Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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James Middleton: How I battled dyslexia to read at Kate and Prince William's wedding... - Daily Mail

James Middleton: How I battled dyslexia to read at Kate and Prince William's wedding... - Daily Mail | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
When James Middleton walked down the aisle of Westminster Abbey to deliver his reading at the marriage of his sister – to a global television audience of two billion – he had more reason than most to be gripped by anxiety.
He knew the eyes of the world were upon him but it was his own struggle with reading that was his biggest concern.
His reading turned out to be a masterclass in measured oratory, made all the more remarkable by the fact that James still struggles to read because of his dyslexia – a broad term to describe a common learning difficulty.

 

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2224101/James-Middleton-How-I-battled-crucifying-dyslexia-read-Kate-Williams-wedding.html#ixzz2AdggvZEa
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
Stories of success for at risk learners in the nation's schools
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Assistive Technology to Help Students Succeed This Year @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool

Assistive Technology to Help Students Succeed This Year @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Find out which assistive technology tools can address your child’s specific needs in this live expert chat.

Jamie Martin Assistive Technology Consultant and Trainer Thu Sep 07 at 12:00pm ET

Lou Salza's insight:
Jamie Martin Assistive Technology Consultant and Trainer 
 Thu Sep 07 at 12:00pm ET 
 Are you searching for the right assistive technology (AT) for your child? 
Join this expert chat with Jamie Martin, AT consultant and trainer, to find out which AT tools might address your child’s specific needs and challenges this year. 

 Simply go to live.understood.org at the time of the chat.
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Six Secrets to Private Schools' Success, and How Public Schools Can Steal Them @lawrenceschool 

Six Secrets to Private Schools' Success, and How Public Schools Can Steal Them @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In the end, there are fewer essential differences between public and private schools than one might expect. They are all ultimately teaching and learning communities. The best public school administrators already know how to create small pockets of flexibility for key initiatives like these, which are everyday practice at private schools. It is time for our districts and school boards to take note and help create more such opportunities.
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Gov. Dan Malloy #MyYoungerSelf great message!  @lawrenceschool 

We asked Dan Malloy what he would tell his younger self about his struggles with mental health. Here’s what he said! Check back to see who’s message we’l
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This is a wonderful series!--Lou
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Opinion | Ending the Curse of Remedial Math

Opinion | Ending the Curse of Remedial Math | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it


"CUNY Start holds some clues on how to solve an education crisis. Nationwide, only 35 percent of those who start community college receive any form of credential within six years. At urban community colleges, the six-year graduation rate is only 16 percent. ....


The biggest academic stumbling blocks are remedial math and English courses. More than two-thirds of community college students must take at least one such class, and there they languish. Only a third of those referred to remedial math, and less than half those who take remedial reading, pass. Just 15 percent of students who take remedial classes at two-year colleges earn a certificate or degree on time. ....


The CUNY Start model is different. Full-time students are exclusively in Start classes for 25 hours a week — substantially more than the usual course load — for one semester. The focus is on thinking, not memorization. “Math isn’t just memorization,” Ms. Fells told me. “I teach them how to investigate problems — how to think."

Lou Salza's insight:
High School and College math requirements are used to "sort" students in the USA. Those with privilege attend schools where they are steeped in skills and effective curriculum. Those in stressed communities with poor schools fall behind early and stay behind. CUNY offers a model that we ought to pay close attention to and use everywhere to change the trajectory of high school students and at risk college matriculants. Oh and while we are at it--why not change how we teach math to children in the primary grades and all through elementary school. Let's teach children to think and quit teaching math like it is a guessing game requiring excessive memorization of math facts. --Lou
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25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy @lawrenceschool 

25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Question stems can be a powerful part of that process no matter where the learner is. Assessment (pre-assessment, self-assessment, formative and summative assessment), prompting and cueing during discussion, etc. In that light, the following 25+ question stems framed around the early, non-revised Bloom’s Taxonomy are worth a gander.
Lou Salza's insight:
Nice Review!--Lou
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Mississippi Expands Private School Funding for Dyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen

Mississippi Expands Private School Funding for Dyslexia @lawrenceschool @cdcowen | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi is expanding a program that lets students with dyslexia receive state money to attend private schools.

Republican Gov. Phil Bryant signed House Bill 1046 on April 13, and it becomes law July 1.

Until now, students could only receive state money through sixth grade to attend a handful of state-accredited special private schools for children with learning disabilities.

The new law will expand the availability of state money through 12th grade.

