Structure and Organization
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Rebalancing the Workplace—A Preview of the 2013 U.S. Workplace Survey - Workplace Strategy and Design - Gensler

Rebalancing the Workplace—A Preview of the 2013 U.S. Workplace Survey - Workplace Strategy and Design - Gensler | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
Confidential Consulting Firm, New York, N.Y. Image © Gensler

Gensler has completed t...
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A new 2013 US Workplace Survey conducted by Gensler that studies what a high-performance workplace looks like for today's knowledge worker found that workplace design that supports the ability to focus and the ability to collaborate is an essential framework. The survey found that employees who can effectively focus are 57% more able to collaborate, 88% more able to learn, and 42% more able to socialize in their workplace than their peers who are unable to focus. They are also more satisfied with their jobs and more satisfied with their workplaces.
Interestingly, the survey also found that many U.S. knowledge workers are less able to focus than in 2008, a trend Gensler attributed to open office environments that have swung too far, with too much emphasis on open communication and not enough on focus. Open work environments and under-provided spaces to meet and collaborate have also eroded overall effectiveness and stifling productivity and innovation.
Gensler advocates a balanced approach between focus and collaboration complemented by the right policies that increases innovation by leveraging choice and autonomy in the workplace, such as organizational policies that offer choices in when, where, and how to work.

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MaRSReport-Labs-designing-the-future_2012.pdf

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The article introduced to us the innovation lab, a type of participatory user-centric approach adopted by organizations to solve problems. Due to our connectedness in today's world, we live in a world where there is a highly dynamic, thriving shared space for ideas, connection and creation. Innovations and alternative solutions for problems are encouraged to develop so as to tackle complex problems that cannot be solved by individuals working independently. A positive shift in design took place when organizations remove the focus from the object and instead emphasize the approach, which generates attention on systems rather than on superficial changes. For this to happen, innovation labs, which focus on diversity of perspectives and skill sets, were developed, and the article raised a few case studies of different innovation labs to explain the ongoing trend.

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ManagingWBrainInMind.pdf

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The article begin by introducing the link between social connection and physical discomfort within the brain, thus showing that the brain is a social organ, whereby its physiological and neurological reactions are directly and profoundly shaped by social interaction. Leaders who understand this can effectively engage their employees’ best talents and create an environment that fosters productive change. By nature, the human brain aims to minimize danger/threat and maximize reward.  Five particular qualities enable employees and executives alike to minimize the threat response and instead enable the reward response: status, certainty, autonomy, relatedness, and fairness (SCARF). Effective management of these qualities will maximize productivity and efficiency in an organization.

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The Innovation Catalysts

The Innovation Catalysts | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
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This article talks about how Intuit found an alternative to the "Steve job model of success". The success of Apple comes from a powerful visionary at the top, something that Intuit lacks. Thus,Intuit decided to find alternatives: developing grassroots of the company to drive success in innovation and customer delight. To promote design at Intuit, a team of design-thinking coaches, called "innovation catalysts" was created to help the managers work on initiatives throughout the organizations. The focus of this team is to adopt a broad perspective in designing things, involving talking to users and solve the user's problems in a delightful way, on top of depending on designer's own genius.

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Authentic Spaces: A Catalyst For Social Innovation | Business Lexington

Authentic Spaces: A Catalyst For Social Innovation | Business Lexington | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
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This article discusses on the need to create space for social innovation. Examples of the creation of spaces in many different towns or cities are being mentioned to show the need to create space for social innovation. One of which includes events such as the Farmers Market and Thursday Night Live held at the Fifth Third Pavilion transformed that vital part of the city into a destination, a place where people show up just to enjoy the group experience.

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OP-3-2010-NetworkingDistributedPublicExpertise-v2.pdf

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This paper challenges conventional notions of the wisdom of crowds, arguing that distributed intelligence must be well structured by technical platforms and management strategies. The paper also explains how collaborative networking can be used to harness the distributed expertise of citizens, as distinguished from citizen consultation, which seeks to engage citizens – each on an equal footing. This paper goes on to explain why the governments should use this networking strategy as a means to inform policy and decision-making. Lastly, the paper brings in a set of nine strategies for fostering the bottom-up development of government initiatives aimed at harnessing distributed public expertise.

