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HBO documentary: Rethinking dyslexia: a blessing in a very good disguise?

HBO documentary: Rethinking dyslexia: a blessing in a very good disguise? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 

Rethinking dyslexia
By Janice D'Arcy
A new film makes the case that dyslexia may cause difficulties in reading, but it doesn’t cause difficulties in broader learning. In some cases, it goes so far as to suggest, the condition may even be a blessing in a very good, childhood-long disguise.
(iStockphoto)

“I really felt like people understand that dyslexia is a struggle, but they don’t understand the strengths, and that it isn’t an academic death sentence,” said James Redford, director of “The Big Picture: Rethinking Dyslexia,” which debuts Monday on HBO.

Redford’s father is the famous Robert, but more importantly in this context, his son, Dylan, is dyslexic.

Redford intended “The Big Picture” to be the film he wished he had seen when Dylan was first diagnosed. “It’s hard to know what the future holds, there’s so much anxiety. ... Well, it turns out that in the end there is a way through it.”

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ADHD Is Different for Women: MARIA YAGODA Atlantic

ADHD Is Different for Women: MARIA YAGODA Atlantic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
In editorials and in waiting rooms, concerns of too-liberal diagnoses and over-medication dominate our discussions of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD. The New York Times recently reported, with great alarm, the findings of a new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention study: 11 percent of school-age children have received an ADHD diagnosis, a 16 percent increase since 2007. And rising diagnoses mean rising treatments—drugs like Adderall and Ritalin are more accessible than ever, whether prescribed by a physician or purchased in a library. The consequences of misuse and abuse of these drugs are dangerous, sometimes fatal.

Yet also harmful are the consequences of ADHD untreated, an all-too-common story for women like me, who not only develop symptoms later in life, but also have symptoms—disorganization and forgetfulness, for instance—that look different than those typically expressed in males. While the New York Times’ Op-Ed columnist Roger Cohen may claim that Adderall and other “smart” drugs “have become to college what steroids are to baseball,” these drugs have given me, a relatively unambitious young adult who does not need to cram for tests or club until 6 a.m., a more normal, settled life.
Lou Salza's insight:

Important article! The science of ADHD in the USA, often based on rich white, boys, is completely missing our sisters, and daughters. Instead of properly identifying ADHD, girls are often misdiagnosed with depression or anxiety. In my experience girls in school who struggle with executive skills, time management actually care that they can't keep up with expectations and get sad and anxious!

--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"—it is estimated that there are around 4 million who are not diagnosed, or half to three-quarters of all women with ADHD—and the misunderstandings that have ensued about the disorder as it manifests in females, to the early clinical studies of ADHD in the 1970s. “These studies were based on really hyperactive young white boys who were taken to clinics,” Littman says. “The diagnostic criteria were developed based on those studies. As a result, those criteria over-represent the symptoms you see in young boys, making it difficult for girls to be diagnosed unless they behave like hyperactive boys.”

 
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5 Confusing Signs of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities

5 Confusing Signs of Nonverbal Learning Disabilities | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Symptoms of nonverbal learning disabilities can seem contradictory (such as being very talkative but unable to hold a conversation). See five confusing signs.
Lou Salza's insight:

The new site developed by NCLD--formerly LD.ORG is remarkable. This is the beta version--I recommend it to parents and teachers alike. Topics are NVLD, Auditory Processing Disorder, ADHD and others. Clear, concise, accurate and extremely helpful slide shows with text to speech capability for those of us who have print challenges.

----Lou 


Excerpt:


"Some signs of nonverbal learning disabilities (NVLD) might leave you scratching your head. Someone with NVLD might be extremely talkative, but not socially engaged. That can seem like a contradiction! Explore more of these confusing NVLD symptoms."

Read more: http://www.understood.org/en/learning-attention-issues/child-learning-disabilities/nonverbal-learning-disabilities/5-confusing-signs-of-nonverbal-learning-disabilities#ixzz3GVlZeKUT ;
Follow us: @UnderstoodOrg on Twitter | Understood on Facebook

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Top 10 Reasons Why Universities Need Entrepreneurs-in-Residence On Campus

Top 10 Reasons Why Universities Need Entrepreneurs-in-Residence On Campus | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Entrepreneurs-in-residence are successful businesspeople – and sometimes prominent members of the nonprofit world – who dedicate a specific amount of time doing research or pursuing other academic pursuits, primarily on campus or at locales associated with an academic institution.

