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Billy Bob Thornton Talks About Dyslexia & A teacher who encouraged him in his Arkansas high school

Billy Bob Thornton talks with Harvey Hubbell V about dyslexia in an excerpt from the film, Dislecksia: The Movie.

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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Leadership In Action – Talking About Anxiety @lawrenceschool TY! @Gyli_Matt_Nink 

Our GYLI (Global Youth Leadership Institute) students organized an event to help students talk about their anxieties and realize the support system that i
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Our Upper School campus was the host site for a student-led discussion about anxiety last Friday afternoon. The idea was developed by three of our senior GYLI (Global Youth Leadership Institute) students and brought to life by Ms. Nieves-Caraballo. More than 40 students and faculty members participated in this meaningful event. Here are some of the highlights:
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Welcome to Our Pride of Lions! Confident, reliant, joyful, sustained, and buoyed @lsalza on @lawrenceschool

Welcome to Our Pride of Lions! Confident, reliant, joyful, sustained, and buoyed @lsalza on @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
They were confident as they met the challenges of team competition, reliant on themselves and each other as they pushed past doubts and personal bests, joyful despite exhaustion and pain, and sustained and buoyed by the support of teachers, coaches, friends and family in the stands and on the sidelines.
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The Best Schools In The World Do This. Why Don't We?

The Best Schools In The World Do This. Why Don't We? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
You know, the classes formerly known as "voc-ed" — auto repair, welding, carpentry, etc. The report suggests that, in the U.S., many schools have failed to adapt their CTE offerings to fit the needs of the modern economy, preparing students for jobs of the past instead of matching them with today's employers.

It's strange given the mantra heard often from U.S. policymakers and educators, that today's schools should prepare students to be "college and career ready." In reality, Takumi, the Hawaii Democrat, says many schools "have kind of pushed career to the side." As a result, too often students need college in order to be career ready.

To make matters worse, in the U.S. CTE also has a perception problem. Stephenson, the Utah Republican, says "it is considered a second tier for low-performing students. ... That is our tradition in America."
Lou Salza's insight:
Excerpt: Research suggests that preschool, when done well, can have a profound impact on children's lives, but too often in the U.S. it's done badly or not at all…….
......often in the U.S., teachers work in isolation, cut off from their fellow teachers. In contrast, Stephenson says, many high-performing countries have embraced a team-teaching model, where newer teachers are constantly observing veteran teachers and being observed, fine-tuning their skills in real time.
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A @LeapofReason "Becoming a High-Performance Nonprofit" @GlynNorthington @lawrenceschool do it 4 those we serve!

A @LeapofReason "Becoming a High-Performance Nonprofit" @GlynNorthington @lawrenceschool do it 4 those we serve! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A group of nonprofit leaders, the Leap of Reason Ambassadors Community, developed a North Star, called the Performance Imperative, to help guide the continuous growth and evolution of nonprofits. The Ambassadors started by defining “high-performance,” and then by identifying seven organizational pillars that can help nonprofits become high performing.

What I particularly like about the high-performing definition developed by the Ambassadors –

High performance is the ability to deliver—over a prolonged period of time—meaningful, measurable, and financially sustainable results for the people or causes the organization is in existence to serve

– is that the definition perfectly captures what nonprofit executive directors, staff, boards and volunteers are dedicated to doing. Almost without exception, the people I have met working in nonprofit organizations are striving to:

Provide meaningful, measurable, and financially sustainable results for their clients
Be the best they can be – they want their organizations to be high-performing, excellent, and successful.
Lou Salza's insight:
“The greater danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.” Michelangelo Buonarroti
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.@lawrenceschool Advancement Professional Development and Luncheon! Wednesday, June 8, 2016
10:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.

.@lawrenceschool Advancement Professional Development and Luncheon! Wednesday, June 8, 2016<br/>10:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m. | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Special purpose schools are unique in their history, culture, and constituent base.  Therefore, building and sustaining philanthropic support cannot be accomplished with a traditional approach.  Ingrid Healy understands this challenge and can help.  This interactive professional development will offer perspective on developing a strategic plan for a successful fundraising program.  This is a chance to learn, collaborate, and kick your program into high gear!
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This is a chance to learn, collaborate, and kick your program into high gear!
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Why more high-school seniors need to be like Malia Obama and take a gap year @lawrenceschool

Why more high-school seniors need to be like Malia Obama and take a gap year @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
But more high school students should be following Malia’s lead and getting off the conveyor belt that leads them to follow the well-plotted and well-trod course to college simply because they don’t know what else to do with their lives three months after they leave high school.