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Simpler, and better | Inside Story

Simpler, and better | Inside Story | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
A new book by Barack Obama’s former “regulatory czar” shows how government can harness the benefits of behavioural economics, writes Richard Denniss
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The article introduces a book by Cass R. Sunstein, "Simpler". The book talks about the importance of simplifying regulations, reducing the time and money spent collecting and collating information, shortening the lengthy and complex forms that government agencies typically rely on and, trying to ensure that all government regulations were assessed using the principles of cost-benefit analysis. The book provides powerful examples of how small changes in what government do can make big differences in society, and efficient provision of services, be it public or private. The book generally provides a good insight on behavioural economics.  

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1. Meeting the challenge of change - Capabilities Plan

1. Meeting the challenge of change - Capabilities Plan | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
A capabilities plan for the Civil Service
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The UK Civil Service’s “Meeting the Challenge of Change: A Capabilities Plan for the Civil Service” sets out its approach to filling “significant gaps in organisational capability and individual’s skills if the Civil Service is to meet today’s and tomorrow’s challenges”. Centred on people and skills, organisational structures and management processes, it identifies 4 priority areas follows: A)Leading and Managing Change  B)Commercial Skills and Behaviours  C)Delivering Successful Projects and Programmes  D)Redesigning Services and Delivering them Digitally. The plan sets out a whole-of-organisation approach to grow capabilities across leadership, corporate (organisational), departmental and individual levels under its 4 priority areas. Additionally, it also outlines a threefold strategy to build, buy and borrow capabilities to address pressing skills gaps. The plan will be refreshed annually based on how it is being delivered. This will allow new future capabilities and requirements to be spotted early. Lastly, a range of quantitative and qualitative data, tracking specific indicators like overall staff engagement, skills, learning and development, diversity, leadership and management of change, workforce planning, recruitment and retention, departmental aggregations of individual competencies as well information on the levels of professional skills will be used to measure the success of the plan. A range of new tools, such as an annual skills review and Departmental Improvement Planning are also being developed to evaluate the progress of the plan and help identify emerging capabilities requirements. An external assessment of how much has been achieved against the plan is to be conducted in 2015.

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Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture

Six Components of a Great Corporate Culture | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
From a vision to your people, the foundation for shaping -- or changing -- your organization.
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Harvard Business Review writes about the 6 key components of an organisation’s culture. Identifying and understanding these 6 components more fully can be the first step to revitalizing or reshaping culture. The 6 components are:
1. Vision - The vision or mission statement is the cornerstone of a great corporate culture. These simple phrases guide a company's values and provide it with purpose which in turn, orients every decision employees make.
2. Values - A company's values form the core of its culture. While a vision articulates a company's purpose, values offer a set of guidelines on the behaviors and mindsets needed to achieve that vision.
3. Practices - Values are of little importance unless they are enshrined in a company's practices.
4. People - No company can build a coherent culture without people who share its core values. It is often as important to recruit the right type of people that can fit into the corporate culture.
5. Narrative - Any organization has a unique history — a unique story. The ability to unearth that history and craft it into a narrative is a core element of culture creation.
6. Place – The design of a place affects culture. For example, open architecture is more conducive to certain office behaviors, like collaboration.

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The_Influence_Model.pdf

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The influence model looks into two laws: the law of reciprocity and law of exchange. The influence law is important in organizations as it enables individuals to get what they want. There are a few elements in this model that should be followed, and failure to adhere can result in failure. The elements involved in influencing others are: assume all are potential allies, clarify your goals and priorities, diagnose the world of the other person, identify relevant currencies between both parties, dealing with relationships and influence through give and take. Throughout the influencing process, it is important to note that trust plays an important part, and individual should make connections early and often, as relationships help improve task exchanges. 

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Creating the Best Workplace on Earth

Creating the Best Workplace on Earth | Structure and Organization | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
PPGS's insight:

In this article, Goffee and Jones have identified the six most essential imperatives for creating an ideal work environment. Their insights come from surveys and interviews of hundreds of executives from all over the world. Few organizations embody all six attributes of the dream organization, many are difficult to achieve, and some even conflict with one another. But they nonetheless stand as an agenda for executives who wish to create the most productive, most rewarding workplace imaginable. Concrete examples of companies such as Arup, LVMH, Waitrose and McDonald’s are used to illustrate the principles identified.

Agenda
1. Let people be themselves.
2. Unleash the flow of information.
3. Magnify people’s strengths.
4. Stand for more than shareholder value.
5. Show how the daily work makes sense.
6. Have rules people can believe in.
Relevance to HDB: Insights gleaned from this HBR study could be useful to HDB’s corporate development and human resource engagement strategies.

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