The Mississippi Department of Education says 160 children statewide currently receive the aid.
Lou Salza's insight:
In OH families are fortunate to have a similar program named after the Representative that introduced the legislation: The John Peterson Special Needs Scholarship. Ohio provides about 4,000 scholarships to students ranging from $7,100 to $27,000 depending of the classification on the IEP. This is another great reason to live in NE OH! -Lou
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Lawrence School, OH Searches for Head of School for July 2018 @lawrenceschool

Lawrence School, OH Searches for Head of School for July 2018 @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
The Head of School reports to a 23-member Board of Trustees, comprised of parents and alumni parents as well as professionals from the community who care deeply about children and families struggling with learning differences. For Lawrence’s next leader the Board seeks an individual of outstanding character, whose strategic educational and strategic fiscal management skills match the school’s culture and who will inspire and enable Lawrence School to achieve its vision for the future. Preferably, the next Head will have a background in working with students with learning differences and will fully appreciate the unique considerations of the families of these students.

Candidates interested in this position are asked to contact:
John Mackenzie, Partner, Educators’ Collaborative, LLC. email: jmackenzie@educatorscollaborative.com, phone: 614-207-1006
Lou Salza's insight:
Candidates interested in this position are asked to contact: John Mackenzie, Partner, Educators’ Collaborative, LLC. email: jmackenzie@educatorscollaborative.com, phone: 614-207-1006
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Great advice from @LDamour 8 Ways to Help Your Daughter Deal with Mean Girls @lawrenceschool

Great advice from @LDamour 8 Ways to Help Your Daughter Deal with Mean Girls @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Your Mama Bear instinct is to protect your cub, and all you want is to hunt down that hateful girl and have her for lunch. Well, calm down and keep your claws and jaws to yourself. "The biggest mistake moms make is to become emotionally triggered," says family therapist Lucie Hemmen, Ph.D., author of The Teen Girl's Survival Guide and Parenting a Teen Girl: A Crash Course in Conflict, Communication, and Connection with your Teen Daughter. On top of raging maternal instinct, memories of your own girlhood pain start to emerge. These roiling emotions make it hard to focus on your daughter and may make her question if you can be the grounded, helpful resource she needs.
Lou Salza's insight:
All parents can help build resilience in their children when they complain about issues at school by simply acknowledging the issues and asking: " who at school can help you"? A confidential call to the school to alert us to the situation will help school personnel to recognize and support students in their work to resolve problems. 
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Buy a $10 raffle ticket support @Lawrenceschool maybe Win a 2017 Honda Civic LX or $15,000! 

Buy a $10 raffle ticket support @Lawrenceschool maybe Win a 2017 Honda Civic LX or $15,000!  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Tickets are $10. Proceeds benefit the Paul Matia Scholarship and Lawrence School. Winner will be announced May 6, 2017 at Bloom.
Lou Salza's insight:
Great school, nice ride, cheap ticket!--Lou
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Assistive Technology for Writing @understood.org @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool

Assistive Technology for Writing @understood.org @ATDyslexia @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Find out about assistive technology possibilities for writing issues during this live expert chat.
Lou Salza's insight:
No one better with this technology than Jamie! This technology levels the playing field for students with dyslexia and changes the way kids think about themselves as learners. --Lou
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Our New Research @CommonSenseEd Shows How Kids Consume and Think About the News @lawrenceschool

Our New Research @CommonSenseEd Shows How Kids Consume and Think About the News @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
News and America's Kids surveyed 853 children age 10–18 to find out where they get news, which news sources (including social media sites) they prefer, how much they trust the news, and how they feel about the news. It's clear from the results that news is not only for adults. Many children say following the news is important to them and that they feel smarter when they get the news. However, many kids feel that their voices aren't represented in news coverage and that news organizations don't understand their experiences. Check out the infographic that illustrates the results of the survey. Here are some of the key findings:

Kids value the news. About half of kids say that following the news is important to them, and more than two-thirds say that consuming news makes them feel smart and knowledgeable. Half of the children surveyed feel that following the news helps them feel prepared to make a difference in their communities.

Kids feel neglected and misrepresented. Nearly three quarters of surveyed kids think that the media should show more people their age, rather than grown-ups talking about them. Additionally, 69 percent say that the news media has no idea about the experiences of people their age, and less than half think the news covers issues that matter to them.

Kids see racial and gender bias in the news. Half of children agree with the statement "Whenever I see an African-American or Latino person in the news, they're usually involved in crimes, violence, or other problems." And only one in three kids agrees that the news treats women and men equally fairly.

