Students with dys...
Follow
Find
28.6K views | +1 today
 
Scooped by Lou Salza
onto Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Scoop.it!

Rethinking Dyslexia; Rethinking Priorities: Let’s teach our children to read!

Rethinking Dyslexia; Rethinking Priorities: Let’s teach our children to read! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"...While it is true that dyslexics possess and can develop a skill set that is prized in the marketplace, it is a skill set that is overwhelmingly devalued, ignored, and sometimes even punished in school. No school-age child has ever heard the words, “You have dyslexia,” and felt lucky.

Rather, students with dyslexia are called “disabled” by parents and teachers, and much worse names by other kids. They get low grades. They get teased by peers. Because dyslexics struggle to memorize and repeat rote information, misguided teachers, counselors, and even parents draw negative conclusions about their ability to think through and solve problems. Teachers may encourage dyslexics to apply more effort, or may even suggest that a child doesn’t care enough about school work.

The truth is that students with dyslexia often work harder, and care as much as any of their peers—but the results of their efforts are exhausting, disappointing at every turn, discouraging over time and, eventually, totally defeating....."

http://bit.ly/RTDys

more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
Curated by Lou Salza
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

"Voice of Literacy" - Literacy Lines @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @ryan_masa

"Voice of Literacy" - Literacy Lines @KeystoLiteracy @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @benpowers @ryan_masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I’d like to share a resource I recently found that archives podcasts related to literacy. On the Voice of Literacy site, Dr. Betsy Baker (Associate Professor of Literacy studies at the University of Missouri) posts bi-weekly podcasts of interviews of researchers as they discuss the implications of their literacy research.  Most podcasts range from 10 to …
Lou Salza's insight:

Joan Sedita is the founding partner of Keys to Literacy and author of the Keys to Literacy programs and routines. She is an experienced educator, nationally recognized speaker and teacher trainer. She has worked for over 35 years in the literacy education field and has presented to thousands of teachers and related professionals at schools, colleges, clinics, and professional conferences.

In this post Joan shares recently discovered, excellent resources from the University of Missouri and Dr. Betsey Baker. When Joan Sedita speaks, I listen!--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

ReImagine School: Nicole's Story - Lawrence School @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers @LeapofReason

We are excited to share two new Lawrence School videos we believe present a clear picture of the important work we do and the families we serve in a distinctive and, we hope, memorable way. Each acknowledges and explains the concerns and worries of our parents and students. Nicole's story describes and presents Lawrence's purpose (why we serve); our students and families (who we serve); a bit about our program (how we serve) and our unique place in the constellation of educational services in northeast Ohio (the Lawrence Advantage).  

Lou Salza's insight:

In an effort to educate our community about our students and our school, we have embarked on a communications campaign to highlight the experience of students with dyslexia ( Nicole) and students with ADHD ( Nick) before and after they arrive at Lawrence. ReImagine School!--Lou  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

New Approach to Designing Ed Tech @CAST_UDL @iplante @lawrenceschool @ryan_Masa @cdcowen

New Approach to Designing Ed Tech @CAST_UDL @iplante @lawrenceschool @ryan_Masa @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The crew at CAST felt that traditional lesson plans built around print were leaving too many kids out, frustrating some students while boring others.

So they flipped their approach. Rather than help individual students plug back into the classroom, they set out to transform the classroom itself. They built software and digital tools to pack lessons with flexibility, offering every student multiple ways to learn and to express that learning—including print, speech, graphics, music, and interactive games, among others. They called their new mission “universal design for learning,” and a movement was born. Spurred by the rapid advance of computers and broadband Internet in schools, UDL initiatives have sprung up in nearly every state in the last five years.
Lou Salza's insight:

Loved this post--CAST is once again blazing new trails.- Lou

 

Excerpt:

"Rose’s favorite new CAST projects is called Udio (the name’s a mash of UDL and studio), an online reading curriculum funded by the Department of Education. It’s aimed at kids in middle school, the grades where struggling readers start running into trouble in nearly every subject.