The entrepreneur-in-residence will often wear many hats at a university. These professionals may take on the role of in-class lecturer, mentor student startups on campus, serve as a coach to entrepreneurs, judge business plan competitions and serve on advisory boards. Some universities will have their entrepreneur-in-residence support community outreach initiatives by advising small business owners and working with local high school students on special projects.

These talented men and women bring real-world expertise and entrepreneurial practice to students and academia, enhancing the business theoretical framework taught on campuses across the world.

Simply put, entrepreneurs-in-residence help expand and validate the theoretical knowledge taught on campuses by illustrating it with practical tips and everyday business guidance by sharing their real-world stories.

Lou Salza's insight:

And how many of these successful entrepreneurs are dyslexic?--Lou

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Just two hours of extra physical activity each week improved school performance

Just two hours of extra physical activity each week improved school performance | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Just two hours of extra physical activity each week can improve school performance. This has been shown by a study of approximately 2,000 twelve-year-olds carried out by scientists at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.

Lou Salza's insight:

We know this. We knew this. now we know the data exists to prove this. My favorite lines from the article: "It's being discussed whether more physical education in school would take time from academic subjects, and in this way weaken school performance. Our study shows that exactly the opposite may be the case." says Thomas Lindén".... 

-Lou

 

Excerpt:

Comparing the achievement

The effect of the intervention was evaluated by comparing the achievement of national learning goals by the children four years before and five years after its implementation. The results were compared to control groups in three schools that did not receive extra physical activity.

The results are clear, according to the scientists: A larger proportion on students in the intervention school did achieve the national learning goals in all subjects examined – Swedish, English and mathematics compared to the control groups.

"You can express it that two hours of extra physical education each week doubled the odds that a pupil achieves the national learning goals. We did not see a corresponding improvement in the control schools, where the pupils did not receive extra physical activity – rather the contrary, a deterioration," says scientist and neurologist Thomas Linden at the Sahlgrenska Academy.

Carefully chosen schools

The participating schools had been carefully chosen, and the scientists point out that they are fully comparable with respect to the number of boys and girls, the fraction of pupils with foreign background, and the average level of income, unemployment and education of the parents.

"It's difficult in a study like this to have control of all factors that can influence school performance. But the results are so consistent and point clearly in one direction that we believe that we have a scientific base for our conclusion: extra physical activity seems to help children succeed in school."

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When Whites Just Don’t Get It, Part 3, NYT OP-ED @NickKristof

When Whites Just Don’t Get It, Part 3, NYT OP-ED @NickKristof | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

“We have a system that treats you better if you’re rich and guilty than if you’re poor and innocent,” --Bryan Stevenson

Lou Salza's insight:

The 1954 Brown v Board of Education in Topeka was 60 years ago and our schools are still bastions of segregation and inequality. What's up with that?  We can not change what we are willing to tolerate. --Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...THE greatest problem is not with flat-out white racists, but rather with the far larger number of Americans who believe intellectually in racial equality but are quietly oblivious to injustice around them. Too many whites unquestioningly accept a system that disproportionately punishes blacks and that gives public schools serving disadvantaged children many fewer resources than those serving affluent children. We are not racists, but we accept a system that acts in racist ways.

Some whites think that the fundamental problem is young black men who show no personal responsibility, screw up and then look for others to blame. Yes, that happens. But I also see a white-dominated society that shows no sense of responsibility for disadvantaged children born on a path that often propels them toward drugs, crime and joblessness; we fail those kids before they fail us, and then we, too, look for others to blame...."

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Do Education Reformers Know What "College Ready" Means? John Warner

Do Education Reformers Know What "College Ready" Means? John Warner | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

While the Common Core State Standards look good in theory, as long as they are yoked to standardized assessments, we will not have students that are truly college and career ready.
High stakes standardized tests conducted on computers, with essays graded by algorithm, actively work against the development of the traits that are necessary for college success.

Lou Salza's insight:

It is a simple idea really: the traits we know will help our students excel in the marketplace can not be measured on a standardized multiple guess ( pre-answered) tests. Curiosity, self-regulation, empathy, passion, skepticism, character an courage, don't fit into an A,B,C,D,F paradigm. --Lou

Excerpt:


"...To do well in college students have to be able to exercise agency and choice, and not multiple choice from A, B, C, D and E.
The most successful students in my class would look at a question on a standardized test, and instead of trying to figure out the right answer, they would ask why they’re being asked this question. They should be able to examine the assumptions behind the choice of question, to analyze the possible biases underneath it. They should be able to consider half a dozen alternate ways the question could be asked. They should be able to take a stab at writing a better question.
CCSS literature says they want to help students think critically, except that to adopt these standards and the testing that must accompany them is to enforce compliance, rather than encourage students to develop critical thinking.
This mania for assessment is crowding out much more important experiences when it comes to student development...."

