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2 minute video featuring Richard Branson and Charles Schwab: The Big Picture Movie "You May Be Dyslexic"

"You May Be Dyslexic If..." © Dr. Sally Shaywitz, MD For more information, please visit us at www.thebigpicturemovie.com or dyslexia.yale.edu/. (RT @BigPictureMovie: Ever wonder if you have #dyslexia?
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Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools
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Poor students don’t just need teachers. They need social workers.To Keep Poor Students in School, Provide Social Services By Daniel J. Cardiniali, NYT Op-Ed

Poor students don’t just need teachers. They need social workers.To Keep Poor Students in School, Provide Social Services By Daniel J. Cardiniali, NYT Op-Ed | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Dan Cardinali has led Communities In Schools since 2004. Under his leadership, the organization has developed and embraced an evidence-based model of integrated student service provision and has launched a national growth strategy to increase the organization’s impact on improving public education. Cardinali’s background as a community organizer has helped the organization continue its steady and measured growth, establish its voice in national education policy debates, and launch an organization-wide quality improvement campaign.

Lou Salza's insight:

Thoughtful OP-ED in the NYT this week from Dan Cardinali, Pres., of Communities in Schools.--Lou

 

My favorite lines from Dan's piece:

 

"...The key is to put dedicated social-service specialists in every low-performing, high-poverty school, whether they are employed by the school district or another organization. This specialist must be trained in the delivery of community services, with continued funding contingent on improvement in indicators like attendance and dropout rates.

Putting social workers in schools is a low-cost way of avoiding bigger problems down the road, analogous to having a social worker in a hospital emergency room. It’s a common-sense solution that will still require a measure of political courage, something that all too often has itself been chronically absent.''

 

By Dan Cardiniali

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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies by Ingfei Chen @bencareynyt

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies by Ingfei Chen @bencareynyt | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

 his new book, “How We Learn: The Surprising Truth about When, Where, and Why It Happens,” author Benedict Carey informs us that “most of our instincts about learning are misplaced, incomplete, or flat wrong” and “rooted more in superstition than in science.”The traditional advice on learning has been to “study hard,” in a quiet place and with the same routine, yet that doesn’t say much about what to specifically do. But pupils today can change the way they study to exploit the brain’s quirky learning processes, using the strategies revealed by memory and learning research. While that science is still maturing, “it’s at a place now where it can give you a specific tactical plan,” Carey said. Students can tailor their preparation with techniques targeting different kinds of content or skills, and manage their schedule to optimize their time. “That’s a powerful thing, because we go through our whole lives never knowing that,” he said."

 

Lou Salza's insight:

Schools and schooling have changed too little over the years compared to the way kids actually learn and the way the marketplace now operates. What Carey’s Book offers is encouragement to young people to find their way—(not ours!) and acquire the tools that will help them succeed in the new digital world in which they are immersed ( not the world that most teachers and school administrators succeeded in!).

And let’s be clear: this is not about getting higher GPAs and scoring higher on the SAT or the ACT.  It is about  learning and achieving using tools that didn’t exist ten years ago in order to succeed at jobs that won’t exist for another ten years. ---Lou  

 

Excerpts: 

For example:

– Breaking up and spacing out study time over days or weeks can substantially boost how much of the material students retain, and for longer, compared to lumping everything into a single, nose-to-the-grindstone session.

– Varying the studying environment — by hitting the books in, say, a cafe or garden rather than only hunkering down in the library, or even by listening to different background music — can help reinforce and sharpen the memory of what you learn.

– A 15-minute break to go for a walk or trawl on social media isn’t necessarily wasteful procrastination. Distractions and interruptions can allow for mental “incubation” and flashes of insight — but only if you’ve been working at a problem for a while and get stuck, according to a 2009 research meta-analysis.

– Quizzing oneself on new material, such as by reciting it aloud from memory or trying to tell a friend about it, is a far more powerful way to master information than just re-reading it, according to work by researchers including Henry Roediger III and Jeffrey Karpicke. (Roediger has co-authored his own book, “Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning.”)

