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Clear Signs of Digitally Connected School Leaders

Clear Signs of Digitally Connected School Leaders | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Are the leaders in your school and/or school district digitally connected? Being a connected educator today is one of the most important hallmarks of effective twenty-first century leadership. How ...

Via Felix Jacomino
Jennifer Colin's insight:

I did not find this article of much use, as I do not agree with the premise: "Being a connected educator today is one of the most important hallmarks of effective twenty-first century leadership."  Mmmm.... I don't know about that.  Being digitally connected is a positive thing, but I would not concur that it's a major tenet of providing quality leadership.  The author does concede, "Of course simply HAVING a twitter account doesn’t automatically equate to being a connected educator."  In my opinion, Twitter or no, if you're not a good leader, any amount of technology is not going to help you become one. We need to be careful not to overemphasize technology. There is a definite place for it, but it does not replace the core significance of knowledgeable and personable school leaders.  Our administrator has taken our school leaps and bounds over the last decade, and he doesn't even have a Facebook page.

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Erin Ryan's curator insight, October 15, 2015 8:58 PM

Interesting to me that leadership "now-a'days" requires a digitally connected person. I have to admit that this "scoop it thing has turned my facebook into a pedestal for all of my idealistic educational philosophies. It does make me sit back and think deeply about topics that are important in my career but does it make me better at my job and more successful at it? Not so sure. I go back and forth with technology. We have a love/hate relationship. I think it can be distracting and take away from the essence of face to face communication. With that said, it is here to stay so I will continue to brace it.

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The Dynamics of Listening - Huffington Post

The Dynamics of Listening - Huffington Post | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
My suggestions are most easily applied in settings where both teachers and students have considerable autonomy, but I hope these ideas may be useful to teachers even in traditional settings....

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Jennifer Colin's insight:

As a former social worker and current school counselor, this article on listening caught my eye.  Listening is a definite skill and can be a huge asset when done correctly.  This article is written to teachers in dealing with students, but could very easily be translated to administrators in dealing with teachers.  Becoming a listener involves offering dialogue rather than lecture, collaboration instead of dictation.  This is great advice for school leaders when it comes to both teachers and students. Listen. Really listen. And you'll be surprised what you can learn.   

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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, May 1, 2015 11:36 AM

Listening is a vital tool in any leadership setting.

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(EN) - Glossary of Legislative Terms | Michigan Legislature

(EN) - Glossary of Legislative Terms | Michigan Legislature | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"The Michigan Legislature Website is a free service of the Legislative Internet Technology Team in cooperation with the Michigan Legislative Council, the Michigan House of Representatives, and the Michigan Senate."


Via Stefano KaliFire
Jennifer Colin's insight:

As a future administrator who is currently trying to learn more about the Michigan legislative process, this Glossary of Legislative Terms is a great resource!  Now when I am reading an article and come across a term or phrase I do not understand, I have a tool to help me decipher the meaning!  As I learn more about becoming a school leader, the importance of being involved in policy is increasingly obvious.  As we have only one class on this topic in our leadership program, I would like to expand my current knowledge so that I can be aware of what is happening in our state, and what I can work for what is best for Michigan's students. 

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Mentoring: An Essential Leadership Skill - Career Development from MindTools.com

Mentoring: An Essential Leadership Skill - Career Development from MindTools.com | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
As a leader, you need to be able to nurture and develop your staff. This is why mentoring is a key part of leadership. Find out what's involved so that you can decide whether you should embark on it.

Via Dawn Bentley
Jennifer Colin's insight:

Over the past several years I have learned the importance of mentoring as a leadership skill through my principal mentoring me.  He has done many of the things the article lists: encouraged and motivated me, shared his knowledge and experience, contributed to my growth and success, challenged me, added to my sense of contribution, and contributed toward my career goals. As cheesy as it sounds, I honestly would not be an aspiring administrator today if it were not for him taking the time to invest in me as a future leader.  I hope to be able to do the same for others one day as a school leader myself.  The best schools are those who grow their own leaders and continue achieving success, even when leadership changes. 

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Lead Your Team To Effectively Use Technology To Learn

Lead Your Team To Effectively Use Technology To Learn | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Ensuring employees have ample opportunity to learn and develop is crucial to organizational success. Yet, leaders can be bombarded with messages to increase the use of technology if they want the m...

