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Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof
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Competitive intelligence and strategic surprises: Why monitoring weak signals is not the right approach

The difficulty of anticipating strategic surprises is often ascribed to a ‘signal-to-noise’ problem, i.e. to the inability to pick up so-called ‘weak signals’ that foretell such surprises. In fact, monitoring of weak signals has become a staple of competitive intelligence. This is all the more so since the development of information technology that allows the accumulation and quasi-automatic processing of massive amount of data. The idea is that the identification of weak signals will enable an organization to detect a problem (or an opportunity) early and, hence, to react more quickly and more appropriately.
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Assessing business intelligence systems in a pharmaceutical company

The concepts of business intelligence and competitive intelligence (CI) have been used without distinction in the previous literature, although some authors highlight the differences between the two terms. Cavalcanti (2005) indicates that BI covers a wider spectrum than competitive intelligence. Whereas CI focuses mainly on the microenvironment, BI includes both the microenvironment and the macroenvironment. The following concepts are related to the construct of BI: competitive intelligence, customer intelligence, competitor intelligence, strategic intelligence and technical intelligence. In American literature, the concept of CI is often used and is emphasized within the contexts of environment and external information, whereas in European literature, the term BI is considered a wider concept that covers IC and the other constructs associated with intelligence as mentioned above. (academic)

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Cultural regions of Canada and United States: implications for management research

We consider why international business research comparing values, attitudes, and behaviors of managers from the United States and Canada shows conflicting results about cultural differences and similarities between these two nations. We argue that one reason behind these inconsistent findings is the presence of intranational subcultural regions in these nations. The second reason is that the variable(s) under scrutiny influence the generalizability of research findings. Employing Lenartowicz and Roth’s (1999) framework for culture assessment, theories of cultural evolution and maintenance, and data from the World Values Survey, we test the distinctiveness of subcultural regions in the United States and Canada, at both the individual level and the regional level of analysis. Results support our hypothesized arguments. (academic)

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What’s Lost When Experts Retire

What’s Lost When Experts Retire | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
But in dozens of recent interviews with CTOs, CIOs, and top HR managers in preparation for writing our new book Critical Knowledge Transfer, we found that managers often don’t know what they have lost until after the expert leaves — and by then, it may be difficult to recover. In after-the-fact stories, we heard about critical losses in four areas in particular: relationships, reputation, re-work and regeneration. And the price tag associated with such losses were estimated to be as much as 20 times the more visible, tangible costs of recruitment and training.
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How to develop Your Strategic Thinking

How to develop Your Strategic Thinking | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
The benefits of strategic thinking are clear – competitive advantage. But where do you start? If you are unsure, you’re not alone. For most of us, our first reaction is to deal with what’s directly in front of us. Why? Perhaps because it always seems more urgent and tangible. If we can see it, we can deal with it. Unfortunately, while you concentrate on overcoming obstacles, you could miss some big opportunities, not to mention the signs that indicate the direction you are going it taking you off track.
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White Tea Wholesale's comment, December 6, 2014 6:09 AM
Very Nice post..If we want to true our dream then we have to make a big plan and a great strategi.
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What the Two Most Innovation-Friendly States Have in Common

What the Two Most Innovation-Friendly States Have in Common | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

The obvious takeaway for managers was that a firm should locate within its relevant industrial district to enjoy these benefits. At the same time, many municipalities have poured billions of dollars into trying to create industrial clusters in order to trigger the higher wages and faster growth they stimulate. Some go so far as to adopt the silicon moniker for their initiatives (despite having no semiconductor activity): Silicon Prairie in Illinois and Silicon Alley in Manhattan. The trouble is that firms don’t seem to benefit much from relocating to clusters and attempts by regions to create them somehow never pay off. So what’s wrong with the theory? The answer to that question was uncovered in a series of industry case studies by the late Steven Klepper, who demonstrated that what looks like spillover effects freely available to all firms is actually spawning.

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The tools of smart transformation -- EY

The tools of smart transformation -- EY | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Managing and promoting change within an organization is never easy, so what are the common threads that tie together a successful transformation project?
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Race with Rudolph and skydive with Santa in the countdown to December 24 -- Google Santa Tracker

Race with Rudolph and skydive with Santa in the countdown to December 24 -- Google Santa Tracker | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
December may mean snow days in Denver, Colo. or beach days in Sydney, Australia, but in Santa’s Village, it means the countdown to Santa’s big night. Starting today, the elves are back on the clock in the North Pole—and throughout the month of December, you can join the elves as they unlock a new project or game each day in preparation for Santa’s annual journey around the world.
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Culture Can Make or Break Strategy -- INSEAD

Culture Can Make or Break Strategy -- INSEAD | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Culture is an aggregation of the mindset and beliefs of an organisation’s employees. The manifestation of the principles, vision and mission that bind its people together. In today’s business world, where acquisitions, mergers, diversifications, expansions and sell-offs are becoming more and more common, understanding organisational culture in strategic decision-making is becoming critically important.
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Patricia laronze's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:20 AM

"A company however big or small, cannot successfully implement corporate strategy without employees who believe in the mission"

Ana Vellozo Luz's curator insight, December 8, 2014 4:26 PM

critically important.