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 7, 11:07 AM

John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead argued that far off goals were the adult view of School. Children need something concrete to sustain them. They need to be building something that they can sense today.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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5 Essential Skills Needed for Reading Comprehension | Dyslexia | Types of LD

5 Essential Skills Needed for Reading Comprehension | Dyslexia | Types of LD | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Beginning around third or fourth grade, your child is expected to be able to read a passage of text, understand it and answer questions about it. Here are the five skills needed for reading comprehension

Lou Salza's insight:

Clear, Accurate, Pithy.-Lou

 

Excerpt:


1. Making the Connection Between Letters and Sounds

Once your child grasps the connection between letters (or groups of letters) and the sounds they typically make (phonics), he’ll be able to “sound out” words.

 

2.  Decoding the Text

The process of sounding out words is also known as decoding. As decoding becomes faster and more automatic, your child can shift his focus from sounding out words individually to understanding the meaning of what he is reading.

 

3. Recognizing Words

The ability to read whole words by sight without sounding them out is called “word recognition.” This speeds up the rate at which your child can read and understand a passage of text. This can be a challenging step for kids with dyslexia. Average readers require four to 14 exposures to a word before it becomes a “sight word.” Students with dyslexia may need up to 40 exposures.

 

4.Reading Fluently

Once your child can recognize most words by sight and quickly sound out any unfamiliar words, he can be called a “fluent” reader. Fluent readers read smoothly at a good pace, and use good expression in their voice when reading aloud. Fluency is essential for good reading comprehension.

 

5. Understanding the Text

Fluent readers can remember what they’ve just read and relate the new material to what they already know. They can recall details if asked and summarize what they understood from the passage. 

Readers with dyslexia can struggle to decode individual words. They can also have a harder time remembering what they’ve read. This makes it tougher to complete the important process of understanding and applying their new knowledge to what they’ve already learned."

 

 

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julieta's curator insight, October 2, 12:28 PM

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Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, October 4, 8:37 PM

Yes especially to #1.  If your child FEELS the shape of the letters correctly meaning top/down, that feeling for the letter will translate into an internal visualization of the letter.  They then can put the sound to the letter (s) and start connecting  multi syllables together.  Many children sense the letters from the bottom of their fingers when holding a pencil.  If this is occurring it is important to make them turn their hand over so that it looks flat and the index finger is feeling the top/down sensation necessary for the correct feeling.    

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Lawrence School Blog: For Our New Parents, It’s a New School, Year and Outlook!

Lawrence School Blog: For Our New Parents, It’s a New School, Year and Outlook! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I love the start of a new school year.

Even after all these years, it never gets old, is always invigorating and always inspires me. No matter how many times I hear the comments and observations from parents who begin their journey with us at one of these back-to-school sessions, each one touches me deeply. Each one represents a child and family transformed.

Each one, every year.

Best wishes for the school year ahead!
Lou Salza's insight:

To kick off our new Lawrence School Blog, Head of School Lou Salza contributes a very personal reflection about the start of the new school year. No matter how many he has been apart of, each one still inspires and invigorates him. A Lawrence School parent recently told Lou, “My daughter came home and told me she felt smart.” Find out why below.

 
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Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections

Slow to mature, quick to distract: ADHD study finds slower development of neural connections | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A peek inside the brains of more than 750 children and teens reveals a key difference in brain architecture between those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and those without.
Lou Salza's insight:

And I thought it was just me!---Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

".....Kids and teens with ADHD, a new study finds, lag behind others of the same age in how quickly their brains form connections within, and between, key brain networks.

The result: less-mature connections between a brain network that controls internally-directed thought (such as daydreaming) and networks that allow a person to focus on externally-directed tasks. That lag in connection development may help explain why people with ADHD get easily distracted or struggle to stay focused.

What's more, the new findings, and the methods used to make them, may one day allow doctors to use brain scans to diagnose ADHD—and track how well someone responds to treatment. This kind of neuroimaging "biomarker" doesn't yet exist for ADHD, or any psychiatric condition for that matter.

The new findings come from a team in the University of Michigan Medical School's Department of Psychiatry. They used highly advanced computing techniques to analyze a large pool of detailed brain scans that were publicly shared for scientists to study. Their results are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences...."