 

Ultimately, the value of these learning strategies isn’t just about earning better grades, Carey said. In the modern jungle of society, learning is still about surviving: For young people, it’s about sussing out what they’re good at, what rings their bell, and what they want to do with their lives. “It’s informing you of: Who am I? Where do I place my bets? Do I major in physics or do I major in architecture or design, or do I major in English? Do I belong here at all?” Carey said. Those are important decisions. “Being self-aware about what’s effective learning and how it happens, I think, gives you a real edge in making those choices.”

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Technology maybe 'agnostic' but the presence of digital devices has made some huge cracks in traditional curriculum walls--The iPad as a 'Trojan Mouse'

Technology maybe 'agnostic' but the presence of digital devices has made some huge cracks in traditional curriculum walls--The iPad as a 'Trojan Mouse' | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

"In the best circumstances, the iPad is a Trojan Mouse. The outside is shiny and attractive, all the better to lure our unwary colleagues into opening the gates to their black box. Those of us interested in meaningful change in teaching and learning need to make sure that the shiny exterior of the Trojan Mouse is stuffed inside with serious questions about practice, student relationships, assessment, a shared language about pedagogy, and a shared vision for our students."

Lou Salza's insight:

I love this metaphor--technology in the hands of teachers and students--unsequestered by tech lab walls--in the classrooms and learning centers  has thrown open formerly closed gates of the curriculum and crossed the moat that was once used to control which textbooks, and which information got included in students' learning

-Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

Technology doesn't magically change teacher's practice. You can have students use iPads in much the same way that they once used slate boards. But what new technologies like tablets or laptops can do is open new avenues for conversation. In schools where every child has a portable, multimedia creation device, what can we do differently? What is possible now that wasn't possible before?

Cuban argues pursuasively that the most powerful practice for meaningful reform in schools is teacher professional development in learning communities:

"What promises to increase the worth of districtwide professional development, especially if based within schools and involving teachers in the planning, are those efforts concentrating on prevailing beliefs among teachers about teaching and learning, current norms in the school community, and classroom practices. When teachers work together to examine student work and analyze classroom lessons, they figure out collectively what works and what doesn't, and they build a culture of learning across grade levels in elementary school s and within departments in secondary school. They build and share pedagogical capital—a scarce resource because isolation is endemic to age-graded schools"

 

 
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How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - By Katie Lepi, Edudemic

How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) -  By Katie Lepi, Edudemic | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

When we talk about how our education system is failing our students, there are a lot of different options presented on how to ‘fix’ it. Everyone has an answer, a promising new way of thinking, a potential magic bullet. Inevitably, we also examine school systems that are working as a part of investigating what to do or not to do with our own.…

Lou Salza's insight:

The research in the US is murky at best, but commonsense and the data suggest we put too much emphasis on compliance with excessive homework requirements. Grading practice problem sets in math for example troubles me because practice should not be evaluated except as it proves an effective path towards mastery. Likewise, giving students failing grades for failing to hand in homework when they have mastered subject matter is irrational. --Lou

 

Excerpt:" ....And one of those that is working and is almost always mentioned is Finland. Their students regularly top the charts on global education metrics despite a lack of homework and more away-from-the-desk time during the school day. No homework is a pretty drastic measure in most people’s minds, so how does it work?

The handy infographic below takes a look at why homework doesn’t seem to be a necessity given the structure of the rest of the system. Do you think a Finland-esque education system would work here in the US? Why or why not? Weigh in by leaving a comment below, mentioning @Edudemic on Twitter or leaving your thoughts on our Facebook page.

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Cisco CEO John Chambers: My Dyslexia Is A Weakness AND A Strength

Cisco CEO John Chambers: My Dyslexia Is A Weakness AND A Strength | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Chambers has dyslexia and he's a role model and spokesperson for the learning disability. But he still finds it painful to talk about it.
Lou Salza's insight:

I so appreciate the balanced perspective taken in this article. --Lou


Excerpt:

"By anyone's standards (even his own), Cisco CEO John Chambers has a great and enviable life.

