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The Human Algorithm: Redefining the Value of Data

The Human Algorithm: Redefining the Value of Data | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

The onslaught of real-time social, local, mobile (SoLoMo) technology is nothing short of overwhelming. Besides the gadgets, apps, social networks and appliances that continue to emerge, the pace of innovation is only outdone by the volumes of data that each produce

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listed as a disruptive trend

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Pedro Barbosa's curator insight, December 14, 2012 3:57 AM

SoLOMO and INfluence are clearly some of the trends for 2013 - 2015.

Augmented Reality and Gamification did start already.

 

Attention to Syndicated Commerce. 

 

Pedro Barbosa - www.pbarbosa.com | www.harvardtrends.com

Fred Zimny's curator insight, December 14, 2012 12:54 PM

I am not sure about local. But the effects of SoMo are indeed overwhelmng

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More Companies Are Cashing In on Underused Resources

More Companies Are Cashing In on Underused Resources | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

“LiquidSpace, which has been called the ‘Airbnb of work spaces,’ has brought collaborative consumption to the world of office space,” write Kurt Matzler, Viktoria Veider and Wolfgang Kathan, all of University of Innsbruck in their article “Adapting to the Sharing Economy,” in the Winter 2015 issue of MIT Sloan Management Review. But the idea of sharing unused resources and capacities extends further, to companies that aren’t totally built around the collaborative model. Indeed, the authors write, the opportunity to profit from the sharing economy “is an especially promising strategy when particular assets cannot be acquired by everyone due to the large amount of capital associated with owning them.”

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3 ways the BRICS can improve education

3 ways the BRICS can improve education | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

This week, the World Bank warned of a structural slowdown as developing nations cede their leading role in global growth to the developed world. Growth in emerging economies fell to just 3.5% during the first quarter of 2015. If the contribution of China is stripped out of this figure, then the average GDP growth of emerging economies is close to 0% in 2015. The process of emerging economies getting richer ‒ much of which was driven by export-led manufacturing ‒ has become more complex, as these economies are now turning away from manufacturing. The fall in overall global trade growth also means that there is less chance that developing countries other than China can export their way to prosperity. An important reason for this weakness is that few of these countries have invested in the more complex challenges of promoting a learning environment that celebrates creativity, curiosity and risk; changing an exam- and rote-based education system that shapes its youth; or designing regulations that develop high value-added service sectors.

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What stands in the way of decision-making

People make poor decisions when under severe schedule and time pressure, when they take "convenient" shortcuts or when they don't have access to all the important information they need to make reasoned decisions. These challenges can be overcome with proper planning and disciplined research. In a perfect world, our decision-making process would be: we determine what we want to achieve and why; next, we look at our "doable" options and decide which one will be most effective; then, we choose the best option. Sounds easy, right? Unfortunately, this is not always the case.

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Study Offers New Evidence That Google Skews Search Results

Study Offers New Evidence That Google Skews Search Results | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Evidence continues to mount that when it comes to search results, Google isn’t always playing fair. The latest accusation comes from a new study written by Harvard Business School professor Michael Luca, Columbia Law School Professor Tim Wu, and Yelp’s data science team. In it, the researchers claim that Google is skewing its local search results in favor of Google-created content. That suggestion shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone who’s been paying attention.

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Consumer product trends: Navigating 2020 - Deloitte

Consumer product trends: Navigating 2020 - Deloitte | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Consumer product companies and retailers face a confluence of rapidly evolving technologies, consumer demographic shifts, changing consumer preferences, and economic uncertainty. These dynamics have the potential to undermine not only historical sources of profitable growth but also historical sources of competitive advantage, and render traditional operating models obsolete. In this rapidly evolving, low-growth, and margin-compressed environment, clear strategic direction and coordinated efforts are not all that should be pursued. Speed of execution and completeness of action are just as important, if not more important, to consider.
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How Less Disclosure Affects Perceptions of Risk Knowledge@Wharton

How Less Disclosure Affects Perceptions of Risk Knowledge@Wharton | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

When the JOBS (Jumpstart Our Business Startups) Act became law in 2012, one provision allowed firms to reduce the amount of information that they provide to investors before an IPO. This was meant to make it easier for smaller firms to get outside investors. Research co-authored by Wharton accounting professor Daniel Taylor finds that those shortcuts have had some unintended — and costly — consequences.