What kids are seeing scares them and makes them feel depressed. Content can be disturbing, causing most kids to feel afraid, angry, and/or sad or depressed. Tweens are more likely than teens to say that the news makes them feel afraid.

Kids also often are fooled by fake news. Less than half of children agree that they can tell fake news stories from real ones. Experiences with fake news may be a reason that only one in four kids puts "a lot" of trust in the information they receive from news organizations. Learn how to help kids spot fake news.

Kids trust family for news (but still prefer to get it from social media). Sixty-six percent say they trust the news they hear from family "a lot," with teachers being the second-most-trusted source. However, when asked to select their preferred news source, online news sources win out.

These findings speak to the importance of supporting tweens' and teens' media-literacy skills -- the critical thinking needed to judge the value of information. In the short term, that means that when kids come across a suspicious news story on Facebook, they need to know how to interpret the information and whether it's worth sharing. In the long term, that means teaching them to question what they see, hear, and interact with to become not only good citizens but good digital citizens. Common Sense has a number of resources to help students develop the tools they need to thrive as 21st-century citizens. And since the No. 1 place kids hear about news is from the adults in their lives, we need to model how to consume news, encourage kids to think critically about sources, and discuss the news with the children in our lives.
Lou Salza's insight:
Check this out  (3 minute video loop)and focus  more on student needs when assign "current events".--Lou
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Yasmine Nouar's curator insight, April 1, 8:07 AM
Check this out  (3 minute video loop)and focus  more on student needs when assign "current events".--Lou
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Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart @lawrenceschool 

Too Many Kids Quit Science Because They Don't Think They're Smart @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For most students, science, math, engineering, and technology (STEM) subjects are not intuitive or easy. Learning in general—and STEM in particular—requires repeated trial and error, and a student’s lack of confidence can sometimes stand in her own way. And although teachers and parents may think they are doing otherwise, these adults inadvertently help kids make up their minds early on that they're not natural scientists or “math people,” which leads them to pursue other subjects instead.

So what's the best way to help kids feel confident enough to stay the STEM course? To answer this question, I spoke with Carol Dweck, a professor of psychology at Stanford University in California. Over the past 20 years, Dweck has conducted dozens of studies about praise’s impact on students’ self-esteem and academic achievement. Here is a transcript of our conversation, which has been condensed and lightly edited.

Via John Evans
Lou Salza's insight:
Carol Dweck's work on growth mindset is key to so much of what is important in schools!Lou
 
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Unanimous SCOTUS Expands Scope of Special Education Rights @lawrenceschool @cdcowen 

Unanimous SCOTUS Expands Scope of Special Education Rights @lawrenceschool @cdcowen  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. wrote the opinion for the eight-member court, and he delivered much of it from the bench Wednesday morning.
 
"When all is said and done, a student offered an educational program providing 'merely more than de minimis' progress from year to year can hardly be said to have been offered an education at all," Roberts said.
 
"For children with disabilities, receiving instruction that aims so low would be tantamount to 'sitting idly ... awaiting the time when they were old enough to drop out,'" he added, quoting from key 1982 Supreme Court precedent on special education, Board of Education of the Hendrick Hudson Central School District v. Rowley, that also dealt with the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.
 
"The IDEA demands more," the chief justice said. "It requires an educational program reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress appropriate in light of the child's circumstances."
Lou Salza's insight:
I celebrate Chief Justice Roberts clear articulation of the responsibility we have to children in special education. -Lou
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Why the only future worth building includes everyone

Why the only future worth building includes everyone | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A single individual is enough for hope to exist, and that individual can be you, says His Holiness Pope Francis in this searing TED Talk delivered directly from Vatican City. In a hopeful message to people of all faiths, to those who have power as well as those who don't, the spiritual leader provides illuminating commentary on the world as we currently find it and calls for equality, solidarity and tenderness to prevail. "Let us help each other, all together, to remember that the 'other' is not a statistic, or a number," he says. "We all need each other."
Lou Salza's insight:
Well worth your time---
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When letter grades get an F @HawkenSchool @lawrenceschool @CRGLaurelSchool 

When letter grades get an F @HawkenSchool @lawrenceschool @CRGLaurelSchool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Hawken's head of school D. Scott Looney hates letter grades so much that he's building a national movement to get rid of them.