 

He's fabulously wealthy (paid $21 million last year alone), flies around in his own private jet meeting with presidents and kings bringing tech to rich nations and impoverished countries alike.

But sometimes, he remembers being a young child whose teachers thought he wasn't smart and wouldn't go to college.

Chambers has dyslexia, a learning disability, and, years ago, he accidentally became a public spokesperson for it...."



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/cisco-ceo-john-chambers-talks-dyslexia-2014-7#ixzz38mSq2zLE

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Dyslexia's Emotional Impact by Sandie Barrie Blackley @DDVA13

Dyslexia's Emotional Impact by Sandie Barrie Blackley @DDVA13 | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
For dyslexic children, what begins as an educational problem can quickly descend into an emotional problem.
Lou Salza's insight:

According to Thomas Mann: "Everything is politics".

According to the former Speaker of the U.S. House, Tip O'Neill: "all politics is local".  Thank you to the folks at Decoding Dyslexia all over the USA for their remarkably strong, successful efforts at advancing advocacy for dyslexics in State governments!--Lou 

 

Excerpt:

".....School reading or writing assignments may serve as triggers for intensely negative emotions of fear, stress, and anxiety, which in turn lead to memory and attention disruptions, which lead to physiological manifestations of that unease—and in some cases, catastrophic thoughts. By considering these cascading effects, we can understand why depression and, sadly, suicide rates for dyslexic children are higher than for the general population.

 

This sort of cycle is well-known in psychology, with the “anxiety cascade” being taught over many decades, even in basic psychology courses. The diagram included in this article adapts that cycle to specifically address the pattern observed in dyslexic children.

Because of this “Vortex of Dyslexia,” early intervention for children is critical. Dyslexia is in many ways an invisible struggle. If dyslexic children are not properly evaluated and treated what may seem to outsiders as “simple” reading and writing difficulties can grow into far more significant psychological or physiological problems..."

 
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Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans

Interactive Time-Lapse Map Shows How the U.S. Took More Than 1.5 Billion Acres From Native Americans | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations.  (Above is a GIF of the map's time-lapse display; visit the map's page to play with its features.) 

Lou Salza's insight:

Powerful teaching tool!-Lou

Excerpt:

"...While the time-lapse function is the most visually impressive aspect of this interactive, the “source map” option (available on the map's site) offers a deep level of detail. By selecting a source map, and then zooming in to the state you’ve selected, you can see details of the map used to generate that section of the interactive. A pop-up box tells you which Native nation was resident on the land, and the date of the treaty or executive order that transferred the area to the government, as well as offering external links to descriptions of the treaty and of the tract of land..."

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School Video Lawrence School, Sagamore Hills and Broadview Hgts, OH @lsalza

School Video Lawrence School, Sagamore Hills and Broadview Hgts, OH @lsalza | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Lawrence School: Where Differences are not Disabilities and where Great Minds Don't Think Alike"

Lou Salza's insight:

We are proud of our students, parents, and teachers at Lawrence School : 7 minute video!-Lou 

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, June 25, 7:15 PM

This short video is a good demonstration of the confusing world students with LD are faced with that creates a negative self-image, and how proper attention to their individual learning needs can change their self-image dramatically. -Lon

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Report Identifies 'Intuitive' Technology, Hybrid Learning as Emerging Ed-Tech Trends By Danielle Wilson

Report Identifies 'Intuitive' Technology, Hybrid Learning as Emerging Ed-Tech Trends By Danielle Wilson | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Hybrid learning models, motion-based technology and the use of open resources are all expected to become more prevalent in the coming years, according to a new report.
Lou Salza's insight:

While this article divides these emerging technologies into three categories based on predicted adoption rates, these are all happening somewhere right now.  That leads me to ask, how long can it really be until we find these changes and innovations happening in our students' homes and gaming environments? And once that happens, our traditional classrooms are rendered not only obsolete which they are already--but anachronistic-- which is an embarrassment.---Lou

 