I met many of these students later on as 20-somethings while reporting my new book, There Is Life After College. Those who weren’t ready for college ended up drifting through their undergraduate years. Some of them dropped out short of a degree, while others graduated from college without any real hand-on experiences to showcase to employers —such as internships, research projects and study abroad.

If young adults are to succeed eventually in the job market, they need environments where they can explore for a while before they settle. The family home and high school, with their close supervision and regimented schedule, don’t provide such space.

The gap year provides such space to explore careers, work and earn money, and learn new skills.
Lou Salza's insight:
Would--could the USA support a mandatory year of national service? just wondering!-Lou
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Online Dyslexia Simulation Is Compelling, Powerful, and Wrong – International Dyslexia Association by @cdcowen @bnpowers @lawrenceschool

Online Dyslexia Simulation Is Compelling, Powerful, and Wrong – International Dyslexia Association by @cdcowen @bnpowers @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

On March 3, an item was published on the Internet that compelled me to step forward. You may have seen it, a post claiming to simulate what it is like to read with dyslexia. I admit that I am not a fan of dyslexia simulations. At best, they seem overly simplistic. At worst, they distort. But the technical ingenuity of this recent dyslexia simulation coupled with the dynamism of the Internet makes this one compelling, powerful, and deeply troubling.
 
The post uses the text of Wikipedia’s definition of dyslexia (not one of the better ones). Its algorithm scrambles all but initial and final letters 20 times a second in randomly selected words. I hate sending any more traffic to this simulation; however, understanding exactly what it does is difficult to grasp without seeing it. Here is the URL: http://geon.github.io/programming/2016/03/03/dsxyliea

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Why Schools Should Make Sleep a Priority @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool

Why Schools Should Make Sleep a Priority @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Sleep. We all know kids need it, and without it, they don't perform as well in school.

As we've reported in the past, the National Academy of Pediatrics recommends that middle and high schools start no earlier than 8:30 a.m. to better align with the natural body rhythms of adolescents.
Lou Salza's insight:
Important article for home and school!-Lou
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 7, 10:34 AM
This is an important article. We have known the benefits of good sleeo for children for years and fail to implement changes to schools that meet those needs. On top of it, parents some allow children to hide in their rooms playing on screens through the night.
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Kindle Fire's Word Wise: Power Up Student Vocabulary @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

Kindle Fire's Word Wise: Power Up Student Vocabulary @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Word Wise, available on many popular English language titles, makes it easier to enjoy and quickly understand more challenging books. Short and simple definitions automatically appear above difficult words, so you can keep reading with fewer interruptions. Tap on a word to bring up a simple card with definitions, synonyms, and more. You can adjust the number of hints you see with a simple slider.
Lou Salza's insight:
Just got a new Kindle Fire with this great new feature: definitions and synonyms appear above challenging or unusual words and terms. This will help or dyslexic readers. The feature can be combined with Kindle Immersion reading ( simultaneous narration along with text) for a powerful aid to phonological processing and semantic access. Way cool!--Lou 
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Accountability in gov't?: A Federal Program that Is Accountable & Working @PaulCarttar @mmorino

From its inception in the early days of the Obama presidency, the Social Innovation Fund (SIF) was positioned as a different kind of program, actively touted by the White House to be a "new way of doing business" for the federal government.

Seven years later, despite its early hype and controversy, a set of independent reports released in December by the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the SIF's parent agency, clearly establish that the SIF is very different—in its readiness to embrace accountability for results and its demonstrated success to date in generating them.

As the SIF's initial director, I'm very sad to say, however, that these reports appear to have gone unnoticed by the nonprofit press, the public policy community, even the blogosphere. While under some circumstances this neglect might be benign, today it is not. Indeed, given the prevailing skepticism about Washington, the SIF's recent Congressional appropriations struggles, and the fast-approaching end of the Obama administration, it is essential that all who genuinely care about accountability in government and the concept of funding programs that really work take notice, digest this rich vein of information, and let your views on its value be known.
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Effective Reading Instruction – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @IntlDyslexia 

Effective Reading Instruction – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @IntlDyslexia  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The most difficult problem for students with dyslexia is learning to read. Unfortunately, popularly employed reading approaches, such as Guided Reading or Balanced Literacy, are not effective for struggling readers. These approaches are especially ineffective for students with dyslexia because they do not focus on the decoding skills these students need to succeed in reading.

