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Billy Bob Thornton Talks About Dyslexia & A teacher who encouraged him in his Arkansas high school

Billy Bob Thornton talks with Harvey Hubbell V about dyslexia in an excerpt from the film, Dislecksia: The Movie.

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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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TY! @drseide for New ADA Guidelines for Students With Dyslexia & other LDs @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

TY! @drseide for New ADA Guidelines for Students With Dyslexia & other LDs @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The U.S. Department of Justice has released final regulations for the Americans with Disabilities Act that focus on improving conditions, achievement for students with dyslexia and other learning disorders.

"The new regulation guide and letter to school districts address problematic policies which have required students and their families to undergo repeated costly testing for documentation of dyslexia, dysgraphia,dyscalculia, and other LDs,” says DyslexicAdvantage.org.

The guide also attempts to fix the problem of students with learning disabilities not being supported until they repeatedly fail; test accommodations should be made to reflect aptitude and achievement levels.
Lou Salza's insight:

At last! Common sense approach to a common problem that has plagued our students for decades!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"The new guidelines also help students with disabilities circumvent the difficult process of being asked to provide extensive documentation for testing accommodations by defining limits.If a candidate requests the same testing accommodations he or she previously received on a similar standardized exam or high-stakes test, provides proof of having received the previous testing accommodations, and certifies his or her current need for the testing accommodations due to disability, then a testing entity should generally grant the same testing accommodations for the current standardized exam or high-stakes test without requesting further documentation from the candidate. So, for example, a person with a disability who receives a testing accommodation to sit for the SAT should generally get the same testing accommodation to take the GRE, LSAC, or MCAT."

- See more at: http://www.educationworld.com/a_news/ada-releases-new-guidelines-students-dyslexia-other-learning-disabilities-66268031#sthash.OHsYJPYt.dpuf

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.@CBSTHISMORNING tomorrow: @LDamour author, #UNTANGLED Guiding Girls Through the 7 Transitions to Adulthood @lawrenceschool -

.@CBSTHISMORNING tomorrow: @LDamour author, #UNTANGLED Guiding Girls Through the 7 Transitions to Adulthood @lawrenceschool - | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

To celebrate the publication date of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions Into Adulthood I'll be joining anchors Charlie Rose, Norah O'Donnell, and Gayle King on CBS THIS MORNING for an interview tomorrow. Look for me (or set your DVR!) between 8:00 and 8:45 a.m.

You can see reviews of the book and my upcoming speaking schedule at drlisadamour.com
 
With best wishes,
Lisa

Lisa Damour, PhD
216.548.7367
drlisadamour.com
Author of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood
(Ballantine, February 2016)
Follow me on Twitter, Facebook, and at the New York Times.

Lou Salza's insight:

Lisa is a friend and colleague whose work supports schools and families all over NEOH. She is the Director of the Center for Research on Girls at Laurel School. Her new book Untangled is due out this week! Don't miss Lisa--and get the book!--Lou 

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How Measurement Fails Doctors and Teachers By ROBERT M. WACHTER @nytimes @lawrenceschool @mmorino

How Measurement Fails Doctors and Teachers By ROBERT M. WACHTER @nytimes @lawrenceschool @mmorino | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Avedis Donabedian, a professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health, was a towering figure in the field of quality measurement. He developed what is known as Donabedian’s triad, which states that quality can be measured by looking at outcomes (how the subjects fared), processes (what was done) and structures (how the work was organized). In 2000, shortly before he died, he was asked about his view of quality. What this hard-nosed scientist answered is shocking at first, then somehow seems obvious.

“The secret of quality is love,” he said.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thoughtful commentary!--Lou

Excerpt:

".....Measurement cannot go away, but it needs to be scaled back and allowed to mature. We need more targeted measures, ones that have been vetted to ensure that they really matter. In medicine, for example, measuring the rates of certain hospital-acquired infections has led to a greater emphasis on prevention and has most likely saved lives. On the other hand, measuring whether doctors documented that they provided discharge instructions to heart failure or asthma patients at the end of their hospital stay sounds good, but turns out to be an exercise in futile box-checking, and should be jettisoned.