Excerpt:

 

"Trends expected in five years or more:

The rapid acceleration of "intuitive technology" is providing a learning experience where learners interact with devices entirely by using natural movements and gestures, the authors of the report say. Motion-based technology through smartphones, tablets, and even game systems allow learners to engage freely. Examples given in the report refer to children using multi-touch walls and interactive displays at museums, and teachers in Virginia using games with motion-based technology improved social and verbal communication skills of students with autism spectrum disorders. Overall changes in the structure of schools are aimed to create innovative school designs and restructuring school schedules to allow more flexibility and cultivate student creativity. The report notes that the multi-disciplinary nature of project-based learning and other models requires subjects to be linked to one another, without the restriction of bell schedules and classrooms. Students at Venture Academy in Minneapolis go to school in a repurposed printing plant without structured classrooms and at High Tech High in San Diego students work freely throughout the school building, designing structures and producing multimedia..."
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Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy by Mia MacKeekin via Katrina Schwartz

Take Action: Verbs That Define Bloom’s Taxonomy by Mia MacKeekin via Katrina Schwartz | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

A neat visualization of the verbs associated with Bloom's Taxonomy.Bloom’s Taxonomy gets an active makeover in this infographic, which provides a way to think about how the actions involved in a class assignment might be categorized in the schema. Mia MacMeekin made this and many other interesting infographics, which can be found on her website, An Ethical Island.

Lou Salza's insight:

Cool and useful!--Lou

 

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I'm a Scientist With Learning Disabilities and That's Okay! by Collin Diedrich @ParentNFamily

I'm a Scientist With Learning Disabilities and That's Okay! by Collin Diedrich @ParentNFamily | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Scientists and engineers (S&E) with LDs is not unheard of: approximately 0.9 percent (311) of all (34531) S&E doctoral recipients in 2011 self identified as having one or more learning disorders. I wish these numbers were higher despite the extensive amount of reading or computing necessary for completion of these degrees and within a career. I wish I could say that individuals with LDs are more likely to succeed than their coworkers without LDs, but I honestly have no idea how LDs correlate to 'success' in S&E.

Lou Salza's insight:

Share this message of resilience and success with students who are print challenged in school. School is not forever! The system in schools may be rigged against children with dyslexia; while the marketplace focuses on what you can do and accomplish. Hang in there!--Lou 

 

Excerpt:

"I hope schools will become more cognizant of identifying and helping students with LDs. I hope research program admission committees can look beyond test scores and GPAs when accepting new students (I was rejected from 7 out of 8 I applied for). I hope students are able to be open about their LDs with their bosses, working together to find the most efficient and helpful ways to have meetings, write papers, perform experiments and present results. I hope that no scientist or engineer with LDs feels like they're alone. But most of all, I hope struggling students and adults with LDs are able to feel good about who they are."

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Institute for Creative Learners is Bringing Hope and Laughter to Central Lubbock's dyslexics

Institute for Creative Learners is Bringing Hope and Laughter to Central Lubbock's dyslexics | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Lubbock, Texas (PRWEB) June 15, 2014 -- Merinda K. Condra, CEO of Generation Covenant, announces Groundbreaking to Begin Construction of New Location of The Institute for Creative Learners. The Institute for Creative Learners fosters a life long love of learning in children by combining art, cutting edge technology, science, and multisensory instruction to help each child obtain academic success while celebrating each child's gifts. -- 3302 67th Street, Lubbock, Texas -- June 17, 2014 10:00 AM
Lou Salza's insight:

Love the sound of this!-Lou

 

Excerpt:

The Institute for Creative Learners is focused on assisting those students who struggle with learning as a result of Dyslexia and other learning differences. However, rather than focus only on the challenges associated with Dyslexia, the Institute seeks to capitalizes on their inherent creativity and artistic ability.

According to Ms. Condra, "These children are 'out-of-the-box' thinkers. They are the innovators, inventors, entrepreneurs, and artists of their generation. In fact, more than one third of successful US entrepreneurs are reportedly dyslexic."