 

Lead author Chandra Sripada, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues looked at the brain scans of 275 kids and teens with ADHD, and 481others without it, using "connectomic" methods that can map interconnectivity between networks in the brain.

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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, September 17, 7:50 AM

This further validates Dr. Russell Barkley's 3 year/30% claim regarding developmental lag in social/emotional problem solving and difficulty with goal attainment...Executive Functions...

julieta's curator insight, October 2, 12:29 PM

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 14, 12:42 PM

This is an interesting article that casts ADHD/ADD into a different light.

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

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» The Secret Lives of Women with ADHD - World of Psychology

» The Secret Lives of Women with ADHD - World of Psychology | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Many women with ADHD live with a painful secret: “Shame, unfortunately, seems to be the name of the game, for many women I have worked with who have ADHD,” said Terry Matlen, MSW, ACSW, a psychotherapist and ADHD coach.

Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt:

"...Even women with advanced degrees in demanding, high-powered positions feel incredibly overwhelmed once they get home, stressed out by all the household details, she said. “They feel like they are living a lie — that their accomplishments are simply due to good luck.”

Even for women who understand how ADHD makes daily life difficult, one minor mistake or overlooked task can send them reeling from humiliation — “like simply forgetting to sign their child’s school-related paper in time.”...."

  
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Lawmakers spotlight aid available for students with dyslexia Kudos to: @DD_DE14 http://www.decodingdyslexiade.org/

Lawmakers spotlight aid available for students with dyslexia Kudos to:  @DD_DE14  http://www.decodingdyslexiade.org/ | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Lt. Gov. Matt Denn joined lawmakers at the Bear Library Monday to highlight a new law aimed at helping Delaware students with dyslexia and other decoding disabilities.


Lou Salza's insight:

 

 

Excerpt:

 

"....The new rules implemented this school year provide greater access to evidence-based reading interventions for students who have not begun to read by the age of seven. Every Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for disabled students who have not begun to read must list specific interventions being provided to improve their reading skills.

Denn says the new law will help to better involve parents in the planning of their child’s education.

“What we really want is parents of kids who are seven or older who have IEP’s to bring this up at their IEP meetings,” Denn said. “We want them to bring it up at their school ‘I understand my child is entitled to an evidence-based reading curriculum, what are we doing about that?’”

Individualized Education Plans for students with trouble reading must also provide for extra reading help over the summer as part of the new law.

State Senator Nicole Poore (D-Delaware City), who co-sponsored the bill in the General Assembly, says the provision is an important step in providing a continuous education for some students who otherwise would not have retained information over the summer.

 

- See more at: http://www.wdde.org/67550-lawmakers-put-spotlight-aid-students-dyslexia-disabilities?__scoop_post=303d6ed1-3da8-11e4-8b0f-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=311171#__scoop_post=303d6ed1-3da8-11e4-8b0f-90b11c3998fc&__scoop_topic=311171

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Lisa Frankel's curator insight, September 17, 4:16 PM

Decoding Dyslexia-DE would like to thank Lt. Gov. Matt Denn, Senator Poore and Representative Longhurst for their support of this valuable legislation.  Things are moving forward in Delaware!

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Community Education Series www.lawrenceschool.org/communityed | Lawrence School

Community Education Series www.lawrenceschool.org/communityed | Lawrence School | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

You are invited to join us for our 2014/15 Community Education Series at Lawrence School. Each event is free and open to the greater community. Please see below for event details, and register online early as attendance is limited for each event.

All events take place at the Garfield Theatre in Lawrence Upper School:
10036 Olde Eight Rd.
Sagamore Hills, OH 44067
If you have questions or would like more information, please contact Dee Dee Miller via email or at 440-832-7819. You may also download the event flyer.
Lou Salza's insight:
Our parent education series will be a great opportunity listen, ask, learn and connect with others!--Lou Supporting vs. Enabling: Parenting the Child with Executive Function DeficitsTuesday, September 23, 2014
Guest Speaker: Dr. Cheryl Chase
Register Online
read moreUnderstanding Dyslexia: Facts, Myths and TrendsWednesday, October 22, 2014
Register Online
read moreThe World of Assistive Technology: Tools for LifeThursday, November 20, 2014
Register Online
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How Dyslexia Affects the Curriculum | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan

How Dyslexia Affects the Curriculum | DyslexiaHelp at the University of Michigan | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Virtually every subject requires some reading and/or writing. Therefore, it is not a surprise that dyslexia can affect learning in all subject areas. Underlying deficits in accessing written text, reading fluency, spelling, written expression, organizing, following written directions, sequencing, using working memory (needed for problem solving), and visual processing (especially critical for worksheets, textbooks, and tests) can affect learning in different subjects in different ways.