What does work is Structured Literacy, which prepares students to decode words in an explicit and systematic manner. This approach not only helps students with dyslexia, but there is substantial evidence that it is more effective for all readers.
Lou Salza's insight:
Structured Literacy as defined by IDA: systematic, explicit, direct instruction in phonology. Research indicates this approach benefits all children learning to read. -Lou
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N'Quavah Velazquez, EdD's curator insight, March 6, 10:50 AM
Structured Literacy as defined by IDA: systematic, explicit, direct instruction in phonology. Research indicates this approach benefits all children learning to read. -Lou
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Assistive Tech webinar on March 23rd w/ @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool  @cdcowen 

Assistive Tech webinar on March 23rd w/ @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool  @cdcowen  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
This webinar will focus on the basics of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and how assistive technology (AT) helps teachers create inclusive classrooms that allow all of their students, including those with dyslexia, to reach academic success. The discussion will address the three principles of UDL and how assistive technology follows those principles. Next, there will be a discussion about the main categories of AT that dyslexic students can use to reach their potentials, including text-to-speech, dictation, word prediction, study skills, and graphic organizers. Finally, the webinar will turn to common myths about dyslexia and assistive technology and why AT should be viewed as a legitimate learning tool.
Lou Salza's insight:
Jamie Martin's work is crucial to our profession! Don't miss this opportunity to promote teaching and learning in every school for every student!--Lou
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 3, 4:49 PM
Jamie Martin's work is crucial to our profession! Don't miss this opportunity to promote teaching and learning in every school for every student!--Lou
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Learn More About Your Child's School Day: Say 'High-Low-High'! @lawrenceschool @vdiffenbacher @_jculp

Learn More About Your Child's School Day: Say 'High-Low-High'! @lawrenceschool @vdiffenbacher @_jculp | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“High-Low-High” structures responses to require one highpoint of the day, one low point, and then another highpoint as a finale. It isn’t foolproof, but does help get the conversation started.

I have three kids – a junior in high school, and a set of 8th grade, boy/girl twins. Rather than asking how their day was, I ask each individually, in turn, to “High-Low-High me.” In fact, my kids will “High-Low-High” me regularly now as well.

This technique has led to the sharing of more details than a “Kay” response has ever given. It has also been effective in prompting conversation on days when there aren’t obvious highs or lows – some days are simply more even keeled. But even those days have some simple moments in them that are better than others, and there certainly is some mental health in appreciating the little things in life.
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Bill Musolf joined Lawrence in June 2007 as the Dean of Students at the Lower School campus. He has been in education since 1993, serving as a school psychologist and elementary guidance counselor. Bill received his bachelor’s degree in Psychology from The Ohio State University, and completed both his master’s and Education Specialist degrees at Michigan State University. He can be contacted at bmusolf@lawrenceschool.org. 

 
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Are there Hidden Advantages of Dyslexia? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen TY! @dyslexicadv

Are there Hidden Advantages of Dyslexia? @lawrenceschool @cdcowen TY! @dyslexicadv | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Among dyslexic adults, there seem to be what we've called “MIND” strengths—an acronym that stands for exceptional talents in material, interconnected, narrative and dynamic reasoning. It's these abilities that have likely led to higher numbers of dyslexics thriving in fields such as design, architecture, engineering and entrepreneurship.
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fMRI Brain scans or scams: @nytopinion   @lawrenceschool Do You Believe in God, or Is That a Software Glitch? 

fMRI Brain scans or scams: @nytopinion   @lawrenceschool Do You Believe in God, or Is That a Software Glitch?  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We’ve all seen them, those colorful images that show how our brains “light up” when we’re in love, playing a video game, craving chocolate, etc. Created using functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fM.R.I., these pictures are the basis of tens of thousands of scientific papers, the backdrop to TED talks and supporting evidence in best-selling books that tell us how to maintain healthy relationships, make decisions, market products and lose weight.

But a study published last month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences uncovered flaws in the software researchers rely on to analyze fM.R.I. data. The glitch can cause false positives — suggesting brain activity where there is none — up to 70 percent of the time.
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5 Ways to Design Effective Rewards for Game-Based Learning - SMARTS @SMARTSOnline @lawrenceschool 

5 Ways to Design Effective Rewards for Game-Based Learning - SMARTS @SMARTSOnline @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Learning by playing is a fundamental instinct for humans and harnessing this instinct can be very powerful. This principle is the foundation for game-based learning; however, games are often used in shallow ways that act as a mere band-aid attempting to salvage poor student engagement. (For more on general best practices behind game-based learning, check out Edutopia’s terrific blog.)