Via Dawn Bentley
Jennifer Colin's insight:

"As a leader, how do you judge which learning modality will lead to the most effective, quality learning experience? How do you appeal to learners on your teams at differing levels of technological savviness?"  This is an excellent article on leading your teachers to effectively use technology.  The key steps of understanding how your team learns, determining their favorite modalities, and then selecting limited options are sound advice for a leader.  Administrators deal with an unbelievable number of tasks and expectations, and among those is integrating technology into their schools.  To someone who is most definitely not a tech expert, these three simple steps provide a great place to start.  I will most certainly be referring to this article again in the future. 

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Kamakshi Rajagopal's comment, April 12, 2013 1:36 PM
Hi Dawn, we are conducting an experiment on Scoop.IT pages on education at the Open Universiteit (NL). Would you like to participate? Sign up here: http://bit.ly/14QR9oa
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Common Core Math is Not the Enemy

Common Core Math is Not the Enemy - Math Memoirs - Medium
why you hate it and why we need new perspective in education

Via Patti Kinney
Jennifer Colin's insight:

YES, finally!--an article that sensibly and logically explains why we are teaching Common Core math.  This is an EXCELLENT resource for both math teachers and administrators to keep on file when parents have questions about "the new math." I'll admit, as one who learned math the old skool way, I feel pretty helpless when it comes to assisting my son with his homework.  But knowing why there has been a change, and that the method will help students retain these skills for the long term, I am completely on board.  Understanding this as a parent will help me understand and explain it as an educator. And being able to answer the "why" goes a long why in getting parents on board with Common Core.

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Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:45 PM

Local, State, and Federal

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How to Build Effective Goals in 4 Easy Steps

How to Build Effective Goals in 4 Easy Steps | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
What's the difference between someone who's always stuck in the planning phase and someone who actually achieves their goals? It boils down to proper goal definitions. In short, actionable goals are much more effective than vague generalities. For example, saying "I'm going to learn a new language" is a vague goal. It offers no actionable steps that you…

Via Skip Zalneraitis
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This is a great tool for anyone, but I think it would work especially well for me as I become a new administrator.  The differentiation between vague and actionable goals is key and helpful in writing goals that can realistically be accomplished.  By setting sub-goals and making action plans, as well as building in "if-then" scenarios, you increase the chances of reaching your goals.  I can see this being very effective for keeping focus, especially if the school board or management company has tasks or problems they want you to address.  "Raising enrollment" is vague, but "Enrolling 10 more students by the end of the school year" is actionable.  This is definitely an article I will hold on to for future use!

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Help Shy Kids-- Don't Punish Them

Help Shy Kids-- Don't Punish Them | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"All children should learn how to make their voices heard. But grading them on class participation may not be the answer. I'm also old-fashioned enough to believe that grades should assess a child's proficiency at math or science or history, not their ability to speak in front of a large group. Knowledge matters. Deep thought matters. Mastery of a subject matters -- even in a world that can't stop talking. It is not irrelevant that American schools, which value verbal confidence at least as highly as quiet study, are falling behind their international peers. But here's an idea, recently advocated by the Montclair State University education professor Emily Klein: What about giving one grade for mastery of the material, and a separate grade for character? These character-based grades would reward students who contribute meaningfully to class discussion (not just speaking up to hear themselves talk). They would also value other personal characteristics such as empathy, courage, persistence, listening skills, and respect for others. Shy kids are often brimming with these qualities -- to the benefit of us all. According to recent studies from the University of Michigan and San Diego State University, young people today are less empathetic, more narcissistic, and more self-centered than their predecessors. In a me-first world, shyness can be a civilizing force." | via The Atlantic


Via Todd Reimer
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This is an interesting counter to an article on shy students I previously posted.  This author disagrees with the earlier premise that shy students should be forced to speak out in order to learn how to function in society.  I have mixed feelings on this.  It is true some students are more introverted than others, but I agree with the first author that they will need to learn how to speak in front of others, for a number of reasons.  This leads me to an interesting dilemma. How would I approach a teacher who grades more heavily on class participation?  This is an area I would like to devote further research to in order to have a better understanding on what is appropriate and realistic for teachers to expect from introverted students.

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Hannah Lindsey's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:58 PM

This is a useful article for teachers with students who have anxiety disorders or are introverted. It provides tips and suggestions to help shyer students participate with the class without causing severe social anxiety.