 

We also need more research on quality measurement and comparing different patient populations. The only way to understand whether a high mortality rate, or dropout rate, represents poor performance is to adequately appreciate all of the factors that contribute to these outcomes — physical and mental, social and environmental — and adjust for them. It’s like adjusting for the degree of difficulty when judging an Olympic diver. We’re getting better at this, but we’re not good enough...."

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Karina Eide Young Writers Competition - Students with Dyslexia @drseide @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

Karina Eide Young Writers Competition - Students with Dyslexia @drseide @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Dyslexic Advantage, a leading charitable organization dedicated to the education and support of individuals with dyslexia, is pleased to announce the official opening of the 2nd Annual Karina Eide Young Writers Awards, a competition open exclusively to students with dyslexia. Students from public and private schools and homeschooling students are all welcome.
Cash prizes and honorable mentions will be awarded to student entrants who demonstrate creativity and excellence in writing. All styles and genres are welcome, including fan fiction, short stories and poetry as well as chapter excerpts from longer works. Non-cash prizes, including certificates of special recognition, will also be awarded.
Unlike other writing competitions, submission to the Karina Eide Young Dyslexic Writers Awards will not be judged based on spelling or grammar. Rather, entries will be evaluated on the basis of creativity, humor, storytelling ability and other aspects of quality writing. Entrants are allowed to either type their works or dictate them, whichever they prefer.
Lou Salza's insight:

Brock and Fernette Eide are doing remarkable work re-framing the conversation around dyslexia and dyslexics.--Lou 

Excerpt:

"At Dyslexic Advantage, our mission is to help recognize and encourage the talents and strengths that come from this amazing community, " comments the organization's co-founder, Dr. Fernette Eide. "Our Karina Young Writers Awards helps us celebrate young dyslexic writers' creativity and encourage greater expression without the restraints of conventional writing competitions."

All entries must be submitted no later than January 21st. Winners will be announced on March 15th. To learn more about the awards or to submit an entry, please visit:

http://bit.ly/karina-awards

Contact: 
Fernette Eide M.D., Co-Founder 
Dyslexic Advantage 
Voice Phone: 1-800-757-8310 x 705 
Fax Number: 425-609-0050 
Email: drseide(at)dyslexicadvantage(dot)org 
Website: http://dyslexicadvantage.org

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What’s Worth Learning in School? — David Perkins, @ProjectZeroHGSE @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

What’s Worth Learning in School? — David Perkins, @ProjectZeroHGSE @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We teach a lot that isn’t going to matter, in a significant way, in students’ lives, writes Professor David Perkins in his new book, “Future Wise.” There’s also much we aren’t teaching that would be a better return on investment.
Professor David Perkins likes to tell this story: Indian leader Mahatma Gandhi was getting on a train. One of his sandals slipped off and fell to the ground. The train was moving, and there was no time to go back. Without hesitation, Gandhi took off his second sandal and threw it toward the first. Asked by his colleague why he did that, he said one sandal wouldn’t do him any good, but two would certainly help someone else.
As Perkins writes in his new book, Future Wise, “People cherish the story as a marvelous example of a charitable act. And so it is, on a small scale, seizing a singular moment.”
But as he also points out, and as he told an audience at the Future of Learning institute held this past summer at the Ed School, it was more than that: It was also a knowledgeable act. By throwing that sandal, Gandhi had two important insights: He knew what people in the world needed, and he knew what to let go of.
Lou Salza's insight:

 By David Perkins HGSE  Research Professor of Teaching and Learning, Learning and Teaching Program, Technology, Innovation, and Education Program, Project Zero

 

Perkins challenges the assumptions we make--and the design of curriculum that promote narrow views of information retention, achievement, and expertise. He compares our schools' curricumul to a a garage with old stuff we no longer need--and suggests we start clearing it out!--Lou

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There are 1,000 Reasons to Give. What's Yours? - YouTube @lawrenceschool

During this giving season, please consider supporting the Annual Fund at Lawrence School: www.lawrenceschool.org/give

The Annual Fund supports every aspect of our school, including leading-edge assistive technology; extracurricular, fine arts and athletic programs; specialized teacher professional development; and tuition assistance.