As a consequence of their reading difficulties, students with dyslexia are forced to compensate for their weaknesses by following their peers, verbally processing information, relying on rote memorization, and using hands-on/experiential learning contexts.

Lou Salza's insight:

When I read an article like this I wonder why we won't simply change the way we assess and evaluate all our students--instead of trying to accommodate dyslexics. Grading hurts all kids--including the A students!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

"...Specific pitfalls related to each subject area are summarized below. (Note: Your student may not exhibit all of these difficulties.) A student with dyslexia may have difficulty in:

Science – using a systematic step-by-step approach to the experimental method; decoding and learning novel vocabulary (particularly multisyllabic words); navigating a textbook; identifying key points or what is most important; reading fluency; or writing and spelling for homework, projects, and tests. Difficulty with word retrieval and spelling may confound students on recall tests.Math – learning math terminology, symbols, and directionality when solving a problem; breaking apart multi-step written directions; conceptualizing abstract concepts; estimating; evaluating answers; or using a systematic step-by-step approach.History/Social Studies – transposing dates or maps; decoding and learning novel vocabulary (particularly multisyllabic words); navigating a textbook; identifying key points or what is most important; reading fluently; or writing and spelling for homework, projects, and tests. Difficulty with word retrieval and spelling may confound students on recall tests.Band/Choir – reading music or following multistep directions.Gym – following oral directions; following written directions and diagrams; learning specific vocabulary if they do not have prior learning or experience with it; using directionality; or remembering directions.Art – following step-by-step, sequential directions to complete a project; following diagrams; following oral directions; or keeping organized.Foreign Languages – spelling; learning vocabulary; knowing where to divide or segment words that are presented auditorily; implicitly learning grammatical rules; or fluently reading.


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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, September 13, 11:19 AM

There are excellent ideas included which require close 1-to-1 teaching with students. I found that adaptive technologies did not always work for students in the early stages. Teaching was important and being there with the student.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, September 14, 6:15 PM

RPS shares these symptoms. Reversed Positioning Sensation,  caused by the sensing the back side of the letters being written.    Academic achievement in general needs a combination of neurological senses for proper learning. Sensing the feel of the shape in ones' mind of letters (MOTOR) aids in the mental visualization of their appearance. Then the sound value can be applied and remembered. So this, is why learning handwriting is so important, and why so many dyslexics suffer.

These students can be helped by having them change their writing position ( not easy as this is the natural position they are comfortable with).  By turning the hand over, and keeping it in the new position,    so it feels the top/ down movement for making letters will make a world of difference.   Once the education community can understand this, and applies it ,  it will become a new world for these RPS effected individuals.  

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What’s the Difference Between Dysgraphia and Dyslexia?

What’s the Difference Between Dysgraphia and Dyslexia? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
It’s not unusual for kids to have both dyslexia and dysgraphia. Dyslexia is primarily associated with trouble reading. But it can also affect writing, spelling and even speaking. Dysgraphia mostly shows up as writing difficulties. Kids with dysgraphia may struggle with handwriting, organizing their thoughts on paper or with both of these activities.

Dyslexia and dysgraphia are brain-based issues. Both tend to emerge during childhood, although some people may not be diagnosed until later in life. Psychologists can get insights into how your child thinks and figure out the specific brain processes that are giving her difficulty. This will make it easier to find strategies that can help her with these lifelong challenges.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thoughtful, accurate, concise. I would add that there are remarkably accurate, easy to use and mobile technologies that can provide an enormous assisst with reading and writing tasks. --Lou

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Philip Powel Smith's curator insight, October 20, 10:53 AM

Understanding terminology is important. We far too often toss terms about as though everyone understands them. I hope this article helps clarify the difference between Dyslexia and Dysgraphia.

Rowe Young- Kaple's curator insight, October 20, 2:14 PM

The confusion exists because identified individuals have issues with related phoneme/grapheme difficulties.  While the motor issue is definitely a reversal issue and that is the basis of the description of dyslexia,  it has  gone unrecognized for what it really is.  Understanding RPS reversed positioning sensation is a step in the right direction.  Since this provides a new way to remediate many of the difficulties dyslexics face, it is urged for all those working with LD students to become aware of the findings.