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What’s Fueling African Growth? Knowledge@Wharton

What’s Fueling African Growth? Knowledge@Wharton | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
On June 19, French-born economist and investment banker Lionel Zinsou was appointed prime minister of Benin. In his new role, Zinsou will oversee economic development of the West African nation. In 2013, Knowledge@Wharton partner ParisTech Review interviewed Zinsou about the vigorous growth seen recently in many African economies — where does it come from? And what do African nations need to do to compete with other emerging markets? The interview appears below:
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Four Strategies for Responding to Sustainability-Oriented Competitors

Four Strategies for Responding to Sustainability-Oriented Competitors | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

For established companies that were not necessarily built with sustainability in mind, these new entrants are competing for their most attractive customers and talent. Customers that prefer sustainability-oriented products and services tend to be young and relatively wealthy. Talented employees who have a choice of where to work, particularly millennials, increasingly want to use their skills at companies that they perceive to be doing good in the world. A continued generational shift toward sustainability-oriented values threatens to shift the balance even further in favour of companies that have sustainability baked into their DNA. Although these hybrid social ventures are still relatively small in many industries, forward-thinking executives have begun to take notice and create plans for responding to them.

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The Internet Of (Some) Things

The Internet Of (Some) Things | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Internet of Things (IoT) initiatives are currently underway within their organizations. That said, there’s still one question many companies have failed to answer — is more data always a good thing? Unfortunately, countless organizations may never strike that mother lode of data-driven insights that could potentially transform their businesses. Companies could be flooded by terabytes of data from sensors embedded in everything from assembly lines, to delivery trucks, to postage meters in the mail room. And not just from their own assets – but from their partners, from the surrounding environments, and even from the “digital exhaust” of customers, prospects, and employees with increasingly quantified behaviors and preferences. With this massive influx of data many companies will have no idea what hit them. Strategies should focus on bounded scenarios – where a small collection of intelligent or connected devices can solve old problems in news ways or solve brand-new problems only approachable given the rise of the IoT. The solution lies not in the internet of everything, but rather the internet of some things,

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Global IPO patterns changing as activity moves to private markets and to Asia -- EY

Global IPO patterns changing as activity moves to private markets and to Asia -- EY | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Global IPO activity in the second quarter of 2015 picked up compared to the first three months of the year, up 61% by proceeds and 37% by deal number, but the IPO market in 2015 so far has been lacklustre, especially in the US and Europe. By the end of the first half of 2015, deal numbers had reached 631 IPOs, a 6% increase on the same period last year. However, at US$103.7b, total capital raised was 13% lower than during the first half of 2014, according to the quarterly EY Global IPO Trends: 2015 Q2. A number of factors underpin this subdued activity

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Manufacturing’s next act | McKinsey & Company

Manufacturing’s next act | McKinsey & Company | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Mention “Industry 4.0” to most manufacturing executives and you will raise eyebrows. If they’ve heard of it, they are likely confused about what it is. If they haven’t heard of it, they’re likely to be skeptical of what they see as yet another piece of marketing hype, an empty catchphrase. And yet a closer look at what’s behind Industry 4.0 reveals some powerful emerging currents with strong potential to change the way factories work. It may be too much to say that it is another industrial revolution. But call it whatever you like; the fact is, Industry 4.0 is gathering force, and executives should carefully monitor the coming changes and develop strategies to take advantage of the new opportunities.
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Economic Conditions Snapshot, June 2015: McKinsey Global Survey results