Lou Salza's insight:

My reason to give? Lawrence School changes the way students think of themselves and one another. The change is visible, audible, and transformative. This change fosters confidence, and confidence makes a thousand possibilities for every student become real. Congratulations to Paul Warner and all the students, parents and staff who produced a sweet annual appeal for Lawrence School!--Lou

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7 Animated GIFs Will help You Understand Trigonometry @lawrenceschool

7 Animated GIFs Will help You Understand Trigonometry @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Trigonometry is the branch of math that studies triangles, with a particular focus on the relationships between angles and the lengths of corresponding sides.

Interestingly enough, the trigonometric functions that define those relationships are also closely tied to circles.

Needless to say, this makes trig one of the hardest topics in math for students to grasp intuitively.

Part of that is the way it's taught. Students are taught the "unit circle" and its relationship to trigonometry, but many fail to make the leap on how crucial circles are for trig functions.

With static graphs and equations, it's possible to get a handle on the rules of what various functions do and mean. However, it's still hard to get an intuitive sense of the relationship between the circle and the trigonometric functions and the triangles.

That all changes with animated GIFs. Change over time is crucial to understanding trig. With pictures like these — found on Imgur from an album linked in Reddit's peerless Math subreddit — trig becomes a breeze.
Lou Salza's insight:

Love these animated illustrations of Trig!-Lou

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Assistive Technology: Resource Roundup @lawrenceschool @ATDyslexia @cdcowen

Assistive Technology: Resource Roundup @lawrenceschool @ATDyslexia @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Discover websites, blogs, articles, and videos that provide information and tools related to understanding, selecting, and assessing assistive technology.
 
Lou Salza's insight:

Great resources and recommendations.--Lou

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Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions by @eduardobricen0 #growthmindset @lawrenceschool @mindsetworks @cdcowen

Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions by @eduardobricen0 #growthmindset @lawrenceschool @mindsetworks @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Growth Mindset Enables Change

Research has shown that developing a growth mindset is beneficial in a variety of contexts, from education to the workplace to interpersonal relationships to sports to health. It leads people to take on challenges they can learn from, to find more effective ways to improve, to persevere in the face of setbacks, and to make greater progress, all of which we need to further cultivate in education. Furthermore, there is evidence that its benefits are most pronounced for people who face negative stereotypes, such as underserved minorities and females in STEM, and as a result growth mindset efforts can narrow the achievement gap.

Let’s Learn Together

Growth mindset is a seemingly simple concept, but there is a lot of nuance to the framework and its applications. I hope that this article helps clarify common misconceptions. We invite people to continue diving deeper into this body of work and engage in explorations together. We welcome further feedback because it takes a village, or more precisely, all of us, to foster better learning.
Lou Salza's insight:

Important article by Eduardo Briceño, the Co-Founder & CEO of Mindset Works, which he created with Carol Dweck, Lisa Blackwell and others to help people develop as motivated and effective learners, including educators.


Mindset by Carol Dweck is a must read-must understand book! The idea that growth mindset is  just for our students and not for teachers and parents misses the point of Dweck's work. There is  tendency for powerful paradigms like 'fixed and growth mindset' to become oversimplified and as a result, underutilized.  I liked this article because it got to the heart of some of the confusion and over simplification in our profession around Carol Dweck's work. The bottom line: If you have a fixed mindset about your own capacity you are probably not an engaged learner. If you are not an engaged learner,  you are probably not a successful teacher. --Lou 

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LORENA GIMENEZ MAICAS's curator insight, November 16, 2015 2:10 PM

fomento de un nuevo aprendizaje

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Do You Know Which Tech Tool Is Right For Your Learner? @lawrenceschool @ATDyslexia @JhJhersh

Do You Know Which Tech Tool Is Right For Your Learner? @lawrenceschool @ATDyslexia @JhJhersh | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

At Lawrence School, we are fortunate to have a team of dedicated, talented and enthusiastic technology experts on staff. Jackie Hersh, our Director of Assistive Technology and Learning Support, offered the following tips to help parents navigate these seemingly murky waters:

Consider your student first.