Aaron Louis Buduan's curator insight, August 22, 2015 9:06 AM

They say, "Knowledge will help you get a job. But, Character, Personality and Attitude will predict and will help you for staying in that job."

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How Teachers, Parents Can Help Sleepy Teens Stay Awake at School

How Teachers, Parents Can Help Sleepy Teens Stay Awake at School | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
When a later school start time isn't an option, parents and teachers can help teens develop healthy sleep habits, one expert says.

Via Mel Riddile
Jennifer Colin's insight:

Teens in class with their heads on their desks is not an unfamiliar sight, and it can be a frustrating occurrence for teachers.  This article sheds some light on the issue.  I was unaware that there is a shift in teens' circadian rhythms when they hit puberty which delays both bedtime and waking.  In that respect, a later school start time does make sense.  However, this is unrealistic for most districts, so the other strategies mentioned in the article are helpful, especially the ones involving devices.  Studies have shown that use of electronics before bedtime is detrimental to sleep.  Administrators can help support their teachers by passing on these suggestions  which they can then discuss with students.  It is amazing how many times students will make a change in behavior simply because a teacher or administrator suggests it.    

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10 things classroom teachers need to know about modern school librarians | Trust me, I'm a librarian

10 things classroom teachers need to know about modern school librarians | Trust me, I'm a librarian | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

1) We hate quiet. Oh, sure, the typical view of a librarian is an older woman, in a cardigan and cat-eye glasses, with a tight bun, shushing everyone who dares to make a sound.


Via Bookmarking Librarian
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This is a very insightful article about school librarians.  I did not previously realize that school librarian positions require a Master's degree and a license.  Although, sadly, I feel school librarians will go the way of paper books at some point in the future, school administrators should take full advantage of this resource while it is still available.  Our school no longer has a library, but it is my hope that the school in which I obtain a principal position will have one.  I love that this author took the time to counter the age-old stereotypes that persist, and that she explains her purpose and her value.  Any school which still manages to have a library and a librarian is a lucky one at that!  I will encourage my teachers to set up regular library visits and to use the librarian to her full potential in teaching the students.

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6 Models of Blended Learning Teachers Should Know About

6 Models of Blended Learning Teachers Should Know About | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"Blended Learning is a big concept, an umbrella term, that contains several other sub-methods. Below are the four models that are most used in schools today. According to Dreambox, the creator of this graphic, blended learning models are divided into 6 main categories..."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV
Jennifer Colin's insight:

I find it interesting that the author refers to this chart as containing six models of blended learning, when four of the six involve scant or no face-to-face learning.  However, it is important for teachers to realize there are different levels of blended learning since it is quite a vague topic.  As a future school leader I need to learn about the varying approaches to blended learning and realize for myself what I expect from teachers when a blended model is recommended.  Blended models seem to becoming increasingly popular, so being familiar with what is available and working is an important task for any administrator.  

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 22, 2015 10:44 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

Shelly Reckow VanVoorst's curator insight, October 25, 2015 6:06 PM

I scooped this graphic because I believe that as educators we need to be aware of the different types of blended learning.  Blended learning is not just a one size fits all, and in fact has many options to creatively work with students to help them gain the knowledge they desire.  I hope that educators who are considering blended learning of any form look at this graphic, and digest first the amount of students who take part in an blended learning opportunity, but then also consider the different aspects of how blended learning can be applied.

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Hey, New Teachers, It's OK To Cry In Your Car

Hey, New Teachers, It's OK To Cry In Your Car | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Getting through October and November can be tough for first-year teachers. Having someone along for the ride can help, and a veteran teacher near Miami offers hope and advice.

Via Patti Kinney
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This article offers an additional resource for novice teachers who may be struggling with their first year. Veteran teacher Roxanna Elden has developed a free "disillusionment power pack," a month of motivating emails she sends every few days.  If administrators are being realistic, they will acknowledge that what they offer new staff is probably not sufficient, and unfortunately not everyone will get a mentor they necessarily click with.  Though these emails may seem like a small thing, a simple, easy resource such as this just may be the extra encouragement needed for a teacher to make it through the day.  I would definitely encourage my new teachers to subscribe to these e-mails. 

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Rescooped by Jennifer Colin from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Ten Ways New Teachers Burn Themselves Out - Brilliant or Insane

While teacher attrition rates have recently stabilized, almost half of new teachers leave before their five year anniversary. How can we combat burn out?