Looney, whose school boasts campuses in Lyndhurst and Gates Mills, has put together a coalition of more than 100 of the nation's most-powerful private schools pushing for a dramatic redesign of the standard college transcript that has been in use for well over a century. This, too, is much more than a meeting of the minds, but rather a well-financed, well-connected and deeply passionate group of educators who believe they have what it takes to unwind a century's worth of educational pedagogy.

Dramatic? Yes, but that's entirely the point.

"When I finally shuffle out of the educational business into retirement or death, I want to know I tried to fix the system because it's broken," Looney said. "It's hurting kids, and it's unhealthy."
Lou Salza's insight:
"The public purpose of private education is to be the vanguard — laboratory schools — for what really floats the boat. Across the country, independent schools have been innovators." Mr. Salza was recently quoted in this Crain's Cleveland Business article about the Mastery Transcript Consortium. Lawrence is proud to stand with Hawken School and Laurel School - and with more than 100 independent schools nationwide - at the forefront of this important conversation!
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Research Institute for Learning and Development Awarded $100,000 Grant from Cummings Foundation

Research Institute for Learning and Development Awarded $100,000 Grant from Cummings Foundation | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
LEXINGTON, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Research Institute for Learning and Development (ResearchILD) has been selected as one of 100 local nonprofits to receive a grant of $100,000 through the Cummings Foundation’s $100K for 100 program. ResearchILD, an internationally recognized educational research organization, develops educational programs for children, adults, and adolescents with learning and attention differences. ResearchILD was chosen from more than 370 applicants during a competitive review process by the Cummings Foundation. The grant will be used to support the SMARTS Executive Function and Mentoring Program as part of the “After the Bell” program at the James L. McKeown Boys & Girls Club of Woburn, MA.
Lou Salza's insight:
Congratulations to @ILD_Strategies 
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Dealing With Dyslexia, Starting With One Family's Battle For A Diagnosis

Dealing With Dyslexia, Starting With One Family's Battle For A Diagnosis | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Most schools in Massachusetts don't screen for dyslexia, even though experts say diagnosing the learning disability early is the key to successful interventions.

Instead, many districts wait until a child shows obvious signs of trouble reading or writing. Some advocates say by then, it's too late.

Lou Salza's insight:
While early identification and intervention is always best; it is never too late to initiate evaluation and appropriate programming to address reading challenges. --Lou
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Looking to Ditch Traditional Grades? Here’s How to Get Stakeholders On Board (EdSurge News)

Looking to Ditch Traditional Grades? Here’s How to Get Stakeholders On Board (EdSurge News) | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
You know that old interview question: What would change in education if you had a magic wand? For Scott Looney, there’d be no hesitating: He would have every school switch from traditional grading to competency-based evaluations. “’They’re more authentic, more meaningful, and more logical,” he explains. “They just make sense.”

Looney is the mastermind behind the Mastery Transcript Consortium (MTC), an organization made up of over 100 private schools. Rather than a traditional GPA, the group imagines a credit-based transcript , with links to artifacts that demonstrate students’ mastery across different competencies. The basic premise is that by providing a more complex and accurate picture of students, academic needs can be better met, colleges can make more informed admissions decisions, and intrinsic motivation will follow.
Lou Salza's insight:
The future is almost here! --Lou
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This 75-Year Harvard Study Found the 1 Secret to Leading a Fulfilling Life @lawrenceschool

This 75-Year Harvard Study Found the 1 Secret to Leading a Fulfilling Life @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For over 75 years, Harvard's Grant and Glueck study has tracked the physical and emotional well-being of two populations: 456 poor men growing up in Boston from 1939 to 2014 (the Grant Study), and 268 male graduates from Harvard's classes of 1939-1944 (the Glueck study).

Due to the length of the research period, this has required multiple generations of researchers. Since before WWII, they've diligently analyzed blood samples, conducted brain scans (once they became available), and pored over self-reported surveys, as well as actual interactions with these men, to compile the findings.

The conclusion? According to Robert Waldinger, director of the Harvard Study of Adult Development, one thing surpasses all the rest in terms of importance:

"The clearest message that we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period."

Not how much is in your 401(k). Not how many conferences you spoke at--or keynoted. Not how many blog posts you wrote or how many followers you had or how many tech companies you worked for or how much power you wielded there or how much you vested at each.