Anjan Purandare's curator insight, January 5, 1:46 PM

"Culture assessment is as much about understanding the standalone needs and inherent nuances of each team individual, as it is about pre-empting the resultant sum-of-parts of the various individuals who come together on the team," says Anjan Purandare, CEO, Ivyclique.

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CFO Insights - The value shift: Why CFOs should lead the charge in the digital age

CFO Insights - The value shift: Why CFOs should lead the charge in the digital age | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Research by OpenMatters with input from Deloitte & Touche LLP, examining 40 years of data from the Standard & Poor’s 500, finds that investors assign higher valuations to organizations that embrace emerging technologies to create digital networks. This change is part of a broader trend of corporate value shifts from the predominance of tangible assets, including plant, property, equipment and financial assets, to value from intangible assets. In this issue of CFO Insights, as digital technologies increasingly disrupt age-old sources of value, we look at how CFOs can tap into this value shift through business model innovation.

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Decision Insights: Using predictive analytics to clone your best decision makers - Bain Brief

Decision Insights: Using predictive analytics to clone your best decision makers - Bain Brief | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
In the middle of the spectrum, however, lies a vast and largely unexplored territory. These decisions—both relatively frequent and individually important, requiring the exercise of judgment and the application of experience—represent a potential gold mine for the companies that get there first with advanced analytics.
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GPS as We Know It Happened Because of Ronald Reagan

GPS as We Know It Happened Because of Ronald Reagan | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Korean Air Lines Flight 007 left Anchorage, Alaska, on Aug. 30, 1983, with 269 people on board, strayed into Soviet airspace on its way to Seoul, and was shot down by Russian forces. Part of Ronald Reagan’s response was to allow civilian use of GPS, developed by the U.S. military in the 1970s as a Cold War weapon, to help planes avoid hostile airspace. Private businesses and scientists quickly realized that GPS receivers could help surveying and other industries, too.
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Strategic Forecasting: The Impersonal Dimension of Intelligence

Strategic Forecasting: The Impersonal Dimension of Intelligence | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Strategic forecasting is that class of intelligence that is most alien to intelligence services—events that cannot be understood through sources, and whose outcome was unintended and unanticipated by the actors involved. In addition, it does not allow decision makers to decide whether the events will happen, but confines them to preparing for broad shifts. For most political leaders, immediate issues subject to control are more attractive, while strategic issues, which after all may be in error, require enormous effort with political costs. Careers are not enhanced in intelligence by broad and long-term thinking even if completely correct.
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How human source collection operations are a reflection of culture in US and China

This article examines HUMINT (Human Source Collection) operations as a reflection of cultural  practices in China and the U.S. As such it begins by describing the role of context within daily life in China and then provides theoretical explanation for this Chinese context emphasis by clarifying the U.S. as more of a low-context culture and China as being more of a high-context culture. This is then used as foundation to compare and contrast Chinese and US practices. (academic)

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On-Going Debate: “Where” Should Competitive Intelligence Reside? | LinkedIn

On-Going Debate: “Where” Should Competitive Intelligence Reside? | LinkedIn | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
The debate “where” the competitive intelligence (CI) function should be housed within a company is one that has been on-going over the past 20 years. Some are insistent that a CI program needs to be a function of product marketing with the goal of influencing product messaging and arming sales with the latest sell-against intelligence. Others believe that CI should be a function of product management helping to drive competitive product differentiation through unique features and functionality that rivals do not yet support.
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The quick and the dead: new data visualizations

The quick and the dead: new data visualizations | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Static charts still have their purposes. They freeze time and concentrate the mind. Indeed, there are surely stories for which only a static chart will do. But in the past they were produced because there were no alternatives. Today the default is shifting whereby dynamic charts will become the standard format, and data-visualisation editors will have to deliberately choose to depict data in a static format. The stationary chart will be a preference not a limitation.
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How to Make Innovations Business Relevant | Innovation Management

How to Make Innovations Business Relevant | Innovation Management | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Innovations should clearly contribute to growth, optimization and protection of the business. However, CEOs often challenge innovations already at the beginning of respective discussions and huge amounts of ideas get lost, together with prospective business benefits. In this IM Channel One Roundtable Discussion we introduced EY’s way of utilizing innovation management to address the three most relevant board room challenges: top-line growth, bottom-line growth and business resilience. (webinar)