Further, Ms. Condra states, "The children we serve are full of amazing potential that is only limited by what they believe they can do. Without intervention, (the earlier the better) these children can suffer a hit to their self-esteem that can be irreparable. Without intervention, our world can be deprived of their spark – deprived of the next great inventor, artist, or entrepreneur -- deprived of innovations that can make our world better. At the Institute, we help these children see their own potential. We foster their strengths while we address their needs. We nurture their spark."

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28 Things I Want Girls to Know...@AnnKlotz

28 Things I Want Girls to Know...@AnnKlotz | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
I want all girls to know that knowing how to restore themselves, how to take the time to do things that bring joy, solace -- reading for pleasure, yoga, knitting, baking, running, taking a bubble bath -- is time well spent....
Lou Salza's insight:

Ann Klotz offers information, knowledge,  wisdom and inspiration every time she speaks or writes! She is the Head of Laurel School and Co director of the Center for Research on Girls ( CRG) at Laurel school. Dell and I  admire and love Ann Klotz and we love Laurel School!

 

Excerpt:

"......20) getting mad is not irreparable; sometimes we have to get angry in order to bring about change.

21) they can make a difference if elected to office and that some of them MUST take that risk. Each one must vote in every election -- no excuses. Voting is both a right and a privilege.

22) education is the way out of poverty and that education for girls is a critical global issue.

23) money matters and they must know about how to earn it, manage it, save it.

24) doing enough practical things -- using power tools, changing a tire, coping with technology -- helps women feel competent and in charge, but I also want them to know there is no shame in calling a mechanic or a plumber or tech support.

25) their bodies belong to them, always.

26) their health matters; they must be proactive about breast exams and pap smears and encourage their friends and mothers to do the same.

27) knowing how to restore themselves, how to take the time to do things that bring joy, solace -- reading for pleasure, yoga, knitting, baking, running, taking a bubble bath -- is time well spent.

28) they are not alone, that we often feel better after a good night's sleep and that we should all drink more water.

I feel grateful to Carol Gilligan for inspiring me to consider all I want our girls to know. At Laurel, we do not have all the answers, but we are interested in the questions and the many voices we encourage to participate in this conversation. Because we know #29... that learning never ends.

Follow Ann V. Klotz on Twitter: www.twitter.com/AnnKlotz

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A Huge List of Teacher Deals For You! - Edudemic By Katie Lepi

A Huge List of Teacher Deals For You! - Edudemic By Katie Lepi | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

We got this list via email the other day, and since we know everyone loves a good deal, thought it was worth sharing. Compiled by an independent website, it claims to be one of the most thorough lists of deals and discounts for teachers out there. While I can’t confirm that is true, it is certainly one of the most robust lists that I have seen.

As of this writing (08/14), the list is updated, but if you know of any deals that aren’t listed here, let us know! We plan on periodically updating this list as we hear of new things from our community. Leave us a comment below, mention @Edudemic on Twitter or leave your thoughts on our Facebook page.

Lou Salza's insight:

From the folks at Edudemic! Education is woefully under-resourced just about everywhere in the USA, so a list like this can not be ignored! Feed the children!--Lou

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Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson:Help kids with LD Make and Keep Friends Monday, August 25, 2014, 7pm @lawrenceschool

Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson:Help kids with LD Make and Keep Friends  Monday, August 25, 2014, 7pm @lawrenceschool | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

Watching children navigate peer relationships can be stressful and emotional. Some kids seem to instinctively know the rules of friendship while others struggle to feel accepted. One child gets invited everywhere, but another is routinely left out. As adults, how do we know when to step in or stay silent? Our guest speaker will guide us through this maze and offer evidence-based techniques and strategies for helping adolescents learn how to make and keep friends.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pQSeXnELLaQ

Lou Salza's insight:

Important opportunity for parents and educators in NE OH--Lou 

 

About Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson:

As the creator of the PEERS (Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills) model of social skills intervention, Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson is a licensed clinical psychologist and assistant clinical professor in the department of psychiatry and bio-behavioral sciences at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior. She is the founder and director of the UCLA PEERS clinic, a program providing parent-assisted social skills training for adolescents and young adults with ADHD, depression, anxiety and other social impairments.