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Channing Tatum Opens Up About Learning Disabilities In T Magazine

Channing Tatum Opens Up About Learning Disabilities In T Magazine | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Channing Tatum is on the cover of the latest issue of T, the New York Times Style Magazine, which is a pretty great thing. Better still is the accompanying article, where the 34-year-old actor candidly opens up about his struggles while growing up in the Southern U.S. school system. Some excerpts...

"I have never considered myself a very smart person, for a lot of reasons," Channing reveals, referring to his early difficulties with ADHD and dyslexia. "And so I’ve learned more from people than I have from school or from books."

School was a particular challenge for the award-winning actor -- and not just because of sub-par grades. "You get lumped in classes with kids with autism and Down Syndrome," Channing explains about being placed in special classes, "and you look around and say, 'Okay, so this is where I’m at."'

He adds, "Or you get put in the typical classes and you say, 'All right, I’m obviously not like these kids either.' So you’re kind of nowhere. You’re just different. The system is broken. If we can streamline a multibillion-dollar company, we should be able to help kids who struggle the way I did."
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you Channing!--Lou

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Scarier Than Ebola: Did you get your flu shot?

Scarier Than Ebola: Did you get your flu shot? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
We Americans do panic really well.

We could use a few pointers on prudence.

Do me a favor. Turn away from the ceaseless media coverage of Ebola in Texas — the interviews with the Dallas nurse’s neighbors, the hand-wringing over her pooch, the instructions on protective medical gear — and answer this: Have you had your flu shot? Are you planning on one?

During the 2013-2014 flu season, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, only 46 percent of Americans received vaccinations against influenza, even though it kills about 3,000 people in this country in a good year, nearly 50,000 in a bad one.

These are deaths by a familiar assassin. Many of them could have been prevented. So why aren’t we in a lather over that? Why fixate on remote threats that we feel we can’t control when there are immediate ones that we simply don’t bother to?
Lou Salza's insight:

We in the USA have a sketchy relationship with data and how we use it. And our questionable use of data is not limited to the education sector!--Lou

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Why Policy Change (ADA Restoration Act) Is So Important * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity

Why Policy Change (ADA Restoration Act) Is So Important * The Yale Center for Dyslexia & Creativity | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
world-renowned heart surgeon and Cleveland Clinic CEO Toby Cosgrove (pictured at left), who is also dyslexic, speaks passionately of his struggles with reading and spelling as a young student. He persevered, worked incredibly hard and succeeded in college. Yet, reflecting his physiologic inability to read quickly, he did not score well on his Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and was rejected from 12 of 13 medical schools to which he applied. And had not one medical school overlooked his low MCAT test scores, tens of thousands of patients would not have benefited from the remarkable advancements in cardiac surgery and minimally invasive valve repair, including at least 18 patents, that he has contributed to the world. 

Men and women who are dyslexic have contributed greatly to the cultural, scientific, and judicial life of this country and, in fact, the world. No doubt, there are more students who could be potential Toby Cosgroves or Richard Meiers or Chuck Closes or Stephen Speilbergs or John Irvings, enriching and changing the world; and yet, they will not be allowed to do so. It is not only people in these high-profile professions that are affected by high-stakes exams. Those who want to be master plumbers, nurses, asceticians, teachers, pharmacists, or police officers are also affected, as they, too, have to take and pass a high-stakes examination.

If dyslexics are not permitted extended time on these examinations, the world will be denied the contributions of their talents and they will lose their dreams—all because they cannot read fast enough to pass the inevitable gate-keeper of our society–high-stakes standardized tests. Each of these individuals thinks quickly and creatively, and it is only the printed word that they read slowly.
Lou Salza's insight:

Thank you to Dr.s Saywitz--and the Yale Center! Enough said! Let's get this done!--Lou

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High School Completion Program Awareness and Alternatives by Dara Warn

High School Completion Program Awareness and Alternatives by Dara Warn | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Creating higher education and career opportunities for disadvantaged students starts with high school completion — and today's non-traditional high school learner has options. The goal of many academic organizations is to find solutions to help increase high school graduation rates and provide at-risk students with career-focused options.

Many people hear of the GED test or General Education Development test, but this is not the only option. High School Completion programs are varied. Earning a high school diploma through hybrid and online learning, taking an HSE assessment to earn a credential and supplementing traditional curriculums with a college and career-specific program can advance and complete a high school education. Here is a lay of the land:
Lou Salza's insight:

Alternatives we can promote to our kids who are pushout of school, or for other reasons need a way to get back in the educational game.--Lou

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Working for a Literate Nation | LD Insights Blog | Blogs @LynPollard @LiterateNation

Working for a Literate Nation | LD Insights Blog  | Blogs @LynPollard @LiterateNation | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Parent Advocacy Boot Camps

How will parent advocates be trained? Literate Nation will be holding Literacy Boot Camps this Fall. The Boot Camps will provide resources and tools for people who want to work together toward changing the education system across America. Parents make up an important part of this group.

