Strategy and Information Analysis
2.1K views | +0 today
Follow
 
Rescooped by Randy Borum from OSINT Tools and methods
onto Strategy and Information Analysis
Scoop.it!

Hatebase: The Use of Network Analysis Tools to Follow Hate Through Twitter

Hatebase: The Use of Network Analysis Tools to Follow Hate Through Twitter | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
RT @Dan_E_Solo: Open-source intelligence for atrocity monitoring: @SentinelProject on analytic applications of hate-speech data: http://t.co/hi3ioGf9Q7.

Via Jose María Blanco
more...
No comment yet.
Strategy and Information Analysis
A collection of items for strategists and problems-solvers who aim to be well-informed about global affairs and perspectives; capable of developing and evaluating new knowledge; generating and analyzing courses of action; and who are interested in expressing clearly reasoned opinions and communicating effectively in writing, oral presentation, and visual display.
Curated by Randy Borum
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

UNESCO Launches Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL) — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

UNESCO Launches Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL) — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
This week UNESCO launched a framework illustrating its Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL).
This global strategy marries the large, but often separated, disciplines of information literacy and media literacy and creates a common vocabulary for folks in multiple areas of knowledge to engage in conversation. It also positions these critical literacies as a combined set of competencies–knowledge, skills and attitudes–central for living and working in our world today.

Via John Evans
more...
Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, February 22, 6:18 AM
UNESCO has launched a framework illustrating its Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL).
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 27, 2:01 AM
Information Literacy est la future base du savoir.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 27, 5:52 AM
Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL)
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Teacher Engagement for Learning
Scoop.it!

8 of The Best Concept Mapping Apps for Teachers

8 of The Best Concept Mapping Apps for Teachers | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

Via Grant Montgomery
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

How to lead a brainstorm - TED.Ed

How to lead a brainstorm - TED.Ed | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Brainstorming was invented in the 1930s as a practical idea-generation technique for regular use by “creatives” within the ad agency BBDO. The skill began to gain a wider audience in 1942, when Alex Osborn — the “O” in BBDO — released a book called How to Think Up and sparked the imaginations of his fellow Mad Men.

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Google Image Search Tips via Educators' Technology

Google Image Search Tips via Educators' Technology | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , John Evans
more...
David W. Deeds's curator insight, March 19, 9:20 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to Filomena Gomes.

Scooped by Randy Borum
Scoop.it!

The Cognitive Bias Podcast by David Dylan Thomas on iTunes

The Cognitive Bias Podcast by David Dylan Thomas on iTunes | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Download past episodes or subscribe to future episodes of The Cognitive Bias Podcast by David Dylan Thomas for free.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

Thinking in Scenarios Improves Forecasts

Thinking in Scenarios Improves Forecasts | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

In my recent paper published in the Journal of Financial Economics, Can analysts assess fundamental risk and valuation uncertainty? An empirical analysis of scenario-based value estimates, my co-authors and I find that there is a better way to present a fuller picture of future possibilities by putting multiple scenarios on the table, instead of limiting predictions to a single-point outcome.  We used the setting of equity research to demonstrate this. We find that scenario-based forecasting helps analysts improve the overall risk picture surrounding the firms in their coverage as well as enhancing their forecast accuracy and reducing their optimistic biases.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

The HUMINT Side of Competitive Intelligence

The HUMINT Side of Competitive Intelligence | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
The acquisition of the information in the realm of competitive intelligence is often acquired from publicly available resources. Often, many individuals believe that competitive intelligence is collected solely from journals, articles, employment notices, internet pages, and other written publications which may provide data points for analysis. What many fail to realize, is that although collection from written publications may occur, this collection may only equal 10%-20% of the information which exists. The other 80%-90% is acquired through spoken communication. From interviews, lectures, webinars, and even conversations at the local coffee shop. Yes, the local coffee shop near the company headquarters is a prime collection opportunity for the HUMINT Competitive Intelligence collector. Whether the information is derived from written publication or HUMINT collection, the data points or information acquired is only one piece of the larger puzzle.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

10 Tips on How to Research Your Competition

10 Tips on How to Research Your Competition | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Keeping tabs on your competition is a great strategy for growing your business. Follow these tips, from fellow small business owners, on which tools are best and how to get started.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

15 data and analytics trends that will dominate 2017

15 data and analytics trends that will dominate 2017 | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

Along with social, mobile and cloud, analytics and associated data technologies have earned a place as one of the core disruptors of the digital age. 2016 saw big data technologies increasingly leveraged to power business intelligence. Here's what 2017 holds in store for the data and analytics space. John Schroeder, executive chairman and founder of MapR Technologies, predicts the following six trends will dominate data and analytics in 2017:


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever @ajjuliani

21st Century Skills Have Always Been “Needed” Skills, But Now We Need Them More Than Ever @ajjuliani | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

"Seth Godin recently wrote an article, “Let’s Stop Calling Them Soft Skills“, in which he describes five categories of skills that we all look for in colleagues, employees, and students–yet, don’t seem to value over other content and standardized skills. What I love about Seth’s view is that it is one outside of education. He has created businesses, written books, designed products, and even started his own aMBA school. 