Standard reading supports focus on things like phonics and building vocabulary with simple sentences. The problem is that struggling readers aren’t the same as beginning readers. Research shows that these students feel a palpable sense of dread when asked to read a passage of text, measured as a physical stress reaction of sweaty palms and a rapid heart rate. “You realize, oh my God, these kids aren’t even in the same classroom. They’re in the savanna with hungry lions prowling, and you’re trying to teach them phonics,” says Rose.

“We’re not saying that intensive interventions for reading skills, like phonics, decoding, and fluency, aren’t needed,” adds Gabrielle Rappolt-Schlichtmann, CAST’s co-president and director of the Udio project. “But you can’t get traction with those skills unless you practice. And you have to practice with ardent intent. You have to want to do it.”

  
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Lawrence School: Re-Imagining School - YouTube @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

Students learn best when their differences are understood and accepted, when appropriate accommodations are made available and, most importantly, when their strengths as learners are defined, affirmed, and cultivated. Our approach – respecting differences and building on strengths – is vital for students who learn differently and may well serve as a successful model for educating all students, in all schools.
more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 21, 4:42 PM

As Salza says, this ability to accommodate to individual student differences is not good just for student with learning differences, but to all students and the resources, technology and knowledge exists to do this in mainstream schools also. -Lon

Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Learning Disabled or School Disabled? - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Ryan_Masa

Learning Disabled or School Disabled? - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @Ryan_Masa | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
People readily accept that individuals can be reliably differentiated from each other based on fingerprints and DNA. Yet regardless of all that researchers have learned about the brain, educators continue to cling to the belief that it makes sense to treat children as though their brains are (or should be) the same -- identical motherboards fitted with identically stamped circuitry. We have built a system of schooling on the myth of the "normal" brain, the comfortable belief that normal people must all learn the same way, that education can be standardized --standardized curricula, standardized course loads, standardized requirements, standardized teaching methods and lessons, standardized tests, standardized expectations.

Alas, this model hasn't worked out very well. Each brain is a complex web of billions of neural networks, each a unique tapestry woven from different experiences, genetic combinations, and chemistry. Children come to school with profiles of cognitive strengths and weaknesses as different from one another as their fingerprints. As a result, they understand and wrestle with problems in many different ways. They need flexible environments that help them find their own path to learning and, ultimately, to meaningful work.

Stories abound of people who were labeled in school and tormented for having some form of abnormal LD and who became successful in careers in which their "disability" proved to be an asset: dyslexics whose different perceptual abilities suited them to careers in astrophysics, biology, engineering, physics, the arts, and mathematics. 
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Alden Blodget! I could not have said this better!--Lou

My favorite passage:

"....Many educators know that there is something wrong.  The recognition of "multiple intelligences" and different "learning styles" or "temperaments" has led to some "experiential education" and "differentiated instruction" (and, occasionally, to truly differentiated schools). But so far, these efforts seem little more than a bit of tinkering -- like Procrustes offering a choice of blankets. The system itself and the entrenched, faulty assumptions about how people learn remain unchanged. Diagnoses of learning disabilities continue to increase, and standardization marches on, right over my grandson....

more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 11, 10:51 PM

Although I have not read his work extensively, Bernard Stiegler has some interesting and controversial ideas about learning disabilities such as ADD and ADHD. He sees it as less the person and more institutional and technological.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, March 13, 2:11 PM

This is a typical problem for the typical  bright RPS student.  To help see why,  read my new paper: Effects of Physical Rotational Movement Difference and Handwriting Position on Academic Achievement and Learning Disabilities was published in Vol. 6 No.3, 2015. The DOI is 10.4236/psych.2015.63024

Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

@Ryan_Masa How Did They Get Here? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