One important element to leveraging games successfully is determining what to offer as an appropriate classroom reward. Vicki Davis explores this concept in her article 5 Ways to Design Effective Rewards for Game-Based Learning. She makes many great suggestions; one, in particular, deserves closer inspection to understand how to create rewards that work for all learners.
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 Predicting Student Engagement: @NAISnetwork @GallupEducation @brandonbusteed @lawrenceschool

Brandon Busteed of Gallup Education talks about how the engagement of teachers and staff affects students.
Lou Salza's insight:
Student engagement drives learning. What is the key driver of student engagement? According to Brandon Busteed: faculty engagement!--Any questions? Anyone surprised? --Lou
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Why Do Early-Childhood Programs Rely on Old Brain Science? TY! @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool 

Why Do Early-Childhood Programs Rely on Old Brain Science? TY! @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
"In short, the idea is to invest in different people and programs who understand the science behind child development and give them the ability to test different interventions. Shonkoff isn’t delusional; he knows that trying to convince cash-strapped government officials to fund speculation isn’t going to work. “It really requires a new breed of philanthropy,” he said—investors who made their fortunes in the high-risk, high-yield world of venture capital and are comfortable in that space, for example. The Center on the Developing Child has already begun working with several programs to test the early-childhood R&D concept in what it’s calling an “innovation cluster” in Washington state. The Children’s Home Society piloted a video coaching program there aimed at improving executive function and self-regulation skills (things like self-control and the ability to retain and use new information) in both children and their parents. Parents were filmed interacting with their babies. Instead of focusing on what they did wrong, coaches clipped a few seconds of good interaction and used that to positively reinforce the ways caregivers could help their babies develop. The researchers originally tested the idea primarily with mothers but found, after several adaptations, that it was fathers who had previously been disengaged who benefited the most, which allowed them to tailor the program to dads. A separate intervention to bring mental health services to moms flopped, but when adapted, proved effective when it was targeted at teen moms specifically. There’s “growing interest” in this model of implementing and testing new ideas, said Jason Gortney, the director of the Office of Policy and Innovation at the Children’s Home Society of Washington. But he acknowledges that it takes a willingness to fail and rebound publicly."
Lou Salza's insight:
I found the call to action intriguing--fund programs in same way that venture philanthropists go about determining where to "invest" in social programs. It requires the strength to learn from flops and focus on successes to build strong interventions. --Lou
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Frances's curator insight, May 12, 11:42 AM
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Untangled: The Critical Work of Raising Teenage Girls @LDamour @lawrenceschool 

Untangled: The Critical Work of Raising Teenage Girls @LDamour @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Parents of teenage girls know that their daughters enjoy terrific strengths and face unique challenges as they move through adolescence. Though we often describe the teenage years as stressful, raising a teenage girl doesn't have to feel like a tangled mess. In fact, Lisa Damour says there is a predictable pattern to teenage development, an actual blueprint for how girls develop into thriving adults.
 
Join us for a conversation with Lisa Damour, Ph.D., a Cleveland-based psychologist and ​New York Times ​best-selling author of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood. Dr. Damour blends her clinical experience, time-honored wisdom, and the latest research findings to describe the seven transitions that turn girls into grown-ups. In doing so, she helps parents understand and support their daughters (and sons!) as they navigate the pivotal teenage years.
 
Lou Salza's insight:
An important uplifting message about teen girls and teens of all persuasions including those older folks who love and care for them!
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 Why Finland has the best schools @lawrenceschool 

 Why Finland has the best schools @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

In Finland, children don't receive formal academic training until the age of seven. Until then, many are in day care and learn through play, songs, games and conversation. Most children walk or bike to school, even the youngest. School hours are short and homework is generally light.

Unlike in the United States, where many schools are slashing recess, schoolchildren in Finland have a mandatory 15-minute outdoor free-play break every hour of every day. Fresh air, nature and regular physical activity breaks are considered engines of learning. According to one Finnish maxim, "There is no bad weather. Only inadequate clothing."

One evening, I asked my son what he did for gym that day. "They sent us into the woods with a map and compass and we had to find our way out," he said.

Finland doesn't waste time or money on low-quality mass standardised testing. Instead, children are assessed every day, through direct observation, check-ins and quizzes by the highest-quality "personalised learning device" ever created - flesh-and-blood teachers.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 6, 1:20 PM
Two key points emerged. First, students need teachers, flesh-and-blood teachers to be exact. Second, the Howard Gardner quote is important. We can learn something from the Finns. We cannot and should not take everything they do and impose it in our schools. What works best is adapting what they do to what we need. It is about asking questions. What does play look like for our children? How do we reduce testing and homework, even eliminate it? It takes leadership rather than management which is what many schools in North America have in place.
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DC's Children's Business Fair featuring Little Loft founder and entrepreneur Lia Salza Goldstein  @lawrenceschool @NAISnetwork