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This a great article addressing the reasons behind high attrition rates in the teaching profession.  New teachers should be warned about this "top ten list" in order to set more realistic goals and expectations for themselves. Working too much, taking on multiple roles, and trying to please everyone will certainly lead to early burn-out.  As an administrator I think I would sit down with each new teacher to advise them that these are commonly made mistakes they can avoid when they are aware of them.  A lot of work goes into becoming a teacher, and seeing so many leave so soon is disheartening.  Providing them support and encouragement, especially during the first year, can help. This article also offers a great starting point for mentors to go over with their mentees in letting them know it's okay they're not perfect.  None of us is, and the sooner we realize and accept that, the sooner we are on the path to becoming great teachers.  I will definitely keep this on file for future use! 

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KaylaHeinlein's curator insight, October 25, 2015 10:22 AM

Teacher burn out is a huge topic in education.  This article gives great information regarding teacher burn out.  Administrators could help with this by researching and reading articles like this. 

Jamie Dammann's curator insight, October 25, 2015 9:18 PM

Teacher Issue:

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Early-Childhood Education Has Strong Bipartisan Support—and Weak Federal Investment - The Atlantic

Early-Childhood Education Has Strong Bipartisan Support—and Weak Federal Investment - The Atlantic | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
A poll suggests that Americans think the federal government has its education priorities reversed.

Via Scott R. Furtwengler, PhD
Jennifer Colin's insight:

On the tails of an article about what students need to know upon entering kindergarten comes a report about the relatively few public prekindergarten options in the United States.  With the high costs of caring for and educating children continue until they enter kindergarten, this is a need that is going largely unmet.  Ironically enough, it is also one that both political parties agree upon.  So why isn't it being addressed?  With daycare costs exceeding that of tuition and fees at a public four year university, it's time for the federal government to do something about it.  This is one area teachers and school administrators can get involved in in pushing for legislature that will provide increased opportunities for this early education.  

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How do you get tech-resistant teachers to embrace change? | eSchool News | eSchool News

How do you get tech-resistant teachers to embrace change? | eSchool News | eSchool News | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Many millions of dollars have been wasted over the years by the well-intentioned, but ad hoc, introduction of technology into education. Eager tech savvy teachers or administrators may jump in feet first, but a significant portion of their colleagues are left struggling along or resisting the change.

Via Pippa Davies @PippaDavies
Jennifer Colin's insight:

Technology integration is the wave of the future, but let's face it--every school has teachers who drag their feet when it comes to change, especially when that change involves technology.  So how do you get tech-resistant teachers to embrace the change?  This article gives five steps that guide you in doing so.  These five changes of adoption make sense and would not be difficult to utilize.  I would definitely refer to this plan as a school leader who is implementing technological changes into the school.  Educating the staff on what is to come is key with any change.  When it comes to technology, this is especially important so that we are doing what we can to help those teachers who are not tech savvy to feel more comfortable and know what to expect.

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Pippa Davies @PippaDavies 's curator insight, July 16, 2015 4:27 PM

Teaching teachers #edtech is ongoing and be at different levels to incorporate all learning styles and skills.

Jennifer McGuff's curator insight, August 1, 2015 4:36 PM

Teaching teachers #edtech is continual and be at different levels to incorporate all learning styles and skills.

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CDC: Student Tobacco Use Down by 64% But Marijuana Use Doubles

CDC: Student Tobacco Use Down by 64% But Marijuana Use Doubles | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analyzes tobacco and marijuana use among white, African American, and Hispanic students in grades 9 through 12 from 1997 to 2013. The data come from CDC’s Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS) conducted every two years.
 
The good news is that student use of cigarettes and cigars has declined 64 percent, from 20.5 percent in 1997 to 7.4 percent in 2013. The bad news is that marijuana use more than doubled during that time, from 4.2 percent to 10.2 percent.
 
Further, marijuana use among students who also used cigarettes or cigars increased from 51.2 percent to 62.4 percent over that time, with even higher increases towards the end of the study period among African American and Hispanic students.
 
The use of marijuana among those who used cigarettes or cigars did not change among Hispanic students from 1997 to 2007, but then escalated from 54.9 percent to 73.6 percent in 2013. African American students’ marijuana use among those who used cigarettes and cigars held steady until 2009, but increased even further, from 66.4 percent then to 82 percent in 2013.
 