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6 Leadership Development Trends for 2015

6 Leadership Development Trends for 2015 | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Deloitte recently released a new research study that demonstrates a surprising gap between what’s being said and what’s being done by business executives – a problem that derives mostly from the lack of focus in leadership development. Still, during the last few years leadership development programs have received their fair share of criticism – this piece from CLO Media examines each and every problem attributed to this kind of skill training. Even though in the last decade companies would allocate more funds than ever to train their executives, a 2012 poll by the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard University showed that as many as 70% of Americans blame leadership crisis as a factor in the national economic decline. Considered against this puzzling situation – where the demand for leadership skills is on the rise and leadership development programs often fail to deliver their promised results – what is the future of leadership development?

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When Public Data = Big Data - 3 Tips for Competitive Intelligence Teams

Why “public” data isn’t the same as “Internet data.”
How the Internet is like big data with a nice UI
How you can get quant from the Internet and aggregate it in an almost “big data,” powerful way. (podcast)

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Building a Valued CI Program: InfoDesk Third Competitive Intelligence Webinar Dec 16

Building a Valued CI Program: InfoDesk Third Competitive Intelligence Webinar Dec 16 | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Building a Valued CI Program: Understanding the Characteristics of an Effective Intelligence Capability,” the third webinar in InfoDesk’s complimentary three-part series on competitive intelligence (CI), will be held Tuesday, December 16, at 11 a.m. EST. During the webinar, David Kalinowski, co-founder and President of Proactive Worldwide, Inc., will examine the importance and benefits of demonstrating value of any CI program. He will also discuss determining performance metrics that resonate within your organization
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How to Trace Federal Regulations – A Research Guide | Law Librarians of Congress

How to Trace Federal Regulations – A Research Guide | Law Librarians of Congress | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Our patrons at the Law Library of Congress frequently ask us for assistance in investigating the origins and statutory authority of federal rules and regulations. And no wonder–regulations are important to understand, because they have the force and effect of law just as federal statutes do, though they are not issued by Congress. Instead, rules and regulations are created by a federal body such as an agency, board, or commission, and explain how that body intends to carry out or administer a federal law. In fact, these rules and regulations can often affect our everyday lives even more directly than statutes, by laying out the details of how we go about following the laws passed by Congress. This Research Guide will address the basics of how to “trace” a federal regulation, in order to not only derive its statutory authority, but also to learn more about its origins and history.
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Getting Your Team Members on the Same Page -- INSEAD

Getting Your Team Members on the Same Page -- INSEAD | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
This scenario is more commonplace than executives care to admit in today’s workplace. And yet, it is increasingly inevitable as we put teams in place that: a) are dispersed (crossing distance, time zones, languages, and/or cultures), b) include members shared across multiple teams or projects, and c) are dynamic – with members frequently added and dropped piecemeal based on when their particular expertise is necessary. These three trends are increasingly resulting in teams with misaligned perceptions about who’s in the team and who isn’t.
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New change, new roles, new C-suite? EY

New change, new roles, new C-suite? EY | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
The immediacy of the digital world demands a different approach, and part of this change entails exploring new leadership models. The article examines, in detail, the emergence of the chief information officer (CIO), chief commercial officer (CCO) and chief risk officer (CRO). Here are extracts from the article about the first two of these three roles.
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Automation, jobs, and the future of work | McKinsey & Company

Automation, jobs, and the future of work | McKinsey & Company | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

The topic of job displacement has, throughout US history, ignited frustration over technological advances and their tendency to make traditional jobs obsolete; artisans protested textile mills in the early 19th century, for example. In recent years, start-ups and the high-tech industry have become the focus of this discussion. A recent Pew Research Center study found that technology experts are almost evenly split on whether robots and artificial intelligence will displace a significant number of jobs over the next decade, so there is plenty of room for debate. What follows is an edited transcript plus video clips of a conversation on this topic, moderated by McKinsey Global Institute partner Michael Chui and MGI director James Manyika

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4 Types of Managers Who Make It

4 Types of Managers Who Make It | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Yes, team work is important, hard work is important, doing your job is important, blah blah. In corporate, as in everything else, being recognized requires doing something differently. It may not always be rewarded quickly, but the alternative is an anonymous face in the crowd. In the competitive intelligence community, these anonymous information fetchers imitate via “best practices” benchmarking and coordinate vendors without actually adding much value. In the larger managerial community, these are the so called “valuable” team members who do a “good – but not outstanding - job”. They have neither desire nor ambition to stand out. To their top management, therefore, they are easily replaceable and eventually redundant.
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