DC's Children's Business Fair featuring Little Loft founder and entrepreneur Lia Salza Goldstein  @lawrenceschool @NAISnetwork | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Join us for the Acton Children's Business Fair launch party, where you will:

Hear the inspirational story of entrepreneur Lia Salza Goldstein, founder of Little Loft, a neighborhood art space for parents and children with locations in Washington, DC and Oregon

Learn the "3 Magic Seeds" of starting a business

Meet other young entrepreneurs and get your questions about Acton Children's Business Fair answered

WHEN
Saturday, April 16, 2016 from 3:30 PM to 4:30 PM (EDT) - Add to Calendar
WHERE
Washington - Tenleytown Library 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW, Washington, DC 20016 - View Map
Lou Salza's insight:
Daughter Lia is hitting her stride in the National Capital Region: branches of Little Loft now in Portland, Takoma Park and Capitol Hill. How about Cleveland, Lia!?
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Habits for success in school and life: instituteforhabitsofmind.com/ @lawrenceschool 

Habits for success in school and life: instituteforhabitsofmind.com/ @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The 16 Habits of Mind are drawn from a modern view of intelligence that casts off traditional abilities-centered theories and replaces them with a growth mindset for remaining open to continuous learning, another important habit. These habits are often called soft skills or non-cognitive skills. In fact, these skills are among the most difficult to develop because they require a great deal of consciousness. Ultimately, they become an internal compass that helps us answer the question, “What is the most ‘thought-full’ thing that I can do right now?”
Lou Salza's insight:
Nothing "soft" or "non-Cognitive" about the these habits of mind! Could these be useful in developing rubrics and standards for proficiency based assessments and transcripts? --Lou
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Rina Answer's curator insight, March 22, 9:12 PM

In 5 years I will have finished my dual Bachelor of Accident Forensics/OH&S Degree. Although fingers crossed I will be working full-time in the police force. I hope to continue learning by doing part-time studies at whichever University I’ll be in the vicinity of. Continuous learning is very important for me as it signifies that you are open to change and growth, both of which are unavoidable in current society. As this Scoop presents, this is an important habit that individuals need to possess to be successful in life.

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Is Homework wrecking our kids? @lawrenceschool 

Is Homework wrecking our kids? @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
“There is no evidence that any amount of homework improves the academic performance of elementary students.”

This statement, by homework research guru Harris Cooper, of Duke University, is startling to hear, no matter which side of the homework debate you’re on. Can it be true that the hours of lost playtime, power struggles and tears are all for naught? That millions of families go through a nightly ritual that doesn’t help? Homework is such an accepted practice, it’s hard for most adults to even question its value.

When you look at the facts, however, here’s what you find: Homework has benefits, but its benefits are age dependent.
Lou Salza's insight:
Homework is much more about compliance than it is about competence. The 'Homework wars' are destroying family life as well as torturing children. --Lou
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Philippe Colinot's curator insight, March 11, 3:24 AM
Homework is much more about compliance than it is about competence. The 'Homework wars' are destroying family life as well as torturing children. --Lou
Decoding Dyslexia IL 's curator insight, March 13, 5:37 AM
Homework is much more about compliance than it is about competence. The 'Homework wars' are destroying family life as well as torturing children. --Lou
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How widespread is dyslexia? – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

How widespread is dyslexia? – International Dyslexia Association @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Empty description
Lou Salza's insight:
IDA now states that 1 in 5 may have "symptoms of Dyslexia" which is a more defensible position. This prevalence seems reasonable given the ineffective reading instruction that holds children back from achieving benchmark literacy skills in the primary grades. --Lou
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President Signs Smith Dyslexia Bill Into Law @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers

President Signs Smith Dyslexia Bill Into Law @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The READ Act requires the president’s annual budget request to Congress to include the Research in Disabilities Education program of the National Science Foundation (NSF). As amended, the bill requires the NSF to devote at least $2.5 million annually to dyslexia research, which would focus on best practices in the following areas:

•Early identification of children and students with dyslexia

•Professional development about dyslexia for teachers and administrators

•Curricula development and evidence-based educational tools for children with dyslexia
Lou Salza's insight:

While I am happy to read this news: I am mindful that legislation and research in the past--as good as they can be for illuminating best practices, do not guarantee implementation or execution in our schools. Time to double down on school to school, door to door, teacher to teacher advocacy for evidence based reading approaches in grades K-4 and early and frequent screening to make sure children are making progress towards literacy benchmarks. In those situations where they are not, intervention needs to be swift, intense and delivered by a knowledgeable teacher. --Lou 

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