When tobacco and marijuana are used together, the likelihood of harm to individuals, including cognitive, psychological, respiratory, and addiction problems, also increases.
 
The substantial 64 percent decline in cigarette and cigar use among students took place as the result of evidence-based strategies such as increasing tobacco product prices, adopting comprehensive smoke-free policies, and conducting national public education media campaigns.
 
Read “Cigarette, Cigar, and Marijuana Use Among High School Students—United States—1997-2013” here.


Via ReactNow
Jennifer Colin's insight:

An earlier Scoop discussed the astounding increase in marijuana use among high school seniors and college students.  I proposed we would soon see that increase spread to grades 9-11.  It turns out I was already correct.  According to this article, cigarette smoke among this population is also down, but marijuana use has also doubled. It is apparent that education on the harm marijuana causes needs to be "ramped up" in schools.  Now that students understand the dangers of tobacco, it is important for them to realize that marijuana is just as detrimental to the body.  As a future school administrator it will be important to ensure that this education is being implemented, and that I be extra cognizant of those students who may be following in the marijuana trend.  

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10 Leadership Practices to Stop Today

10 Leadership Practices to Stop Today | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
If you want to be the best in your industry, you have to get rid of your outdated management style.

Via Dawn Bentley
Jennifer Colin's insight:

Although this article is written with a business slant, it can definitely be applied to the world of education.  The author stresses that, in today's world, people need to be told WHY they are doing something in addition to doing it.  This would seem especially important in the world of education, where Common Core is emphasizing WHY  students are doing the things they do.  Should we not be modeling ourselves what we are expecting from our students?  As a future administrator, these "new school" practices are very valuable, especially this one:  "It is no longer enough to be visible. Watching and listening, engaging in conversation, implementing the ideas presented to you, and distributing the results" are all things that administrators should be doing in order to do the job well.

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MI: Students learn important lessons from robotics program | Bob Gross | The Times Herald

MI: Students learn important lessons from robotics program | Bob Gross | The Times Herald | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Riese Goerlich was dressed as a knight — with armor, helmet and shield — and was having a great time Saturday.

“I happen to be our team’s mascot,” said Riese, who is 15 and a freshman at Port Huron Northern High School.

The atmosphere inside the St. Clair County Community College gymnasium was as sweltering and as loud as a basketball game with 12 student robotics teams competing in the first RoboFrenzy, hosted by the Eastern Michigan Manufacturing Association.

Riese is a member of the Mechanum Knights, a combined robotics team from Port Huron and Port Huron Northern high schools.

“It’s something I always wanted to do,” she said. “I wanted to go up there and build something kind of cool and exciting.”

The season for the FIRST Robotics League in Michigan ended with the state championship April 8-11. The teams now get to compete in local events such as RoboFrenzy.

Each participating team received $1,000. The winner, The Spartronics from Imlay City High School, also received $750; the second-place team, The Blue Devils from Richmond High School, received $500; and the Marysville High School Vi-Bots also received $500 as the team with the most spirit.

“We wanted to bring this to St. Clair County Community College because we have such fantastic robotics teams here,” said Dan Casey, executive director of the Economic Development Alliance of St. Clair County.

He said the EDA has been working with educators to promote science, technology, engineering and math learning — and having students build and operate robots is a good fit.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This article highlights the value of a robotics team in Michigan.  This group promotes science, technology, engineering, and math,  as well as helping students learn to work together as a team.  As a future administrator it is important to become educated on all types of ideas for extracurricular learning opportunities.  Robotics teams in Michigan are increasing in popularity despite the cost involved.  I would certainly consider encouraging the formation of a robotics team at my future school, although I would first need to research the budget and time commitment involved.  I especially value these types of groups for those who may not be athletically inclined but still want to be involved with a team.

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When Educators Make Space For Play and Passion, Students Develop Purpose

When Educators Make Space For Play and Passion, Students Develop Purpose | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
These teachers made room for playful exploration and student passions in the classroom, helping their students to develop the purpose that drives them.

Via Kathleen McClaskey
Jennifer Colin's insight:

I have long been an advocate of finding activities that promote creativity and innovation in students.  The seven key skills Tony Wagner lists for students don't involve any specific content.  While I do believe these are vitally important, it seems unlikely that they will replace specific academic standards any time soon.  Because fostering creativity has been an important part of my life, and I have seen it do wonders in the lives of students, I would definitely encourage my teachers to utilize teaching methods and activities that enable this to occur.  Interdisciplinary learning, team collaboration, risk taking, and cultivated intrinsic motivation are definite assets to students in the real world.  But in our present situation we as educators need to find ways to pass on these valuable lessons while still teaching reading, writing, and arithmetic.  