@Ryan_Masa How Did They Get Here? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In his latest book, How Did You Get Here? Students with Disabilities and Their Journeys to Harvard, Professor Thomas Hehir tackles a subject that has occupied much of his life’s work: ensuring access, inclusion, and opportunity for all students regardless of their diagnoses.
Lou Salza's insight:

The interesting thing to me about the title of this book is that it surfaces the assumptions we make about students very early on. Tom Hehir has put his finger on the larger question of not only how we define 'disability' at places like Harvard, but how narrowly we define success everywhere else in schools on the way to a place like Harvard. N.B. Test scores and grades inform but DO NOT DEFINE US.  ---Lou 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Old Surroundings Reveal New Feelings Of Strength, Lessons Learned @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

Old Surroundings Reveal New Feelings Of Strength, Lessons Learned @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The sinking feeling was just under the surface as I sat in class during my second day of a two-week fellowship at Columbia University, Teacher’s College.

I was back in the classroom, sitting at a desk for the first time since 1980. There I was with 18 other heads of independent schools from all over the globe, classmates and Fellows at the Klingenstein Center for Independent School Leadership, class of 2015.

The professor had just handed out a form and asked us to take 15 minutes to write our own philosophy of education ­– in response to readings by Michel de Montaigne and John Dewey, both of whom I had read before and both of whom I had read again in preparation for this class – and hand it in!
Lou Salza's insight:

No matter how far you travel, how old you get, or how completely you try to forget, our first experiences as struggling readers in school are deeply etched on our hearts and minds. 

And just so we are clear: dyslexia is neither a gift nor a curse though we can feel both cursed and gifted:   The curse is the narrow way we evaluate and judge all children in school. The gift is the people we meet later in our lives, when we are free from the confines of traditional academics and school, who understand and share our journey.--Lou

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

What’s the Difference Between Executive Functioning Issues and ADHD? @UnderstoodOrg @lawrenceschool

What’s the Difference Between Executive Functioning Issues and ADHD? @UnderstoodOrg @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Simply put, executive functions are self-regulating skills. We all use them every day to do things like plan ahead, stay organized, solve problems and focus on what’s important. These are some of the same things kids with ADHD have trouble doing. So is there a difference between executive functioning issues and ADHD? And if so, what is it?

ADHD is a disorder that’s defined by three broad sets of behaviors or symptoms: inattention, impulsivity and hyperactivity. Kids with ADHD have trouble doing things like paying attention, following directions, sitting quietly and waiting for their turn.

Children are diagnosed with ADHD if they demonstrate these symptoms much more often than other children their age do, and so much so that and it’s causing them real difficulty at school and in their lives.

Executive functions, on the other hand, are very specific ways that the brain works. This means that things like inattention and impulsivity are divided into more distinct skills that kids typically develop during childhood and adolescence.
Lou Salza's insight:

Concise, accurate and useful! I love Understood.org!--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

We Should Be Teaching Our Students Like Yoda Taught Luke | WIRED BY VICKI PHILLIPS @lawrenceschool

We Should Be Teaching Our Students Like Yoda Taught Luke | WIRED BY VICKI PHILLIPS @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Personalized learning isn’t the latest fad in education. In fact, it’s an approach that great teachers have long used to ward off drudgery, to challenge students to do their best and to infuse their classrooms with energy and a sense of possibility. Thousands of years after Socrates engaged and challenged his student Plato with dialogues that inspired him to write The Republic, Charles Babbage encouraged Ada Lovelace to use her mathematical talents to create what is now considered the first computer program.
Lou Salza's insight:

Isn't it time to re-design the school environment

Excerpt:

"...What’s different today is the pace at which the momentum for personalized learning is building, thanks to a combination of cutting-edge technology, a growing body of research and a wider appreciation for the power of this approach to teaching and learning. Taken together, these catalysts have helped grow personalized learning from a sporadic practice to an insurgent philosophy.

The next challenge is to use what we already know: that tutoring and learning for mastery can make a dramatic difference for individual students, to help discover how to deliver that kind of rich, personalized learning experience to millions of students..."