Presentation: 7:00 pm - 8:30 pm
Q&A: 8:30 pm - 9:00 pm

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Wesleyan University Makes SAT and ACT Tests Optional in Admissions Process satrting next fall

Wesleyan University Makes SAT and ACT Tests Optional in Admissions Process satrting next fall | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Both the SAT and the ACT tests will be optional for high school applicants to Wesleyan University starting next fall, President Michael S. Roth announced this w
Lou Salza's insight:

Common sense at last in the competitive college admissions world!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"..

Both the SAT and the ACT tests will be optional for high school applicants to Wesleyan University starting next fall, President Michael S. Roth announced this week.

The tests, given annually to about three million students in 170 countries, have been part of the Wesleyan admissions process for many years. Wesleyan has required either the SAT with two subject tests, or the ACT. Now the university joins several hundred institutions, including many of its peer colleges, in making the tests optional.

While students’ academic records will continue to be most important in Wesleyan’s admissions decisions, as they always have, applicants may choose whether or not to submit test scores.

“We’ve always been most concerned about the day-to-day work of our applicants, in a rigorous academic program,” said Nancy Hargrave Meislahn, Wesleyan’s dean of admission and financial aid. “This option provides students more control over their applications, how best to present themselves to the admission committee.”

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Family history of dyslexia? No, not us. Wait, what. . . ?

Family history of dyslexia? No, not us. Wait, what. . . ? | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Have you looked into your family history? What have you found? Many times the link can be hidden because people don't like to admit to struggles, and sometimes people with mild to moderate dyslexia find ways to hide it.
Lou Salza's insight:

In my generation and older it was not at all unusual for individuals to be unaware of their dyslexia. Perhaps one indication of our progress is the increasing numbers of young adults who describe being identified and helped while they were in school by special education regulations and programs. --Lou


Excerpt:

"Researchers say that dyslexia likely has a genetic link, but that connection isn’t always apparent. When one Mom blogger was cleaning out her closet (literally), she was surprised to find the link in her own old school records..."


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How to take criticism well

How to take criticism well | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
No one likes getting criticism. But it can be a chance to show off a rare skill: responding to negative feedback well.

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Criticism

 


Via Gust MEES
Lou Salza's insight:

Love the advice here--and the graphic is instructive. If the goal is better performance for our students, then we need to be willing to deal with feedback. Kids handle feedback all the time! What's good for the goslins is probably good for the goose and the gander as well!--Lou

Excerpt:

"....It is a skill that requires practice, humility and a sizable dose of self-awareness. But the ability to learn from criticism fuels creativity at work, studies show, and helps the free flow of valuable communication.

Tempering an emotional response can be hard, especially "if you're genuinely surprised and you're getting that flood of adrenaline and panic," says Douglas Stone, a lecturer at Harvard Law School and co-author of "Thanks for the Feedback...."


"....Some people distort feedback into a devastating personal critique. Mr. Stone suggests writing down: "What is this feedback about, and what is it not about?" Then, change your thinking by eliminating distorted thoughts. "The goal is to get the feedback back into the right-sized box" as a critique of specific aspects of your current performance, he says...

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Mark Dhamma's curator insight, June 29, 12:45 PM

Criticism is feedback, feedback improves performance- Embrace!

Eliane Fierro's curator insight, July 1, 12:20 AM

Embrace criticism!

Philip Powel Smith's curator insight, July 29, 8:04 AM

Criticism is always a difficult pro-active action that educators have to give. Criticism without ridicule and shame is what students need to hear and an explanation of how to make the changes to be better learners and communicators.

