competitions and serve on advisory boards. Some universities will have their entrepreneur-in-residence support community outreach initiatives by advising small business owners and working with local high school students on special projects.

These talented men and women bring real-world expertise and entrepreneurial practice to students and academia, enhancing the business theoretical framework taught on campuses across the world.

Simply put, entrepreneurs-in-residence help expand and validate the theoretical knowledge taught on campuses by illustrating it with practical tips and everyday business guidance by sharing their real-world stories.

Lou Salza's insight:

And how many of these successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic?--Lou

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