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Kathleen McClaskey's curator insight, August 25, 2015 12:39 PM

Discover why it is important for learners to discover their passion through play so that they can find their purpose.

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Collaboration Among All Teachers of Second Language Learners-WIDA and commoncore

Collaboration Among All Teachers of Second Language Learners-WIDA and commoncore | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Recently I participated in the three-day professional development workshop series to support teachers and administrators that are working toward full use of the World Class Instructional Design and Assessment (WIDA) structure.


Via Darren Burris
Jennifer Colin's insight:

As the current testing coordinator at our school, this article was of interest.  In the past years we have transitioned from ELPA to WIDA in assessing for ELL students.  It appears this test is here for the long haul, as this year we will be administering it completely online.  How the WIDA fits in with Common Core is a great question, and one administrators should know the answer to.  The answer is complex and requires more than reading one article. But as a future school leader I will definitely be pursuing more information on the connection between these tests, and how we can use WIDA results to help our ELL students learn and succeed with the Common Core standards.

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Grand Rapids, school leaders to tag-team lawmakers on top priorities | Monica Scott | MLive.com

Grand Rapids, school leaders to tag-team lawmakers on top priorities | Monica Scott | MLive.com | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Encouraging the state to make targeted investments in cities is just one item on a joint list of legislative priorities the city and Grand Rapids Public Schools would lobby lawmakers to support.

This week the school board's Adhoc Legislative Committee got a rundown of state and federal priorities they could tag-team from Haris Alibasic, legislative affairs director for the city of Grand Rapids.

"We work closely with the governor's office to encourage the state to really look at cities as economic development engines, but also engines where art, education and all the other elements that make a community successful and are important to take into consideration," Alibasic said.

"We are really looking at targeted investments that leverage district assets in urban and metropolitan areas to transform regional economies."

In 2011, Gov. Rick Snyder created the Michigan Office of Urban and Metropolitan Initiatives, responsible for finding ways to revitalize the economies of Michigan's major cities. The sustainable city effort is seen as building on the office.

City and school leaders have said the fate of the city and the future of its schools are inextricably linked. Last October, the district did approve a list of top legislative priorities it is already lobbying lawmakers on, including expanding sinking fund tax to include security and technology, and returning retirees to the classroom without losing benefits.

 

Click headline to read more and access hot link--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This is a great example of school leaders actively seeking to make positive changes through legislative means.  Outlining priorities, along with explanations as to why they are important, can make a difference.  It is important for school administrators to be aware of what is lacking in their districts, their cities, and their states, and to do something about it if they don't like what they see.  This is one area I am attempting to learn more about as an aspiring administrator. Politics have never been of great interest to me, but that is going to have to change as I enter the world of school leadership.  I want to be as knowledgeable as possible so that I can help my school in every way I can.

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McTeacher's nights: Teachers unions say no to school fundraisers : The Salt : NPR

McTeacher's nights: Teachers unions say no to school fundraisers : The Salt : NPR | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

"The fundraising events cast schoolteachers as servers at local McDonald's. Supporters say the events bring families and teachers closer. Critics say they turn teachers into billboards for fast food ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
Jennifer Colin's insight:

"Watch your teachers serve you" advertises a flier for McTeacher's nights.  I find this whole concept ridiculous, and I am happy individuals took the time to stand against it.  Teachers complained that this event turned them into billboards and only resulted in a small cut of profit for the school.  In addition, it promoted food well-known for its detriment to health, while many students today already don't eat well.  I agree with everything this article states, and it demonstrates that administrators need to take many things into consideration before agreeing to marketing events or fundraisers.  How does the event reflect on the school and what message(s) is the event sending? How is it benefiting the school and/or the students?  These are things that should be carefully scrutinized.  As a school leader I would have a problem with McTeacher's nights.  But I have learned when you disagree with something, you get better results by having an alternate solution.  Therefore, I would have a proposal for something else that could result in the same, or even better, results.    