Seth believes these so-called “soft skills” are more important now than ever before.These skills shared above are important. They’ve always been important. However, maybe now more than ever before. In a world that is quickly changing, we need to continue refocus our why on giving students the skills and knowledge to actively learn and pursue their interests, passions, and dreams.


Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Randy Borum
Scoop.it!

What is malware?

What is malware? | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Malware is a portmanteau word meaning malicious software. The term was first coined in 1990 by security researcher Yisrael Radai. However, malware has existed since the 1970s.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

15 Tools For Competitor Analysis

15 Tools For Competitor Analysis | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
This post contains 15 tools for competitor analysis, which help you learn more about your competitors and do better competitive analysis.
Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Randy Borum
Scoop.it!

12 Cognitive Biases Explained - How to Think Better and More Logically Removing Bias

We are going to be explaining 12 cognitive biases in this video and presenting them in a format that you can easily understand to help you make bette
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

Courses • Competia competitive Intelligence

This course's objective is to provide to managers and executives with toolkits that allow them to not only be more efficient when doing online research, but also to identify sources of information that answer their information needs. Learn about the techniques and sources which are part of the "Invisible Web":information that is not yet indexed by search engines (about 70% of the total information about people, technologies and companies), and about the informal web: tracking customer perception, competitors' employees in informal and social networks. Particular emphasis is put on methods to find information about private companies (their alliance partners, marketing strategies, client lists, distribution networks, financial status, management bios, etc...). This course is fully interactive: each participant has access to a computer to practice techniques and test sources of information as the course unfolds.June/October 2017


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from OSINT Tools and methods
Scoop.it!

9 Rules for Using Open Source Intelligence in Investigations | i-Sight

9 Rules for Using Open Source Intelligence in Investigations | i-Sight | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
OSINT tools can transform your investigation research when you know where and how to look, but beware of the dangers of relying on the internet.

Via Jose María Blanco
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

"Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?"


Via Chris Carter, John Evans
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, March 14, 8:05 AM
Here are 5 team building games to try out with your students that also develop critical thinking skills. Collaboration and team spirit await you!

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Gamification

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Gaming

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Critical-Thinking

 

 

Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 14, 8:21 AM
Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, March 18, 12:10 AM
Critical thinking is the most important skill to develop, since in these times of information at hand, we cannot believe everything we see, read, and hear, and that is why it is important to develop this ability as it allows us to be alert and question everything that comes from these means of information. Is a skill that moves a student from concrete ideas to abstract and inferred concepts. Critical thinking allows us to analyze outcomes, compare ideas, identify parallels, sequence events, synthesize information and draw conclusions from a given body of knowledge. Whether it is the proof behind a mathematics formula or an implied tone in an essay, critical thinking skills enable students to solve problems in the real world and on exams in school. Meghan Moll (2014) suggests five tools to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for success on every high school or college test and assignment. 1. Brain games: Recently, websites dedicated to training your brain have enjoyed increased popularity. Lumosity, for example, provides games that aid in improving memory and problem-solving. From timed matching games to order sequence memorization, websites like this can aid in cognition and the ability to ask, "What is the next step?" This skill is critical to learning how to approach complex problems on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT. Rather than playing time-wasting games when you have a lull in your day, search online for brain teasers and peruse the plethora of brain games at your fingertips. 2. Logic puzzles: Before the Internet, puzzles intended to exercise your brain were published in books. Collections of crossword puzzles, logic problems, riddles, sudoku, word problems and word searches can be found at your local bookstore or library. The puzzles in these books are a wonderful strategy to activate different parts of your brain for a round or two of mental gymnastics, and many collections even discuss what each puzzle is meant to target within the mind. 3. Board games: This suggestion may seem strange at first, but do not balk. Choose board games that require more than luck – namely, strategy – for players to win. Any game where players must carefully consider their next move, recognize patterns and remember details will aid in honing critical thinking skills. Certain games like Rubik’s Cube are single-player, while others involve multiple people. Checkers, chess and Mastermind are two-player games that challenge you to plan several steps ahead. Games like Boggle and Scrabble require analyzing information quickly and formulating words, while Clue and Risk test and strengthen your ability to anticipate and react to others’ moves, as well as infer motives. 4. Journaling: Daily reflection – such as maintaining a journal – is a simple way to revisit your day, but it is also a fantastic opportunity to explore ideas. Writing encourages you to expand upon your thoughts and form connections. A journal forces you to slow down and focus on just one or two ideas at a time, which hectic schedules don't otherwise allow. Use your journal to record important ideas and questions and narratives about your life. 5. Book clubs: Students who read for understanding find it far easier to think critically than those who rush to finish. Analyzing a book requires you to delve deeper and ponder complex questions. When reading, think about why the book was written the way it was, what motivates certain characters, and how plot developments may be symbols of foreshadowing. Locate a book club to hone these skills. You will read works you otherwise may not have, and you will learn to examine character development, plot, symbolism and a whole host of other features.
3
Scooped by Randy Borum
Scoop.it!