Economic Conditions Snapshot, June 2015: McKinsey Global Survey results | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Executives in emerging markets have grown less optimistic about the state of their home economies than they were in 2014 and have been more downbeat overall this year than their developed-market peers, according to McKinsey’s latest global economic survey.1 In a snapshot of disjointed sentiments from region to region, optimism among executives in developed Asia and North America has faded over the past three months, those in India remain the most bullish, and respondents in Latin America continue to be the most downbeat about domestic economic conditions.
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Mismatches Work - competitive intelligence distribution of effort

Mismatches Work - competitive intelligence distribution of effort | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Past research indicates that CI professionals spend excessive effort (both time and money) on data collection. What is excessive? Well, our experience, and that of others, indicates that the optimal distribution of effort (whether measured in terms of time, dollars, or any combination) among the 4 classic stages of CI activity is approximately as follows: Establish Needs – 20%;  Collect Data – 30%; Analyze Data – 40%: and Disseminate CI – 10%. What about when two people are dividing up the work of CI? Again, based on our experience, we have found that the skills most useful in Establishing Needs tend to be those most useful in Analysis of Data as well. Conversely, the skills most useful in Data Collection tend to be similar to those needed for Dissemination. All of this leads to a potential guideline for building a CI team

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New Wikipedia Articles Of Interest To Intelligence Professionals

New Wikipedia Articles Of Interest To Intelligence Professionals | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

Despite its occasional weaknesses, I really like Wikipedia.  So, instead of traditional writing assignments in some of my classes, I like to task students to write Wikipedia articles about intelligence issues that have not already been covered.  Here are a handful of articles recently produced by students in my Collection Operations for Intelligence Analysts class.  The mix is eclectic because I let the students pick their own topics but is, perhaps, more interesting as a result. 

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How Europe’s population has changed since 2001

How Europe’s population has changed since 2001 | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it


With migration at the top of the regional agenda across Europe, a new map highlights the dramatic shifts in population the continent experienced during the first decade of the 21st century. The map was created by Germany’s BBSR – the Federal Institute for Research on Building, Urban Affairs and Spatial Development – and shows the average annual change in population of every European municipality between 2001 and 2011 (the latest year for which data is available). Blue areas show population falls while red areas show increases, and the darker the colour the bigger the change. Yellow areas experienced little or no change.

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How Not to Be Misled by Data

How Not to Be Misled by Data | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

A number has a way of ending an argument. What can you say to it? There’s no nuance, no room for interpretation—it is what it is. Unfortunately, numbers turn out to be a lot like words: powerful and illuminating but capable of being deployed to bad ends. Here’s a little manual of some of the most common ways that data, for all its precision, can take you down a wrong path: Failure to compare. Unrepresentative representative. Needle in the haystack. More is more

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Onslaught of the smart machines: How companies can make the most of cognitive technologies - Delolitte

Onslaught of the smart machines: How companies can make the most of cognitive technologies - Delolitte | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

If you believe, as I do, that cognitive technologies—those systems that can perform typical knowledge-oriented tasks like digesting and understanding text, answering questions in human languages, and making informed decisions—will soon be coming in force to many different organizations, what should be done about it now? There are at least three different levels on which action is needed.

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(podcast) The last-mile problem: How data science and behavioral science can work together

(podcast) The last-mile problem: How data science and behavioral science can work together | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
It’s a very simple idea. Predictive models help us combine information in a better, more principled way than unaided judgment. And behavioral economics, in these cases where the ultimate goal is behavior change, helps us go from the model implication to the improved behaviors."
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Why do big health insurance companies want to merge? Knowledge@Wharton

Why do big health insurance companies want to merge? Knowledge@Wharton | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

As the nation’s top five health insurance companies jockey through merger proposals that could leave just three large companies at the top, a big question is, what does it mean for consumers – and the rest of the industry? Those insured by large organizations with strong negotiating power can expect little if any change in premiums, says Mark Pauly, a Wharton professor of health care management. But individuals and small businesses would likely see health insurance premiums tick up. And while would-be merger partners often project greater efficiency and lower costs as a goal, it rarely turns out that way, Pauly adds. He offers additional views on the effects of the proposed mergers in this Knowledge@Wharton interview.