 

Understanding your child’s strengths and weaknesses is the most important consideration when determining which assistive technology tool to implement. For instance, if you have a child who struggles using a touch pad, you may want to consider a touch screen or a mouse. Likewise, a student who struggles with reading but has strong listening skills may benefit from the use of audio books or a text-to-speech app.
Understand the environment where the device will be used. Some environments will impact the use of the device. Consider whether your student will have access to Wi-Fi at school, which is required for some programs and apps. Speech-to-text software is an excellent tool, however in a class of 30 students its benefits would be very limited. Additionally, if personal devices are not allowed, bringing your iPad loaded with the best programs would be pointless.


Keep the task in mind.

 

It’s easy to get excited about a shiny new tool, but your child’s academic task or need must come first. One way to keep the task at the forefront is to use the teacher’s directions and expectations as a guide. IEP objectives are also a great starting point for identifying tasks.--By Jackie Hersh

Lou Salza's insight:

Many thanks to our Technology staff: Sally Garza, Jason Sepsi, and Jackie Hersh for an informative and inspiring session on the variety of tools available to help our students navigate academic environments!--Lou

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How Can We Harness the Power of Learning Beyond the School Day? By @Kschwart @lawrenceschool.org

How Can We Harness the Power of Learning Beyond the School Day? By @Kschwart @lawrenceschool.org | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Discussions of learning tend to focus on what happens in schools, but many students are learning lots of important skills outside of school through extracurriculars like sports, music, art, politics or any other passion. Often students don’t get recognition for the learning they pursue on their own, and many times they don’t even see their passion as learning at all. The Chicago City of Learning project is trying to meet that need by helping connect youth to resources that support their interests and provide validation for the hard work that goes into learning outside the academic setting.
Lou Salza's insight:

Participation in extra-curricular programs draws upon and further develops skills and talents that students come to school with but sometimes go unrecognized during the highly scheduled school day. Yet we know it is in  activities, teams and service clubs where students hone the skills that will support career success and civic engagement later in their lives as adults.These are as important--maybe more important --than academic obtainment. --Lou

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What Is ADHD? - 3 minute video:YouTube @DrThomasEBrown @UnderstoodOrg @lawrenceschool

What is ADHD, otherwise known as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder? Hear from expert Thomas E. Brown, PhD, on what causes ADHD and ADD, as well as its signs and symptoms, including inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.

Lou Salza's insight:

Nice summary--Thank you to all the folks at Understood.org!!--Lou

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, November 1, 2015 8:35 PM

The question I have is if there is any research on inaccurate diagnosis of ADHD.  -Lon

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How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty @LindaFlanagan2 @lawrenceschool

How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty @LindaFlanagan2 @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Address the emotional impact of uncertainty. “The emotions of learning are surprise, awe, interest and confusion,” Holmes said. But because confusion provokes discomfort, it should be discussed by teachers to help students handle the inevitable disquiet. “Students have to grow comfortable not just with the idea that failure is a part of innovation, but with the idea that confusion is, too,” Holmes writes. Teachers can help students cope with these feelings by acknowledging their emotional response and encouraging them to view ambiguity as a learning opportunity.

