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Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask?

Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask? | Strategies For Paying Attention | Scoop.it

The first role of trained infotention is to recognize whether or not  multitasking, single-minded focus,  or alert but diffused attention is the most appropriate mind-tool for the task at hand. However, for those many situations in which multitasking is either necessary or preferable or both, the most important question is whether -- and to what degree -- multitasking more effectively is a learnable skill. -- Howard 

 

"Results showed that participants did much better at multitasking after training. Interestingly the benefits transferred to the untrained dual task. Brain training can thus be used to get better at multitasking!"


Via Howard Rheingold
Jenna Becerra's insight:

Before one can think about multitasking, it is important to take into account that it is more than just practice. One has to be metacognitive in his or her approach to learning and paying attention to what is important. Know individual tendencies, but also know that a mind can be trained. Multitasking is not always the right approach, but it is often inevitable. Training one's mind to multitask effectively will only result in efficiency.

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Audrey's comment, January 29, 2013 5:27 AM
Those are possible, however as most social interactions are between people, I would like to see examples of multitasking in relation to the personalities in a typical classroom.
Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:28 AM

Can't the brain be trained in every task? Why not multitasking as well?

Audrey's comment, May 16, 2013 6:37 AM
Yes. Agree.
Strategies For Paying Attention
Ways and recommendations for paying better attention.
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Ask Unclutterer: Managing RSS feeds | Unclutterer

Ask Unclutterer: Managing RSS feeds | Unclutterer | Strategies For Paying Attention | Scoop.it
Reader Lucia wants to know how she can get through the more than 1,000 posts in her RSS reader.
Jenna Becerra's insight:

People cannot only rely on their brains to pay attention; that would be exhausting. Utilizing external attention aids like RSS feeds is unbelievably helpful - it is possible to set up feeds that are filtered based on your interests. It is also important, however, to know how to create and manage RSS feeds so that they don't become daunting and overwhelming like the rest of the Internet. The key is having guidelines for evaluating these feeds as well as managing them.

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The Art and Science of Breathing - Dr. Weil

The Art and Science of Breathing - Dr. Weil | Strategies For Paying Attention | Scoop.it
Jenna Becerra's insight:

Not only is paying attention crucial, especially in today's world of overwhelming media, but knowing how to get into the best state to pay attention is extremely helpful. Paying attention to breathing can reduce stress and create better moods, but it can also set people up to pay better attention to the task at hand. Meditation of the breath clears the mind, making it easier to wade through thoughts and even train the mind. Basically, paying attention with one's mind starts with paying attention to the physical and biological aspects of the human body. It starts with the fundamentals.

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The Science Behind Paying Attention

The Science Behind Paying Attention | Strategies For Paying Attention | Scoop.it
Is a teacher lecturing in front of a classroom effective? Is it possible that the way we teach our children is outdated?
Jenna Becerra's insight:

The mindset one takes into completing a task is crucial. Learning by teaching is becoming more popular as its effectiveness is proven more and more. The key, as with many things in life, is to be open to new things. It is possible to have an open mind and be focused at the same time. When someone gets cocky and thinks they are paying attention to everything, that is exactly when they will miss something. Balancing an open mind with a focused one is the key.

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Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask?

Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask? | Strategies For Paying Attention | Scoop.it

The first role of trained infotention is to recognize whether or not  multitasking, single-minded focus,  or alert but diffused attention is the most appropriate mind-tool for the task at hand. However, for those many situations in which multitasking is either necessary or preferable or both, the most important question is whether -- and to what degree -- multitasking more effectively is a learnable skill. -- Howard 

 

"Results showed that participants did much better at multitasking after training. Interestingly the benefits transferred to the untrained dual task. Brain training can thus be used to get better at multitasking!"


Via Howard Rheingold
Jenna Becerra's insight:

Before one can think about multitasking, it is important to take into account that it is more than just practice. One has to be metacognitive in his or her approach to learning and paying attention to what is important. Know individual tendencies, but also know that a mind can be trained. Multitasking is not always the right approach, but it is often inevitable. Training one's mind to multitask effectively will only result in efficiency.

more...
Audrey's comment, January 29, 2013 5:27 AM
Those are possible, however as most social interactions are between people, I would like to see examples of multitasking in relation to the personalities in a typical classroom.
Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:28 AM

Can't the brain be trained in every task? Why not multitasking as well?

Audrey's comment, May 16, 2013 6:37 AM
Yes. Agree.