No, the biggest predictor of your happiness and fulfillment overall in life is, basically, love.
Lou Salza's insight:
 "The clearest message that we get from this 75-year study is this: Good relationships keep us happier and healthier. Period."
Is anyone surprised!?-Lou
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Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes @lawrenceschool 

Mapping the human impact on the Great Lakes @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"It’s no secret that the Great Lakes are suffering tremendous ecological strain — Lake Erie was even pronounced “dead” for a time during the 1960s because of an overload of phosphorus from municipal waste. Back in 1615, though, when the entire region was pristine and explorers Samuel de Champlain and Étienne Brûlé gazed out together from Lake Huron’s shores, they dubbed it la mer douce, 'the sweet sea.' Today roughly one-quarter of Canada’s population and a 10th of America’s population drink from the Great Lakes basin; the beleaguered lakes alone hold more than a fifth of Earth’s freshwater."


Via Seth Dixon
Lou Salza's insight:
These lakes are a tremendous resource, not only for the region but the nation as well. They need our attention and protection.-Lou 
 
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 25, 4:57 PM

Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  How does this similar map shed more light on these issues?  

 

TagsCanada, environment, resources, waterspatial, scale

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Do You Zone Out? Procrastinate? Might Be Adult ADHD @NPR @lawrenceschool 

Do You Zone Out? Procrastinate? Might Be Adult ADHD @NPR @lawrenceschool  | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Six simple questions can reliably identify adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, according to a World Health Organization advisory group working with two additional psychiatrists.

The questions are:

How often do you have difficulty concentrating on what people say to you, even when they are speaking to you directly?
How often do you leave your seat in meetings and other situations in which you are expected to remain seated?
How often do you have difficulty unwinding and relaxing when you have time to yourself?
When you're in a conversation, how often do you find yourself finishing the sentences of the people you are talking to before they can finish them themselves?
How often do you put things off until the last minute?
How often do you depend on others to keep your life in order and attend to details?
The response options are "never," "rarely," "sometimes," "often" or "very often."

"It's very important to look at the questions in their totality, not each individual symptom," says Dr. David Goodman, an assistant professor of psychiatry at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine who was not involved in the study. "No single question stands out as indicating ADHD."

Using data from the National Comorbidity Survey, the authors found that the six questions appear to reliably, and specifically, screen for ADHD in adults. That could allow primary care physicians who have limited time with each patient to quickly and easily determine whether to recommend patients for further psychiatric evaluation, or even to prescribe medication.
Lou Salza's insight:
Simple but apparently reliable screening device to identify the possibility of ADHD in adults. --Lou
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Kingswood Oxford School: Leadership Institute for Educators of Color @KOHeadofSchool @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool

Kingswood Oxford School: Leadership Institute for Educators of Color @KOHeadofSchool @NAISnetwork @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In June 2012, Head of School Dennis Bisgaard founded the Kingswood Oxford Leadership Institute for Educators of Color, meant to provide education, resources, and networking opportunities for people of color on the path toward becoming Senior Administrators or Heads of School at independent schools. 

The Leadership Institute was created in response to a stark reality in the independent school profession at the time: Out of 1,400 schools that belong to the National Association of Independent Schools (NAIS), only 4% -- 50 schools -- are led by a person of color. The percentage of female Heads, while not quite as low, is still surprisingly small, especially at the high school level.

The mission of the KO Leadership Institute is to help educators of color explore, prepare for, and position themselves for passageway into leadership roles within independent schools. Several national experts serve in advisory capacities and/or as presenters at the Institute. 
Lou Salza's insight:
In our schools reside potential leaders who need recognition, encouragement, professional development opportunities along with a network outside their own schools to see themselves in leadership roles--Thank you Dennis Bisgaard and K-O!--Lou
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Instagram post by Richard Branson • Mar 31, 2017 at 11:01am UTC Really? @lawrenceschool

Instagram post by Richard Branson • Mar 31, 2017 at 11:01am UTC Really? @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
11k Likes, 461 Comments - Richard Branson (@richardbranson) on Instagram: “I'm #madebydyslexia”
Lou Salza's insight:
I doubt that anyone is ever "made by dyslexia" as Richard Branson says here. The word dyslexia informs and describes but does not define us. But if you own a controlling interest in Great Britain; you can say whatever you want and people will listen!
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Reimagining the School Day - Center for American Progress @lawrenceschool