Assign projects that provoke uncertainty. One way to help students grow more comfortable with confusion is to assign projects that are likely to flummox them. Holmes identifies three techniques for doing so: inviting students to find mistakes; asking them to present arguments for alien viewpoints; and providing assignments that students will fail. “The best assignments should make students make mistakes, be confused and feel uncertain,” he said.
Lou Salza's insight:

I believe it fair to say that if you deal with dyslexia, a good deal of time is spent being confused, and trying to sort through ambiguous situations and information.  Some would say that it makes  us (dyslexics) better than the average problem-solver. Others posit  that dyslexia creates increased capacity for dealing with ambiguity and frustration.  A golf pro once explained that he loved coach our golf team because dyslexic students were  'better at handling frustration' and what is golf he offered except a game where you learn to handle frustration!

I would also offer that some of the confusion and frustration dyslexics encounter in the classroom  has more to do with meaningless constraints ( like time limits) imposed in learning environments. These  constrict rather that expand learning opportunities for all students.--Lou 

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.@lawrenceschool #Untangled @LDamour Local author goes national! @CBSThisMorning

.@lawrenceschool #Untangled @LDamour Local author goes national! @CBSThisMorning | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In this sane, highly engaging, and informed guide for parents of daughters, Dr. Damour draws on decades of experience and the latest research to reveal the seven distinct—and absolutely normal—developmental transitions that turn girls into grown-ups, including Parting with Childhood, Contending with Adult Authority, Entering the Romantic World, and Caring for Herself. Providing realistic scenarios and welcome advice on how to engage daughters in smart, constructive ways, Untangled gives parents a broad framework for understanding their daughters while addressing their most common questions, including 
My thirteen-year-old rolls her eyes when I try to talk to her, and only does it more when I get angry with her about it. How should I respond?
Do I tell my teen daughter that I’m checking her phone?
Where’s the line between healthy eating and having an eating disorder?
My daughter’s friend is cutting herself. Do I call the girl’s mother to let her know?
Perhaps most important, Untangled helps mothers and fathers understand, connect, and grow with their daughters. When parents know what makes their daughter tick, they can embrace and enjoy the challenge of raising a healthy, happy young woman.
Lou Salza's insight:

To celebrate the publication date of Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions Into Adulthood Lisa will be joining anchors Charlie Rose, Norah O'Donnell, and Gayle King on CBS THIS MORNING for an interview tomorrow. Look for her (or set your DVR!) between 8:00 and 8:45 a.m.--Lou

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MIT Prof: What Every Person with Dyslexia Should Know by @drseide @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

MIT Prof: What Every Person with Dyslexia Should Know by @drseide @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Superstar MIT Professor Catherine Drennan (HHMI Scientist too – the top of the top in the world) shared her personal journey with dyslexia. She was in remedial classes and had to repeat a grade, and saw her self dropped lower and lower through all the reading groups, until her parents were pulled aside and told “She’s probably not going to be able to graduate from high school…”

Check out Cathy’s advice below and watch her entire story at the bottom of this video!  Cathy’s wisdom is something that everyone with dyslexia should know.
Lou Salza's insight:

If you love someone with dyslexia,  check this out! --Lou 

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Defining My Dyslexia @blakecharlton @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen

Defining My Dyslexia @blakecharlton @lawrenceschool @bnpowers @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I STARTED cataloging insults in the second grade. Notable put-downs heard outside my special-ed classroom included “dimwinky,” “retardochuckles” and “the meat in the sandwich of stupid.” The last of which, if you think about it, is a seriously impressive use of metaphor for a 7-year-old. I learned all the jokes about dyslexia, and told them to better effect than anyone else. Making fun of myself was my best defense. The other choices — hiding from my diagnosis or accepting myself as limited — didn’t appeal.

Fortunately, humor and hard work proved a good strategy. Also helpful were my crafty parents. They often read out loud to me and, noticing my passion for fantasy novels, would stop at the most exciting point in a chapter — then leave the book in case I wanted to read by myself. It wasn’t long before I was sneaking paperbacks into study hall.

Though slow out of the gate — I couldn’t read fluently until 13 — I went to Yale, then medical school at Stanford, and I published two fantasy novels with disabled heroes (think Harry Potter and the Special-Ed Classroom). At every step, I used my diagnosis to my advantage, arguing that I had succeeded despite being dyslexic. It helped me stand out.
Lou Salza's insight:

In case you missed this: Dr. Blake Carlton is the author of the Spellwright Trilogy and a physician--who happens to be dyslexic.