Join Me at Camp and Get Trained

As Parent Advocacy Manager with NCLD and also a Literate Nation partner, I’m excited to be part of this training process. I focus a lot of my time and energy on connecting parents to resources. I help parents find support as they navigate the advocacy journey for their children with learning and attention issues. Indeed, I’ve learned a lot on own journey as a parent advocate for my two children with learning and attention issues. Along the way, I’ve developed some tips and best practices that can help parents become more knowledgeable, collaborative and powerful advocates.

Lou Salza's insight:


"......Join me @LynPollard  at the Literate Nation Boot Camp in Williamsburg, Virginia on September 26-28 and join in virtually or in person in Denver, Colorado on October 17-19. I’ll be presenting at both Boot Camps. I’ll share how parents can make their advocacy most effective. Come and learn how to engage with the right people in the right places as you plan your legislative agenda. Get insight into the best ways to use social media to communicate with key decision makers and broadcast key messages.

We’re all working together toward a nation where every child has the opportunity to learn to read in an appropriate learning environment. I’m excited to help parents become a key part of the solution...."

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New smartphone app gives sight to the blind & boon to those with print challenges!

New smartphone app gives sight to the blind &  boon to those with print challenges! | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The new app that allows blind people to listen to an audio readback of printed text is receiving rave reviews after its first day of availability and is being heralded as a life-changer by many people.
Blind people say the KNFB Reader app will enable a new level of engagement in everyday life, from reading menus in restaurants to browsing handouts in the classroom.

Lou Salza's insight:

It was only a matter of time that universal optical character recognition got folded into a smartphone app! The article details the history of OCR from the early days of the first "washing machine sized" device that cost $50,000 to the great news about the KNFB App. It is nimble, pricey & accurate;  --it will only get better and cheaper!--Lou

 

Excerpt:


"The $99 app is the result of a four decades-long relationship between the National Federation of the Blind and Ray Kurzweil, a well-known artificial-intelligence scientist and senior Google employee. According to its website, K-NFB Reading Technology Inc and Sensotec NV, a Belgium-based company, led the technical development of the app.
Kurzweil, who demonstrated the app on stage at the NFB’s annual convention in June, said it can replace a “sighted adviser”.
Taking advantage of new pattern recognition and image- processing technology as well as new smartphone hardware, the app allows users to adjust or tilt the camera, and reads printed materials out loud. People with refreshable Braille displays can now snap pictures of print documents and display them in Braille near-instantaneously, said NFB spokesman Chris Danielsen."

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julieta's curator insight, October 2, 12:28 PM

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Accredited Private School | Learning Differences | High Point, NC

Accredited Private School | Learning Differences | High Point, NC | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Noble Academy is a very caring, nurturing, and accepting environment for young people
to receive a quality education. Not only are academic needs met, but students who have suffered from low self-esteem and low self-confidence in the past find that Noble Academy provides a place where they can grow in these areas as well. When a student arrives at Noble Academy, they are greeted by a dedicated and committed faculty and staff who knows each student’s name and individual needs. Our direct instruction approach, attention to individual needs, and a strong emphasis on the enhancement of self-esteem allow students to build the confidence they need to maximize their potential.
Lou Salza's insight:

Check out this cool video that describes the differences the right school for a child can make: at this school, the difference is learning!--Lou

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Michigan State Univ: "Kids With ADHD need Exercise Before School" Question: -Don't we all!?

Michigan State Univ: "Kids With ADHD need Exercise Before School" Question:  -Don't we all!? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
A new study shows that offering daily before-school, aerobic activities to younger at-risk children could help reduce the symptoms of ADHD in the classroom and at home.
Lou Salza's insight:

Exercise is good for all kids--at any age and it is shameful that so many schools have sacrificed recess minutes and activity periods in  order to increase instructional time.

Our children should chase  playground ball not state assessment test scores! --Lou

 

Excerpt:

"....Over a 12-week period, Smith and Hoza studied about 200 early elementary school students ranging from kindergarten to second grade that either exhibited signs of ADHD or didn’t.