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Rescooped by Jennifer Colin from Middle Level Leadership
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How parents and teachers should talk to each other

Students aren’t the only ones who have homework. We parents also have an ongoing assignment: building, nurturing and maintaining a relationship with our kids’ teachers. “The level of success a child experiences during a school year is definitely enhanced by communication and cooperation between parents and teachers,” former LAUSD kindergarten and middle school teacher (and mom) Wendy Kennar said.


Via Patti Kinney
Jennifer Colin's insight:

This article is written from a parent perspective, but the same holds true when the tables are turned.  Parents entrust teachers with the most precious people in their lives, and both teachers and parents desire to form and facilitate the development of their children.  To that end, doesn't it make sense that parents and teachers should work to develop good relationships?  Communication between parents and teachers can prove tricky, especially when discipline is involved.  As a school leader I will encourage teachers to reach out to parents via phone or email--not just when they have misbehaved, but just as often when they are doing well or making improvements.  Regular contact between parents and teachers is so important to helping a child succeed.  It is also important for administrators to make themselves available when there are issues that need to be discussed.  Trying to support teachers while still listening to parents is rarely an easy balance.  But it's one that great administrators will strive to achieve.

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How Stress Affects Your Body - A TED-Ed Lesson - Free Technology for Teachers

How Stress Affects Your Body - A TED-Ed Lesson - Free Technology for Teachers | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Hopefully, as you read this you've had a relaxing weekend absent of stress. As we all know, stress can do some odd things to us. From headaches to backaches to just flat-out getting sick, being stressed is not fun for anyone. But why do our bodies react to stress? And which systems in our bodies are impacted by stress? The answer to those questions and more are found in a new TED-Ed lesson How Stress Affects Your Body.

Via John Evans
Jennifer Colin's insight:

"Stress is a hard -wired, physical response that travels throughout your entire body."  There is profound truth in this statement.  Since everyone's body is different, everyone will experience stress in different ways, but symptoms such as headaches are common.  It is an important task for teachers to remind their students to do their best to eat well and get enough rest, but equally important for administrators to remind their teachers to do the same!  As an administrator I will also offer my teachers effective ways to relieve stress and decompress when feeling overwhelmed. (Yes, being a former counselor will come in handy many times, I think!)  Teachers can't be there for the students as they should be when they are stressed, and administrators need to help ensure the staff is staying as healthy as possible. (Administrators also need to make sure they are taking the time to care for themselves as well! )

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It only happens in America: Idaho school district buys guns, ammo to train teachers to shoot

It only happens in America: Idaho school district buys guns, ammo to train teachers to shoot | EDL 773 | Scoop.it

Following the recent spate of school and college shootings, administrators at a school district outside Boise, Idaho voted earlier this year to purchase four rifles, 2,000 rounds of ammunition, and to train some staff to shoot.


Via ReactNow
Jennifer Colin's insight:

I can see, on one hand, why this town would feel justified in having guns and ammunition on campus in case of emergency.  However, as a future school administrator, I will always be dead against this happening anywhere I am leading.  Teachers are in charge of protecting their students, yes.  But when a crazed armed person arrives on campus, who is to say that any less harm will come to anyone, just because there are additional guns?  In fact, we are now placing even more responsibility on a teacher who will already be in a state of panic and even sheer terror by expecting them to sensibly operate a weapon.  I feel the potential for disaster from guns on campus far outweighs any assistance they might offer during a school shooting that most likely will never occur.  I am sure there are others on the opposite side of this fence, but as long as I have it in my control, my teachers would not ever have guns.

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Trump: Deptartment Of Education Must Go

Trump: Deptartment Of Education Must Go | EDL 773 | Scoop.it
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump declared that in order to cut federal spending he wants to eliminate the Department of Education on

Via Thomas Wentzel
Jennifer Colin's insight:

Cutting federal spending is not a bad idea.  Cutting federal spending by eliminating the Department of Education is ludicrous.  Trump is obviously anti-Common Core, but he isn't informed enough to even realize that it is adopted individually by states and the federal government does not control it.  This is a prime example of why we as a country find ourselves in the places we do at times. People in positions of power who really have no idea about education and how it works are making these types of decisions.  This article further reinforces the need be informed about what is happening on both the state and federal levels, and for teachers and administrators to continually communicate with our legislators.  Because despite the fact that no one who is orange and doesn't know how to comb his hair should have any say in the future of America's students, it may happen.  And should it become reality, we need to be as involved as possible in what is happening with policy and the future education of our children. 

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