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

A-listers reimagine learning @E2ENational @DaveFlink @bnpowers @lawrenceschool

A-listers reimagine learning @E2ENational @DaveFlink @bnpowers @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Celebrities are working to help transform learning for kids in U.S. public schools. Vanessa Kirsch, founder and CEO of venture philanthropy fund "New Profit," explains the focus of the fund.
Lou Salza's insight:

I liked this spot very much.  Vanessa Kirsch moves the conversation and the dialogue about education away from the 19th and 20th Century quagmires into a re-consideration of school design. It should not escape us that the inspiration for this conversation is centered in the experience of our students who come to school with dyslexia and ADHD.--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Learning Differently, Learning the Same - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @NAISnetwork

Learning Differently, Learning the Same - Independent Ideas Blog @lawrenceschool @NAISnetwork | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"... the Lawrence School in Cleveland, Ohio, impressed me with its academic rigor and its mainstream social environment — a place where students who learn differently could prepare to flourish in a world where such differences are seldom accommodated."

Lou Salza's insight:

Proud to be mentioned in a blog acknowledging the challenges faced by so many students with learning differences in all kinds of schools. Many thanks to all those who work on their behalf at home and at school!--Lou 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Why Some Teams Are Smarter Than Others ANITA WOOLLEY,THOMAS W. MALONE&CHRISTOPHER CHABRIS, NYT

Why Some Teams Are Smarter Than Others ANITA WOOLLEY,THOMAS W. MALONE&CHRISTOPHER CHABRIS, NYT | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Instead, the smartest teams were distinguished by three characteristics.

First, their members contributed more equally to the team’s discussions, rather than letting one or two people dominate the group.

Second, their members scored higher on a test called Reading the Mind in the Eyes, which measures how well people can read complex emotional states from images of faces with only the eyes visible.

Finally, teams with more women outperformed teams with more men. Indeed, it appeared that it was not “diversity” (having equal numbers of men and women) that mattered for a team’s intelligence, but simply having more women. This last effect, however, was partly explained by the fact that women, on average, were better at “mindreading” than men.

Lou Salza's insight:

Take turns, play nice! , pay attention to team members, employ more women!--Why does this not surprise?--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

I Owe It All to Community College:Tom Hanks on His Two Years at Chabot College

I Owe It All to Community College:Tom Hanks on His Two Years at Chabot College | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
President Obama hopes to make two years of free community college accessible for up to nine million Americans. I’m guessing the new Congress will squawk at the $60 billion price tag, but I hope the idea sticks, because more veterans, from Iraq and Afghanistan this time, as well as another generation of mothers, single parents and workers who have been out of the job market, need lower obstacles between now and the next chapter of their lives. High school graduates without the finances for a higher education can postpone taking on big loans and maybe luck into the class that will redefine their life’s work. Many lives will be changed.

Chabot College is still in Hayward, though Mr. Coovelis, Ms. Fitzgerald and Mr. Kennedy are no longer there. I drove past the campus a few years ago with one of my kids and summed up my two years there this way: “That place made me what I am today.”
Lou Salza's insight:

Remarkable story made even more remarkable because Tom Hanks looks back to his community college days as the change that made a difference for him....--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...IN 1974, I graduated from Skyline High School in Oakland, Calif., an underachieving student with lousy SAT scores. Allowed to send my results to three colleges, I chose M.I.T. and Villanova, knowing such fine schools would never accept a student like me but hoping they’d toss some car stickers my way for taking a shot. I couldn’t afford tuition for college anyway. I sent my final set of stats toChabot, a community college in nearby Hayward, Calif., which, because it accepted everyone and was free, would be my alma mater.