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New Tools Needed for Managing Uncertainty

New Tools Needed for Managing Uncertainty | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
Traditional risk management frameworks have failed to prevent major environmental, social and governance disasters. New ideas are needed from outside corporations. Collaboration between the financial sector and academics could help. For example, a leading investment bank has recently started to use a more structured approach to risk forecast. Facilitated by a deep interaction between the developing team and academia, the systematic scenario analysis requires that analysts not only issue a point forecast but also a range of possible outcomes. This is not the first time that such a collaboration would be fruitful. Index funds were the brainchild of the academic research in the sixties and seventies that have developed the notion of efficient markets. Behavioural finance became mainstream decades after it was first investigated in academic seminars. So what might these new tools look like? A few trends are emerging.
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How Firms Change Bad Practices

How Firms Change Bad Practices | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
The conclusion is an interesting one for all who want to improve organisational practices. Threats work. But they work very locally, and expensively. The most important way that organizational change happens is actually when organisations learn from each other and that happens much less when threats are involved. So the prosecutions in Bangladesh are important for the families of the victims, and the actions of the social movements in the U.S. are important for the conscience of the activists, but organisations learning from each other’s actions give the strongest results of all.
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How Local Context Shapes Digital Business Abroad

How Local Context Shapes Digital Business Abroad | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

One of the most enticing global entrepreneurial opportunities these days is taking a digital business model that works in the U.S. and transplanting it somewhere else, particularly in a developing country. The appeal is easy to understand: You don’t have to invent a new business model, and the digital nature of these enterprises seems to promise a smooth transition to a new environment. There doesn’t appear to be any supply chain or heavy machinery to worry about. But strangely enough, it’s often the nondigital components of a digital business that are most important for creating value in a new environment. It’s a hidden snag (or opportunity, as we will see) that many entrepreneurs don’t discover until they’re deeply into trying to port a business model to a new place.

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Getting organizational redesign right | McKinsey & Company

Getting organizational redesign right | McKinsey & Company | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

One plausible explanation for this new flurry of activity is the accelerating pace of strategic change driven by the disruption of industries. As a result, every time a company switches direction, it alters the organization to deliver the hoped-for results. Rather than small, incremental tweaks of the kind that might have been appropriate in the past, today’s organizations often need regular shake-ups of the Big Bang variety. Frustratingly, it also appears that the frequency of organizational redesign reflects a high level of disappointment with the outcome. According to McKinsey’s research, less than a quarter of organizational-redesign efforts succeed. Forty-four percent run out of steam after getting under way, while a third fail to meet objectives or improve performance after implementation.

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Novartis on digitizing medicine in an aging world | McKinsey & Company

Novartis on digitizing medicine in an aging world | McKinsey & Company | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it
The global population is aging as life expectancy increases. That means not only is demand for healthcare rising, but the very nature of that care is changing. In this interview, the CEO of Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis, Joseph Jimenez, discusses with McKinsey’s Rik Kirkland issues including the emerging need for regenerative medicine, how digitization is driving innovation, and why Novartis is shifting to an outcomes-based approach for patient treatments. An extended and edited transcript of Jimenez’s remarks follows.
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Are Startups Really Job Engines? Stanford Business

Are Startups Really Job Engines? Stanford Business | Strategy and Competitive Intelligence by Bonnie Hohhof | Scoop.it

After all, those new companies are engines of economic growth and job creation, right? Well, maybe, says Stanford Graduate School of Business professor George Foster. He suggests that policymakers and would-be tycoons alike could do with a sobering belt of reality. In a new multi-country study, he finds that most startups never take off — and among those that do, setbacks destroy a sizable share of the employment and revenue gains in the sector.

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