--Lou

http://www.amazon.com/Spellwright-The-Trilogy-Blake-Charlton/dp/0765356589

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Is School Making Our Children Sick? By VICKI ABELES @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers

Is School Making Our Children Sick? By VICKI ABELES @lawrenceschool @cdcowen @ryan_masa @bnpowers | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....54 percent of students showed moderate to severe symptoms of depression. More alarming, 80 percent suffered moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety.

“This is so far beyond what you would typically see in an adolescent population,” he told the school’s faculty at a meeting just before the fall semester began. “It’s unprecedented.” Worse, those alarming figures were probably an underestimation; some students had missed the survey while taking Advanced Placement exams.

What Dr. Slavin saw at Irvington is a microcosm of a nationwide epidemic of school-related stress. We think of this as a problem only of the urban and suburban elite, but in traveling the country to report on this issue, I have seen that this stress has a powerful effect on children across the socioeconomic spectrum.

Expectations surrounding education have spun out of control. On top of a seven-hour school day, our kids march through hours of nightly homework, daily sports practices and band rehearsals, and weekend-consuming assignments and tournaments. Each activity is seen as a step on the ladder to a top college, an enviable job and a successful life. Children living in poverty who aspire to college face the same daunting admissions arms race, as well as the burden of competing for scholarships, with less support than their privileged peers. Even those not bound for college are ground down by the constant measurement in schools under pressure to push through mountains of rote, impersonal material as early as preschool....."

Lou Salza's insight:

I found this article provocative because the author teaches at a medical school and discovered that med students were suffering due to the stresses imposed by the curriculum at the St. Louis School of Medicine.

 

I feel that students with learning differences like dyslexia, ADHD and high functioning autism have been the 'canaries in the coal mine'  of our schools for 4 decades. Is it finally time to take a few steps back and save all children and all students from ridiculous 19th Century requirements to memorize useless information, complete hours of busy work, achieve benchmark scores on high stakes tests, and run the gauntlet we call 'grading' in schools? 

Are we force feeding our children a diet that stifles curiosity and turns them into nervous, exhausted, sleep deprived wrecks? Seems so! --Just sayin'--Lou

 

 

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Five Ways to Help Your Child Conquer Tests, and Learn from Them - @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool

Five Ways to Help Your Child Conquer Tests, and Learn from Them - @anniemurphypaul @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Used correctly, tests can help students achieve three crucial aims: supporting student recall (tests force students to pull information from their own heads, enhancing retention); enhancing their awareness of their own mental processes (in the process of being tested and getting feedback, students fine-tune their sense of what they know and don’t know); and nurturing the noncognitive skills students develop from facing challenges (tests represent a kind of controlled adversity, an ideal arena for honing skills like resilience and perseverance).

In a perfect world, schools, parents and students would consciously treat tests as occasions for learning and growth, focusing less on the result and more on the powerful benefits of simply taking the test in the first place. But no matter how the school approaches testing, parents can help children at all ages use the experiences to learn about the material, about the process of being tested,and about themselves. Here are some strategies for getting the most out of the testing process.
Lou Salza's insight:

"Make tests an opportunity for learning!" Good advice to deal with a necessary part of our academic world at least for the foreseeable future.--Lou 

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Social Media Presents Added Accessibilty for Teens, New Challenges For Parents @lawrenceschool.org

Social Media Presents Added Accessibilty for Teens, New Challenges For Parents @lawrenceschool.org | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Social media presents unique and difficult situations for a community. Given its risks and benefits, how do you find a balance between allowing your child the freedom to use social media and other online tools, while also ensuring their well-being and appropriate behavior?