For thousands of commuting students, Chabot was our Columbia, Annapolis, even our Sorbonne, offering courses in physics, stenography, auto mechanics, certified public accounting, foreign languages, journalism — name the art or science, the subject or trade, and it was probably in the catalog. The college had a nursing program that churned out graduates, sports teams that funneled athletes to big-time programs, and parking for a few thousand cars — all free but for the effort and the cost of used textbooks.

Classmates included veterans back from Vietnam, women of every marital and maternal status returning to school, middle-aged men wanting to improve their employment prospects and paychecks..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Lawrence School:Nick's Story @lawrenceschool @benpowers @cdcowen @ATDyslexia @ryan_masa @claudiadaggett

Lawrence School is an independent, K-12 coeducational day school serving students with learning differences and attention deficits. With our small classes, unique curricula, and hands-on learning opportunities, we provide students from nearly 70 communities and 10 counties throughout northeast Ohio with an exceptional educational experience that teaches to their distinct learning styles, ignites their potential, and inspires academic and social success.
Lou Salza's insight:

NIck represents a Lawrence Lower School student with attention challenges. This is the second video in our "reimagine school" communications campaign to draw attention to our kids, their families and the work of Lawrence School in northeast Ohio.--Lou 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

TY! @ATDyslexia 4 Intro 2:Google's Dyslexia Resources | @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @_CLCook

TY! @ATDyslexia 4 Intro 2:Google's Dyslexia Resources |   @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @_CLCook | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This is the first article in a four-part series exploring how Google has entered the AT world and become a great option for students with dyslexia. It will explain the basics of how Google’s Chrome browser can be used in various ways to help with reading and writing. The second part will look at specific Chrome extensions that work in conjunction with various websites and the education tools of Google Drive. The third part will explain specific Chrome apps that can accommodate language difficulties. Finally, the fourth part will explore add-ons to Google Docs that can help with various writing and study skills.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Jamie!

Lawrence now has introduced Chromebooks into our middle school. The google environment offers several robust strategies and tools to support students with dyslexia. As you point out, these are not device specific.  The bottom line has always been that technology is not a solution--it is a strategy or a tool.  At the same time, when we have the right strategy and the rights tools, the solution is within our grasp!--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

​​​Trustee, Headmistress, mentor & friend Nurturing Resilience: NAIS Blog @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool

​​​Trustee, Headmistress, mentor & friend Nurturing Resilience: NAIS Blog @AnnKlotz @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Resilience isn't a race; we all make progress over the course of our lives.  When we cultivate resilience in ourselves, we help our students and children do the same.  Celebrate success but do not fear failure. It's not the mistake that matters; it's what we learn from it as we move forward that counts. 
Lou Salza's insight:

Great piece--great advice! Thank you Ann! Ann is the Head of Laurel School for Girls where our grand-daughter Elise is in 1st grade. She is the Director and co-founder of the Center for Research on Girls at Laurel. She serves on the Lawrence School Board of Trustees and she is a voice of wisdom and sagacity in the Cleveland Council of Independent School. She is a treasured colleague, a mentor and a friend. --Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

When Struggling With Dyslexia Makes You A Better Entrepreneur @cdcowen @lawrenceschool

When Struggling With Dyslexia Makes You A Better Entrepreneur @cdcowen @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In addition to having Jaybird Bluetooth earbuds around his neck at all times, Keiser employs Voice Dream to read his emails and news articles, along with Evernote for retaining information and Audible for consuming books. "The speed at which I’m now reading through my ears, which felt like cheating at times, is transformational," says Keiser. "I used to give up most of Sunday to read the things I couldn’t read the rest of the week. I’m so thankful, because what I got back was time with my children."
Lou Salza's insight:

News flash: in School at least it is not dyslexia we  struggle with exclusively but with the poor, anachronistic, one size fits all  design of school practices and requirements. Later in life away from school we are liberated and we convince ourselves that the struggle bestowed gifts. If dyslexia is a gift,  every student in our fourth grade and I want to return it.  --Just sayin'- Lou

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

@ATDyslexia Assistive Tech Basics for Students with Dyslexia | Articles | Noodle @cdcowen