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Reading in Summer Gives You Somewhere to Go by Lisa Dabbs, edutopia

Reading in Summer Gives You Somewhere to Go by Lisa Dabbs, edutopia | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Combine the traditional escape and enrichment of summer reading with social media resources for sharing discoveries with like-minded educators and readers.
Lou Salza's insight:

Model reading behavior for our kids; use AT if you find print difficult--but read, and then talk about what you are reading--it's good for us!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"...... some ideas for sharing your summer book reads with friends and family, ideas that might help you to get out there and grow your own interests even farther. Here are three suggestions to get you started on your summer reading travels, even if you're on a "staycation...."

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The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before --Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before --Hansi Lo Wang/NPR | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Aaron Carapella couldn't find a map showing the original names and locations of Native American tribes as they existed before contact with Europeans. That's why the Oklahoma man designed his own map.
Lou Salza's insight:

For teachers and students who want to study First People in North America.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"For more than a decade, he consulted history books and library archives, called up tribal members and visited reservations as part of research for his map project, which began as pencil-marked poster boards on his bedroom wall. So far, he has designed maps of the continental U.S., Canada and Mexico. A map of Alaska is currently in the works.

What makes Carapella's maps distinctive is their display of both the original and commonly known names of Native American tribes, according to Doug Herman, senior geographer at the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C..."

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American Academy of Pediatrics to Recommend Reading Aloud to Children From Birth By MOTOKO RICH, NYT

American Academy of Pediatrics to Recommend Reading Aloud to Children From Birth By MOTOKO RICH, NYT | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
With the increased recognition that reading to children enhances vocabulary and other important skills, the American Academy of Pediatrics is asking its members to become advocates.
Lou Salza's insight:

For parents of babies: Put down the iPads, and pick up the books ( at least 20 minutes each day!) Doctor's Orders!--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"With the increased recognition that an important part of brain development occurs within the first three years of a child’s life, and that reading to children enhances vocabulary and other important communication skills, the group, which represents 62,000 pediatricians across the country, is asking its members to become powerful advocates for reading aloud, every time a baby visits the doctor.

“It should be there each time we touch bases with children,” said Dr. Pamela High, who wrote the new policy. It recommends that doctors tell parents they should be “reading together as a daily fun family activity” from infancy.

This is the first time the academy — which has issued recommendations on how long mothers should nurse their babies and advises parents to keep children away from screens until they are at least 2 — has officially weighed in on early literacy education..."

 

"The pediatricians’ group hopes that by encouraging parents to read often and early, they may help reduce academic disparities between wealthier and low-income children as well as between racial groups. “If we can get that first 1,000 days of life right,” said Dr. Dipesh Navsaria, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, “we’re really going to save a lot of trouble later on and have to do far less remediation.."

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Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
New research shows it’s possible to pick up some of the signs of dyslexia in the brain even before kids learn to read. And this earlier identification may start to substantially influence how parents, educators and clinicians tackle the disorder.
Lou Salza's insight:

Is it just me--or do others find this sort of journalistic "hook" somewhat deceptive?  We really don't need any more multi colored fMRI pictures beside promises of potentially remarkable new approaches to "tackle" dyslexia.  Better perhaps to invest these funds now being used to run kids through fMRIs and invest instead in programs in schools. Let's "tackle" schools and curriculum that refuse to apply the data we already have paid for to alter teaching approaches to address the needs of dyslexic kids. Just sayin'!--Lou

 

Excerpt:Using cutting-edge MRI technology, the researchers are able to pinpoint a specific neural pathway, a white matter tract in the brain’s left hemisphere that appears to be related to dyslexia: It’s called the arcuate fasciculus.

“It’s an arch-shaped bundle of fibers that connects the frontal language areas of the brain to the areas in the temporal lobe that are important for language,” Elizabeth Norton, a neuroscientist at MIT’s McGovern Institute of Brain Research, explains.

In her lab, Norton shows me brain images from the NIH-funded kindergartner study, called READ (for Researching Early Attributes of Dyslexia).

“We see that in children who in kindergarten already have strong pre-reading scores, their arcuate fasciculus is both bigger and more well organized,” she says. On the other hand: “A child with a score of zero has a very small and not particularly organized arcuate fasciculus.”