Here are a few suggestions to consider:

Ask your child about his or her social media use and discuss the dangers and consequences associated with it. Many children simply don’t realize how easily accessible their information is and what harm can be done with it. Talk about how photos they post or comments they make can impact their future. Ask if they have been treated disrespectfully or bullied on social media and make it clear that they can come to you with questions or help. If there are concerns that need to be addressed at school, let administrators know.
Monitor your child’s use of social media periodically by reviewing a snapshot of what your child is posting online. This doesn’t have to be an exhaustive review – just check a few comments and/or postings on a few different sites. Kids with nothing to hide will usually let you check without too much of an argument. If your child is secretive about what they post online or resistant to letting you check, consider that cause for additional review and concern.
Learn all you can about the various forms of social media, as well as their risks and benefits. The better informed you are, the easier it will be to initiate important dialogue with your child. Here are some of the most popular social networks available: Facebook, Twitter,  Instagram, Snapchat, Vine, YouTube, Tumblr.
Share what you learn with other parents and with your child’s school, whenever necessary. The collaboration and open dialogue will benefit everyone.
Lou Salza's insight:

Sage, practical advice! Thank you Mr. Culp!-Lou

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Girls Aren't Meaner Than Boys. It Only Looks That Way. @nytimes By @LDamour @lawrenceschool @CRGLaurelSchool

Girls Aren't Meaner Than Boys. It Only Looks That Way.  @nytimes By @LDamour  @lawrenceschool @CRGLaurelSchool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
So how do we account for girls’ relational infamy? The answer may have little to do with how, or how often, girls are unkind, and more to do with the chain reaction that is set off when girls are on the sharp end of a peer’s stick.

Evidence suggests that girls, more than boys, are injured by social mistreatment. We’ve long known that girls place a higher premium on their interpersonal relationships than boys do, so it follows that they become more upset when their relational ties are threatened. Indeed, research finds that, disproportionately, girls harbor painful thoughts and feelings when hurt by their peers. They fret about why they were targeted, wonder if they had it coming, and strategize about how to befriend the antagonist.

To soothe their bruised feelings girls, more than boys, reach out to their friends . Turning to peers puts girls in touch with valuable social support, but we also know that recruiting friends to analyze social slights in detail can actually deepen a girl’s emotional distress. In contrast, boys who are hurt often seek out distractions — they stop thinking about hard feelings by thinking about something else. This may render boys less fluent in the language of their emotions, but they tend to feel better, faster.
Lou Salza's insight:

Lisa Damour hits another one out of the park!-Lou

 

Lisa Damour is a psychologist in private practice in Shaker Heights, Ohio, a clinical instructor at Case Western Reserve University and the director of Laurel School’s Center for Research on Girls. Her forthcoming book, Untangled: Guiding Teenage Girls Through the Seven Transitions into Adulthood, will be available in February 2016. Follow her on Twitter: @LDamour.

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Speaking with your child about the Paris attacks by @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool @AssetsSchool

Speaking with your child about the Paris attacks by @Ryan_Masa @lawrenceschool @AssetsSchool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"....Keep routines.  

At home, just like at school, routines can be very comforting, especially for anxious children.  Of course, be flexible enough to respond to the needs that your child is presenting with. For example, kids may have a more difficult time than usual getting ready for bed or falling asleep.
Be careful not to stereotype. This applies to countries, ethnicities and religions.  Children, even older ones, can easily generalize negative comments. Help children differentiate between fact and opinion. Remind them of the quote, “everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.”  When wanting to express an opinion, prompt children to start statements with “I believe” or “I think.”


Support children who want to do something more tangible.  

Older children in particular often want to take action.  Sometimes this is a longer, more in-depth conversation. If so, be a good listener to their ideas and recommendations for making the world a safer place. Often, children want to do something that helps or memorializes the victims. These acts often provide children a sense of control during a vulnerable time, or a sense of closure.


Acknowledge the acts of humanity.   