@ATDyslexia  Assistive Tech Basics for Students with Dyslexia | Articles | Noodle @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Incorporating AT into Schools
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) requires Individualized Education Plan (IEP) teams in public schools to consider assistive technology as an accommodation for students with dyslexia, and an AT evaluation may be needed to determine the best technology tools for the needs of particular students. In addition, AT accommodations can be part of students’ 504 plans. Once dyslexic students enter college, they are responsible for seeking out their own AT accommodations, and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) protects their rights to those accommodations. For more information on the legal aspects of incorporating AT into the education of dyslexic students, please explore Wrightslaw, a comprehensive website led by special education attorney Peter Wright.

In addition to the legal process, parents and teachers can work together for the good of students with dyslexia. Most teachers enter the profession because they care about kids and have a true interest in helping them succeed. Unfortunately, many educators do not have a complete knowledge of assistive technology and how it can help their students with reading and writing difficulties. Parents and teachers can learn about AT together, share ideas, and strategize the best ways to implement them in schools.

Another thing to consider is that private schools that specialize in educating students with dyslexia often incorporate assistive technology into their academic programs. In many cases, they have specialists who train students to use AT and help teachers incorporate the tools into their classrooms.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you for this great article, Jamie Martin! Excellent overview of the way that technology can level the academic playing field, and align strengths so that weaknesses become irrelevant. AT shifts the focus from compliance with the more mechanical requirement for student learning and achievement, by removing the impediments to production. Let's all aim for new school designs that eliminate the need for accommodation! --Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool

The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated. Keith Oatley, an emeritus professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Toronto (and a published novelist), has proposed that reading produces a vivid simulation of reality, one that “runs on minds of readers just as computer simulations run on computers.” Fiction — with its redolent details, imaginative metaphors and attentive descriptions of people and their actions — offers an especially rich replica. Indeed, in one respect novels go beyond simulating reality to give readers an experience unavailable off the page: the opportunity to enter fully into other people’s thoughts and feelings.

The novel, of course, is an unequaled medium for the exploration of human social and emotional life. And there is evidence that just as the brain responds to depictions of smells and textures and movements as if they were the real thing, so it treats the interactions among fictional characters as something like real-life social encounters.

Lou Salza's insight:

And it bears repeating that there are three different ways to read: with our eyes, with our ears, and with our finger tips.  Technology allows us to combine these in ways that should remove most traditional barriers to literacy. While I struggled with reading, and I am still fatigued easily by eye reading, I love what reading does to me. It enhances experience, deepens understanding of the world and history, and broadens horizons- all while sitting in a comfortable chair!---Lou 

more...
Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 7, 3:58 PM

When I was in the classroom, I always had the dream of teaching a whole history course primarily through novels of various eras.  I guess I was on to something all those years ago. :) -Lon

Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Wakefield, MA ‘Beyond Self Defense’ goes above and beyond teaching Karate : Sensei Louis “Louie” DiBiccari

Wakefield, MA ‘Beyond Self Defense’ goes above and beyond teaching Karate : Sensei Louis “Louie” DiBiccari | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it


“When I decided to take karate, I visited every school in the area,” he said. “No one greeted me, even spoke to me. They just want to take your money and sign you up. Then I came to Louie’s studio; he stopped and recognized me as soon I walked in the door. He spent about 40 minutes talking to me. I’ve been here ever since. With Louie, it’s really about the students; it’s never about the money. This place is a hidden gem.”
One of Louie’s T’ai Chi students said, “He doesn’t do it for the accolades or the money, he teaches for the love of the art and his love for people.” Unlike most self-defense programs, he doesn’t charge more for higher belt levels and the rates are very reasonable. His students admit to feeling like they have to offer more money because his programs are worth so much since they get so much out of it.
All of the teachers in the studio are adult black-belts who share his commitment to teaching and helping students and adults learn this ancient technique safely and accurately. From parents watching their children learn karate, many have since enrolled in self-defense or T’ai Chi classes.