Reimagining the School Day - Center for American Progress @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"The squeeze for time to plan lessons and complete other administrative tasks shapes a school’s professional environment and, ultimately, affects the quality of instruction. In a recent survey from the American Federation of Teachers, one of teachers’ two most cited “everyday stressors” was time pressure.8 As teachers are largely separate from other educators during instruction, lack of time for collaboration can be very isolating. More than half of lower secondary school teachers in the United States report that they do not teach jointly or observe other teachers.9 Such practices can improve teaching quality by granting teachers opportunities to receive feedback on their lesson execution and infuse new best practices into their repertoire.
In addition, providing teachers with more time to plan and attend to other responsibilities throughout the school day creates systematic opportunities to support new teachers and stretch more seasoned teachers—increasing the likelihood of teacher retention. During this structured planning time, new teachers should receive the coaching and personalized training they need to maximize their effectiveness and meet their professional goals. Meanwhile, experienced teachers can pursue leadership roles or coach new teachers.
Fortunately, schools can look to several promising models to change their typical schedules. The Center for American Progress compiled five of these innovative school schedules. Some of these schedules have already been implemented in schools across the country to improve instruction and ensure that teachers have ample time to teach, prepare, and develop their craft. CAP has also included teachers’ ideas for alternatives to the traditional school day model.
While each example schedule varies, there were similarities in how school leaders and teachers at each school reimagined the use of time. These innovative schedules all included:
Additional time for planning and collaboration
Flexible instructional blocks to differentiate content to student need
Opportunities for small group instruction or student-directed learning"

Lou Salza's insight:
The industrial-era school day and the agricultural school year need to be repealed and replaced! Where have I heard this phrase? Perhaps if we re-thought, re-organized, and re-ordered our priorities we could better focus students' activities to promote collaborative learning, communication, literacy, numeracy, problem solving,&  team work skills. This would foster leadership, citizenship, character and maybe even the courage to change on the part of teachers and admins. First resist memorization, timed, high stakes testing, excessive homework and grading! The future of our society, economy and democracy are in play. --Lou
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While Gorsuch testified, SCOTUS unanimously contradicted his 2008 decision on LD kids and IDEA requirements

While Gorsuch testified, SCOTUS unanimously contradicted his 2008 decision on LD kids and IDEA requirements | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
About 40 minutes after Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch began his second day of testimony before the Senate Judiciary Committee, all eight of the justices he hopes to join said a major disability decision Gorsuch wrote in 2008 was wrong.
Both the Supreme Court’s decision and Gorsuch’s 2008 opinion involved the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), which requires that public school systems which take certain federal funds provide a “free appropriate public education” to certain students with disabilities.
Applying this law to individual students, the Supreme Court acknowledged in its Wednesday opinion in Endrew F. v. Douglas County School District, is not an exact science. “A focus on the particular child is at the core of the IDEA,” Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the unanimous Supreme Court. “The instruction offered must be ‘specially designed’ to meet a child’s ‘unique needs’ through an ‘[i]ndividualized education program.’”
But while this process can be difficult, it must provide meaningful educational benefits to disabled students — which brings us to Judge Gorsuch’s error in a 2008 opinion. In Thompson R2-J School District v. Luke P., a case brought by an autistic student whose parents sought reimbursement for tuition at a specialized school for children with autism, Gorsuch read IDEA extraordinarily narrowly.
Under Gorsuch’s opinion in Luke P., a school district complies with the law so long as they provide educational benefits that “must merely be ‘more than de minimis.’”
“De minimis” is a Latin phrase meaning “so minor as to merit disregard.” So Gorsuch essentially concluded that school districts comply with their obligation to disabled students so long as they provide those students with a little more than nothing.
All eight justices rejected Gorsuch’s approach. IDEA, Chief Justice Roberts wrote, “is markedly more demanding than the ‘merely more than de minimis’ test applied by the Tenth Circuit.” Indeed, Roberts added, Gorsuch’s approach would effectively strip many disabled students of their right to an education. Roberts went on:
When all is said and done, a student offered an educational program providing “merely more than de minimis” progress from year to year can hardly be said to have been offered an education at all. For children with disabilities, receiving instruction that aims so low would be tantamount to “sitting idly . . . awaiting the time when they were old enough to ‘drop out.’”
To the contrary, the unanimous Supreme Court concluded, in most cases a student’s progress should be measured according to whether they are able to keep up with their non-disabled peers.
In a classroom, “regular examinations are administered, grades are awarded, and yearly advancement to higher grade levels is permitted for those children who attain an adequate knowledge of the course material.” The ability to “progress through this system is what our society generally means by an “education.’ And access to an ‘education’ is what the IDEA promises,” the Court concluded.
Lou Salza's insight:
Fascinating confluence--at the same time as his confirmation hearings, SCOTUS "disses" his legal thinking in a unanimous decision.  When has this court decided anything unanimously?!-Lou
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