She says we’re not quite ready to simply take a picture of your child’s brain and say “Aha, this kid is going to have dyslexia,” but we’re getting closer to that point.

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3 Keys To Supporting College Readiness In The U.S. - Edudemic, By Sarah Manix

3 Keys To Supporting College Readiness In The U.S. - Edudemic, By Sarah Manix | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

The topic of college readiness is likely the most discussed topic in the education community today. While the United States high school graduation rate has recently topped 80 percent , this does not mean that 80 percent of our high school graduates are college-ready. …

Lou Salza's insight:

Sarah Manix offers us common sense and a dash of data! Three Keys: 1. Start in Kindergarten. 2. Look beyond grades and test scores to student engagement. 3. Use technology to integrate and apply knowledge assessment data to keep students on track.--Lou

 

Excerpt:

"While it may be presumptuous to predict the college readiness of a kindergartner, it is possible to begin to track areas of strength and weakness. We suggest focusing on elementary predictors of middle school success, middle school predictors of high school success, and high school predictors of college success. In this way, ongoing evaluations give educators the ability to identify any issues a student may have and provide ample time to intervene and help the student get back on track. This is important as the closer students get to high school graduation, the more difficult it becomes to correct course. In fact, according to the ACT report, College and Career Readiness: The Importance of Early Learning, “students who were far off track in eighth grade had only a 10 percent chance in reading, 6 percent chance in science, and 3 percent chance in mathematics of reaching the ACT College Readiness Benchmarks by twelfth grade. In higher poverty schools, those numbers were 6 percent, 3 percent, and 3 percent, respectively.....”

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10 Powerful iPad Apps For English And History - Edudemic By Diana Neebe @dneebe

10 Powerful iPad Apps For English And History - Edudemic By Diana Neebe @dneebe | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it

When I first started teaching English with 1:1 iPads, I was really jealous of the science and fine arts teachers. They had all of the most engaging apps, and I was left with a lowly word processor and an instant thesaurus. …

Lou Salza's insight:

Robust, Nimble, Mobile and Practical! Any questions!? --Lou

 

 

Excerpt:

"Fortunately, so much has changed. I now have the flexibility to duck in and out of my students’ papers as they write and leave them comments on drafts in progress. I have the resources to connect them with a real-world network of readers who authentically guide them to books they will enjoy through reviews and ratings. As a class, we can collaborate on a challenging text, asking questions of each other in shared annotations.

During the research process, students have tools to keep their ideas organized, and their resources available to others with similar interests. What follows are my top ten picks for apps that support the writing process, reading engagement, critical reading skills, and research in the humanities."

 

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Executive Functioning in Emerging Adults TY! @Strugglingteens

Executive Functioning in Emerging Adults TY! @Strugglingteens | Students with dyslexia & ADHD in independent and public schools | Scoop.it
Parth Gandhi, PhD, a clinical neuropsychologist who specializes in the clinical assessment of adolescents and young adults, explained how Executive Function skills can determine if a young adult will be successfully independent.
Lou Salza's insight:

From our good friend and colleague Lon Woodbury!


Excerpt:

An emerging adult is one that has either turned 18 or is an adolescent growing toward adulthood. As a neuropsychologist focusing on assessments, Parth looks at young adults 18 and over who are not functioning well and question why? "I think we have less expectations for young adults now and we've become softer, less willing to let them fail," he said. "Yet, these kids need to learn from failure and they need earlier training from their parents. Kids aren't being challenged and they need those challenges to learn and grow from. When we protect them, we take away their skill building. I think it is a cultural issue and a family issue, but working with your children needs to be strategic.

- See more at: http://www.strugglingteens.com/artman/publish/WRI-K4HD_140602_-2.shtml#sthash.W52Mxasl.dpuf

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Barbara Hunter's curator insight, June 16, 4:49 AM

Good information! We can't wait to see if EF skills are in place, parents and professionals must guide growth.  By "guide growth" I mean, understand the processes of EF, assess strengths and challenges in children very young, as they are emerging, and engage in metacognitive, direct, and strategic support.