Lou Salza's insight:

Our Cousin Louie has been studying the martial Arts since he was a boy. From 1975-1979 Louie taught karate to residential students at the Landmark School In Pride's Crossing. With the right instructor and at the right school, the study of Kata, and Tai'Chi can help our kids develop physical and mental stamina, and build confidence. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

@UnderstoodOrg Through Your Child’s Eyes walk 'in their shoes' @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

@UnderstoodOrg Through Your Child’s Eyes walk 'in their shoes' @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It’s one thing to read about how a learning or attention issue can affect your child. It’s another thing to see it through your child’s eyes. Experience firsthand how frustrating it can be when your hand won’t write what your brain is telling it to write. Find out why it can be so hard to complete a simple task even when you’re trying to pay attention. Use these one-of-a-kind simulations and videos to get a better sense of what it feels like to have learning and attention issues.
Lou Salza's insight:

I applaud Understood.org for this sequence of videos and simulations.  They well worth our time.  The student explanations are of course spot on. While the simulations are --well--simulations, they convey the feeling if not the substance of the challenges and struggles.--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Your Brain Is Primed To Reach False Conclusions by CHRISTIE ASCHWANDEN @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool

Your Brain Is Primed To Reach False Conclusions by CHRISTIE ASCHWANDEN  @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Paul Offit likes to tell a story about how his wife, pediatrician Bonnie Offit, was about to give a child a vaccination when the kid was struck by a seizure. Had she given the injection a minute sooner, Paul Offit says, it would surely have appeared as though the vaccine had caused the seizure and probably no study in the world would have convinced the parent otherwise. (The Offits have such studies at the ready — Paul is the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and author of “Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All.”) Indeed, famous anti-vaxxer Jenny McCarthy has said her son’s autism and seizures are linked to “so many shots” because vaccinations preceded his symptoms.

But, as Offit’s story suggests, the fact that a child became sick after a vaccine is not strong evidence that the immunization was to blame. Psychologists have a name for the cognitive bias that makes us prone to assigning a causal relationship to two events simply because they happened one after the other: the “illusion of causality.” A study recently published in the British Journal of Psychology investigates how this illusion influences the way we process new information. Its finding: Causal illusions don’t just cement erroneous ideas in the mind; they can also prevent new information from correcting them.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank You to our good friend and colleague Steven Dykstra from  spelltalk@listserve.com for this provocative article. The subject of this study is how quickly "Illusions of causality" form in medicine especially around the vaccination debate going on in the US right now. These illusions establish a strong grip on our minds that will not yield to sound data, evidence or information that exposes the fallacy. I read this because Steven Dykstra used it as an example of why it is so hard to get evidence based reading education practices firmly established in our schools. I have written before about my own work in schools with teachers --that there is integrity in resistance to change.  This article provides data about where that integrity resides. --Lou

The last paragraph is a call to action:

 

Excerpt:

 

"...the lesson of controversial political, health and science issues is that people don’t apply their critical-thinking skills in the same way when they have a preference for who’s right.” Studies by law professor Dan Kahan at Yale show that even highly numerate people are prone to cognitive trapswhen the data contradicts the conclusion most congenial to their political values.

So where does this leave us? With a lot of evidence that erroneous beliefs aren’t easily overturned, and when they’re tinged with emotion, forget about it. Explaining the science and helping people understand it are only the first steps. If you want someone to accept information that contradicts what they already know, you have to find a story they can buy into. That requires bridging the narrative they’ve already constructed to a new one that is both true and allows them to remain the kind of person they believe themselves to be."