During the trial, students were randomly selected to participate in a group that completed moderate to vigorous physical activity each day before school, or a group that completed more sedentary classroom-type activities.

“Although our findings indicated that all participants showed improvements, children with ADHD risk receiving exercise benefited across a broader range of outcomes than those receiving the sedentary activities,” Smith says.

Smith indicates that further studies are needed to better understand the frequency and amount of physical activity that can provide benefits to children and adds that the effects of exercise may be different based on a child’s age.

“Despite the number of remaining questions, physical activity appears to be a promising intervention method for ADHD with well-known benefits to health overall,” he says.

“This gives schools one more good reason to incorporate physical activity into the school day.”..."

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julieta's curator insight, October 2, 12:29 PM

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Reduce Math Anxiety! four easy math tips 'add up' for kids with attention deficit

Reduce Math Anxiety! four easy math tips 'add up' for kids with attention deficit | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

These four easy math tips really add up for kids with attention deficit.

 1. Concept Over Memorization We learned with our daughters, who have dyscalculia, that memorization of math facts wasn’t going to happen. While they got some facts down pat, others never stuck. By teaching the principle or concept over memorization, we gave them the tools to solve larger math problems. 

Lou Salza's insight:

Common sense!--Lou


For example, my child may not know 8 x 9 off the top of her head, but she knows that 8 x 9 is the same as adding eight together nine times. She knows that she can add four more eights to 8 x 5, which she knows is 40, to come up with the answer. When a child struggles with math,understanding the concepts behind what she’s doing creates a foundation to build on.

2. Turn Off the Timer Pressure has never been a friend to the ADHD brain. Timed math fact tests are intimidating, causing more problems than they solve. My ADHDers complain all the time about how their brains freeze the minute the timer starts, making it impossible to think and be successful. Since memorization is the goal, turning off the timer and letting a child work at her own pace can make math facts more approachable. How to handle timed math fact tests is a great item for discussion and action in an IEP or 504 Plan.

3. Use Scratch Paper Wisely Turning lined paper sideways is a great way to make columns, which helps can make keeping larger math problems easier to work without getting lost in a sea of numbers. It especially helps students with dyslexia and dyscalculia, who often accidentally swap numbers a lot. We taught our kids from an early age to turn their lined paper sideways and to use the lines as columns. Laying out problems one number per column helps them solve math problems with more accuracy. Another option is to have your children create their own columns on blank paper before they start to work a problem.

4. Get Creative Every mind is different, so be creative in helping your child learn math. Triangle-shaped flash cards, while confusing to most of our kids, were a godsend to one of our daughters, who understood the concept of division better than she did multiplication. We used that strength to conquer her weaknesses. Colored markers, salt trays (where our tactile daughter could draw and work math problems in a tray of salt), making pictures out of numbers and math problems — don’t be afraid to think outside the box when conventional means fail.

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The Miracle that is Reading http://bodineschool.org/ - YouTube

Reading... While accepted as one of the most critical skills required to succeed, it has been terribly misunderstood for much too long..

Lou Salza's insight:

In 3 and a half minutes the folks at the http://bodineschool.org/ have summarized the complexity of learning how to read.--Lou

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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, September 17, 8:04 AM

EXACTLY!  Rocket Science....

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Spotlight on Dyslexia @Learning_Ally Keynote Speaker Dana Buchman, founder of Promise Project

Spotlight on Dyslexia @Learning_Ally  Keynote Speaker Dana Buchman, founder of Promise Project | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Acclaimed designer Dana Buchman, the keynoter for our upcoming Virtual Parent Conference, Spotlight on Dyslexia, is more than a fashion icon. Her experience as the mother of a daughter with learning differences fuels her passion for helping New York's inner city children gain access to reading.
Lou Salza's insight:

Excerpt:

"......It’s not just a hobby for Buchman. She lives it. Nearly two decades ago, her eldest daughter, Charlotte, was diagnosed with learning disabilities.

Like any parent, Buchman wanted to know how to best help her child. What her doctor told her was a shock. Charlotte would best be served by attending a special private school – a school that serves the needs of children who learn differently...."

 

Spotlight on Dyslexia; A Virtual Parent Conference

Learning Ally is excited to announce Dana Buchman as our keynote speaker for our upcoming Virtual Parent Conference, Spotlight on Dyslexia. She’ll be joining 21 speakers who will delve into a wide range of topics — everything from IEPs to the emotional impacts of dyslexia. Save the date forDecember 5th, and learn more by visitingwww.LearningAlly.org/DyslexiaConference ;

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