Sometimes when we’re lost, we need to look toward our moral mentors. For us of a certain age, Mr. Rogers visited our living rooms each day with messages of peace and community.  In thinking about Paris, I’m reminded of Mr. Fred Rogers wise words about scary news:  

“When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, “Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.” To this day, especially in times of “disaster,” I remember my mother’s words and I am always comforted by realizing that there are still so many helpers – so many caring people in this world.”

Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you, Ryan, for such a timely, well written thoughtful piece about how to help our children ( and ourselves) with such a challenging and scary topic.--Lou

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A New Way to Improve College Enrollment @lawrenceschool

A New Way to Improve College Enrollment @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

AMERICAN public schools do a good job of getting students into college, but a poor job preparing them to succeed once they’re there. While more than two-thirds of high school graduates enroll in college, nearly two-thirds of those arrive on campus unprepared for college-level rigor.

Instead of trying to solve this problem together, high schools and colleges typically operate in silos — high schools concentrate on increasing graduation rates, while universities pay little attention to what’s happening in the local public schools.

The situation is entirely different in Long Beach, Calif. In that predominantly immigrant city south of Los Angeles, where a third of the children under age 17 live in poverty, the public schools have teamed up with the local community college and the state university to confront the impact of poverty, racial discrimination and limited educational opportunities.


David L. Kirp

Lou Salza's insight:

Often one obstacle or problem can derail freshmen, particularly those at risk because of risk factors like executive function vulnerabilities, language learning differences or poverty. This story offers hope and a program! --Lou

 

Excerpt:

".....The Long Beach collaboration offers a textbook illustration of what business gurus call “continuous improvement.” The willingness of educators, from pre-K to Ph.D., to shelve their egos and do right by the community makes all the difference...."

David L. Kirp, a public policy professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and senior fellow at the Learning Policy Institute, is a contributing writer.

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Odyssey with Dyslexia - The Literacy Excellence Program at District 49's Odyssey Elementary School in Colorado @lawrenceschool

LEx Program at District 49's Odyssey Elementary School in Colorado offers programming to all students ensuring that primary grade children learn how to read. Teachers are given the training and tools they need to address all learners including those who show signs of language learning differences like dyslexia!

Lou Salza's insight:

Let me understand this--a public school in a district with a commitment to have all children learn to read? A public school that trains and supports their teachers in differentiating instruction ( shifting content, process and products) to bring every child through reading at their pace in their way? Really!?

Can I get a Hallelujah!??--Lou

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Justice Department: New Rules for Rights to Testing Accommodations @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

Justice Department: New Rules for Rights to Testing Accommodations @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
on September 8, the Department of Justice (DOJ) issued a set of rules to clarify how to manage issues that come up. The rules also contain new and updated requirements around what documentation can be used to determine if a student qualifies for accommodations.

This has been one of the major trouble spots for students and parents—getting accommodations approved without having to provide additional information.

They also address another common trouble spot: Being approved in time for the accommodations to be used. The DOJ says that testing services need to give students answers to their requests for accommodations more promptly.

Some other important highlights of the new rules include:

Students don’t have to repeatedly apply to keep accommodations. Proof of past accommodations is “generally” enough to keep them in place.
Students who receive testing accommodations under an IEP or a 504 plan should “generally” have the same accommodations for standardized exams or high-stakes tests.
Students can’t be denied accommodations just because they’re doing well academically. And the way a student’s test scores are reported can’t indicate that the student used accommodations or flag that he has a disability.
Lou Salza's insight:

Can we all say in unisun " It's about time"!--Lou

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IEP Roadmap: How to Seek Out Special Education Services for Your Child @UnderstoodOrg @lawrenceschool

IEP Roadmap: How to Seek Out Special Education Services for Your Child @UnderstoodOrg  @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Getting an IEP may seem complicated. But the process boils down to a few key questions. Use this flowchart to find out how to get your child special education services.
Lou Salza's insight:

Love this illustration/flowchart/infographic! Easy to follow--simple and direct.  Of course, the actual process once you are in it is unclear and often confusing. Keep this road map on the frig and don't get discouraged! --Lou

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