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Congratulations to The Laurel School of Princeton, for the Dyslexic Mind: Moved to a New Campus

Congratulations to The Laurel School of Princeton, for the Dyslexic Mind: Moved to a New Campus | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Laurel School’s experienced faculty and staff have been instructing students with dyslexia in Mercer County and nearby areas of New Jersey and Pennsylvania for over 35 years, and are now offering an entire school program designed specifically for the dyslexic mind.
“Our objective at the Laurel School is to offer the most advanced learning techniques to children in a way that maximizes the potential of each student,” says Executive Director Dr. Gordon Sherman.   “We use evidence-based instruction for our students and expert professional development for educators, empowering students to grow into innovative members of society. We call this Celebrating Cerebrodiversity, because we believe students with dyslexia can contribute extraordinary gifts to our world when they are provided with a properly enriched learning environment.”
Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt:

"Dr. Sherman was Director of the Dyslexia Research Lab at the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and faculty member in Neuroscience at Harvard Medical School before becoming the Executive Director at The Newgrange School in Hamilton, NJ in 2002 and the Laurel School in 2012. Dr. Sherman’s Ph.D. is in Developmental Psychobiology; his research focused on development of the brain and the understanding of developmental dyslexia. He is the author and editor of over 80 scientific articles, reviews, and books, and he was the President of the International Dyslexia Association (and since 2010 is back on the IDA board). “We are thrilled to be offering this comprehensive educational experience for students with dyslexia right here in Princeton, New Jersey,” he adds. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

@edutopia Are there really 'sight' words? Making Sense of Words That Don't appear to conform to patterns

@edutopia Are there really 'sight' words? Making Sense of Words That Don't appear to conform to patterns | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Linguistics is a science, and orthography should be taught that way. Our students should be taught to seek evidence for particular spellings and pronunciations. Let's investigate the word two. The first thing a student should do is come up with a scientific hypothesis about why this word contains the letter w and then go in search of the evidence. Sooner or later, they come up with this evidence: the w is there to mark the relationship of the word two with twice, twin, between, twenty, twilight, and so many more. Here is a graphic of the investigative process:
Lou Salza's insight:

our system of writing and spelling in English preserves the meanings of words despite changes and migrations of our pronunciation. Encouraging our dyslexic student to become "linguistic Detectives does two things: 1. it engages students' intellect and curiosity; 2. reveals patterns in so called 'sight' words.--Lou

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

@Ryan_Masa What do Dyslexia and the State of the Union Address have in common? A Boy Named Tommy

@Ryan_Masa What do Dyslexia and the State of the Union Address have in common? A Boy Named Tommy | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Our story starts in Virginia where Tommy was born but quickly moves to Georgia and South Carolina where he was raised with his two older sisters and younger brother. His father was a Presbyterian minister who also occasionally taught at university, and his loving mother was herself the daughter of a Presbyterian minister.  Tommy’s father was demanding, and scholarship and piety defined his household. Unfortunately for Tommy, he was a poor student who did not learn the alphabet until age 9 and wasn’t able to read until almost age 12. These struggles led his teachers to think of him as slow and his parents to describe him as a “dolt” and “lost cause.”  Tommy enjoyed learning though and from a young age, aspired to greatness. His parents offered him academic support and his father, being the prominent pastor that he was, would instruct Tommy for hours, each night, in the art of oratory and debate.
Who is Tommy?
When Tommy finished college, he stopped going by his first name and started using his middle name. We know Tommy better as the United States’ 28th president – Thomas Woodrow Wilson. Though undiagnosed, it is very likely that Woodrow Wilson had some learning difference. Many historians believe he had dyslexia, and that’s the part of the story that makes me think of Assets School.
Lou Salza's insight:

Ryan Masa, K-8 Principal of the Assets School in Honolulu,  weaves together a cautionary tale for all educators: First he takes the dangerous conclusions parents and teachers often draw regarding children who struggle to learn to read in school. Next he weaves  gives us a lesson in US History relevant to the State of the Union address this week. Finally he brings us to Assets School where 2e students have been well cared for and brilliantly educated for 3 decades. This is a must read!--Lou

more...
No comment yet.