Hyperpartisan Facebook Pages Are Publishing False And Misleading Information At An Alarming Rate

Hyperpartisan Facebook Pages Are Publishing False And Misleading Information At An Alarming Rate | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
A BuzzFeed News analysis found that three big right-wing Facebook pages published false or misleading information 38% of the tim
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Randy Borum
Scoop.it!

The State of Information Visualization, 2017

The State of Information Visualization, 2017 | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
The Data Science Roundup - Robert Kosara writes a brilliant post every year on the advances in data visualization over the prior year. This year's post focuse
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

You Don’t Need Big Data — You Need the Right Data

But the reality is that our relentless focus on the importance of big data is often misleading. Yes, in some situations, deriving value from data requires having an immense amount of that data. But the key for innovators across industries is that the size of the data isn’t the most critical factor — having the right data is.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

How to Conduct Competitive Research

How to Conduct Competitive Research | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Understanding the competition is a crucial business activity for any entrepreneur or business executive. Some companies hire professionals to track competitors and assess the competitive landscape on a regular basis. But it doesn't always have to be a complicated, time-consuming, and expensive process -- particularly given the new wealth of data that can be assembled using the Internet. By investing even a small amount of time, businesses of any size can develop a framework for making competitive assessments, gather intelligence on business rivals, and understand how to position their own brand, products, and company in the marketplace. Not only can you learn best practices from competitors, but you can also learn to avoid the mistakes they make.

Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

20 Competitor Analysis Tools, Tips, and Guides to Up Your Game

20 Competitor Analysis Tools, Tips, and Guides to Up Your Game | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

It’s not necessarily that this is an insanely hard job. But there’s so much that you could possibly do and measure and look at, that just jumping in on a whim will definitely lead to overwhelm.   You need a plan. That includes knowing what you’re looking at and why, and having a process for monitoring and analyzing their content. That way you know your focus and won’t get distracted by all those other things you could look at. Here are some of my favorite resources and tools for getting the job done:


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
Darren Lee Revell's curator insight, February 17, 3:48 AM

Want to know what tools SEO's use?

Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

Webcast: Social Media Intelligence - 10 Essential Hacks for CI/MI Professionals

Webcast: Social Media Intelligence - 10 Essential Hacks for CI/MI Professionals | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

The truth is: Social media platforms are simply not designed to find that information easily. They are designed to collect behavioural data of their users; true. They are designed to sell advertising; true. But even searching for your own posts can become a nightmare.  So is searching for competitor/market information worth the effort?  “True”, says Amir Fleischman, “you only need to know some essential tools and techniques. Sometimes it is even more like hacking existing functions by using them differently as they are supposed to be used.”


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Randy Borum
Scoop.it!

Indicators of Compromise and where to find them

Indicators of Compromise and where to find them | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Cisco Blog > Security Indicators of Compromise ('IOC') are used to suggest a system has been affected by some form of malware. An Indicator of Compromise can be anything from a file name to the behavior observed while malware is actively running on an infected system.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Tools for Teachers & Learners
Scoop.it!

instaGrok.com - Study search engine

instaGrok.com - Study search engine | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it
Interactive visual interface allows the user to quickly grasp important concepts, key facts and relationships.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, February 7, 1:09 PM

Fantastic - Shows search results as a concept map.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, February 8, 10:47 AM
This seems interesting but I couldn't check it out without paying for a class subscription!
 
Rescooped by Randy Borum from Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
Scoop.it!

Did your boss make a stupid decision, or do you lack data?

Did your boss make a stupid decision, or do you lack data? | Strategy and Information Analysis | Scoop.it

Of course, sometimes your instinct is right and it really is a bad decision, one that ignores inconvenient facts or expert advice in favor of the decision-maker’s internal beliefs. Some leaders believe themselves infallible, and some people won’t accept that they can’t get what they want until every possible approach — including the ridiculous — has failed. But a lot of decisions that might seem downright crazy to you make more sense than you suspect. Most of the time, when you don’t understand why a decision was made, it means that you don’t really understand the decision-maker’s goals or overall mandate. If you take a step back, you might be able to make sense of the situation.


Via Bonnie Hohhof
more...