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Sketching Out 'Psycho': Production Storyboards From 15 Beloved Films

Sketching Out 'Psycho': Production Storyboards From 15 Beloved Films | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
The blueprints of some visionary directors' most iconic scenes

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Oh I love storyboards that are done well. It's such a hard art form to master. 

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, December 13, 2012 1:25 AM

Cool!  Pen & paper, the original pre-viz mechanism and still going strong today.

Storytelling Genius
Curating stories across the web that transform, disrupt, inspire
Curated by Margaret Doyle
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30 Quick Editing Tips Every Content Creator Needs to Know | Copyblogger

30 Quick Editing Tips Every Content Creator Needs to Know | Copyblogger | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it

Excerpted from article on Copyblogger:
"While keeping diligent focus on your content production, you must also review your past choices, looking for ways to allow more readers to engage with your writing.
In other words you may need to think more like an editor.

Here are 30 editing tips that will help you become a more effective editor-in-chief of the content you create.

***Fall in love with your website:
1. Forget “like.”
2. Sit down; stay awhile.
3. Turn the spotlight outward.
4. Highlight a reason to subscribe.
5. Have discerning taste.
6. Break the rules for a good cause.
7. Don’t call it Google Minus.
8. Check your WordPress before you wreck your WordPress.
9. Tell them what you want.
10. Say no to “yes men.”

***Vamp up your editorial strategy:
11. Water the plant.
12. Prepare; don’t plan.
13. Take yourself out of the equation.
14. Research what’s hot.
15. Seduce your audience.
16. Diversify your topics.
17. Look in nooks and crannies.
18. Tighten up.
19. Walk the line.
20. Log out and mute.

***Make your words irresistible:
21. Try the Fat Ass Fudge diet.
22. Divide and conquer.
23. Use concise language.
24. Outline major points.
25. Write one compelling line.
26. Learn language rules.
27. Avoid word choice mistakes.
28. Examine each letter.
29. Leave time.
30. Regard everything as practice.

Drafts aren’t only rough versions of documents and manuscripts. Most creations are ongoing works in progress..."

Each tip is analyzed with more information and with many external links to explain better the tips.
Read full original article here:
http://www.copyblogger.com/30-editing-tips/

 


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Some good reminders and a little kick in the you know what on copy/content creation. 

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jane jones's curator insight, May 30, 2013 4:34 AM

RED HOT JANE. BUSTY KENT ESCORT

 

http://www,redhotjane.co.uk

Víctor V. Valera Jiménez's curator insight, June 2, 2013 5:34 PM

Excelente artículo de Stefanie Flaxman en Copyblogger en que nos da 30 consejos de edición que todo creador de contenidos necesita saber, agrupándolos en 3 grupos:

 

1.- Enamórate de tu página web.

2.- "Vampiriza" tu estrategia editorial.

3.- Haz tu palabra irresistible.

 

Y es que, en definitiva, ¡tu controlas tu proyecto!

malika bourne's comment, September 13, 2013 5:53 PM
I just had to look 3 times at "Try Fat Ass Diet Book". Got my attention.
Rescooped by Margaret Doyle from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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10 Lessons on Filmmaking from Director Ken Loach

10 Lessons on Filmmaking from Director Ken Loach | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it

Ariston Anderson:  "As a filmmaker, Loach has adopted a working style not unlike that of the characters seen in his films. Unlike the traditional Hollywood model, he’s not driven by his own race to the top, but rather by a collective spirit, a desire to create harmony on the set and to appreciate his crew for a job well done."


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Lessons for life really, Director Ken Loach on filmmaking and the small stories that infer the truth.  

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Henrik Safegaard - Cloneartist's curator insight, April 2, 2013 2:55 AM

Interesting -

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, April 2, 2013 8:30 PM

As a big fan of Loach this page is a treasure trove of advice and ideas.

Angela Antle's curator insight, April 15, 2013 4:02 AM

Ken Loach on building up your community of creators!

Rescooped by Margaret Doyle from Just Story It Biz Storytelling
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Storytelling Tips for Leaders - No. 1 Spotting Stories

http://www.anecdote.com/StorytellingForLeaders You can't get the benefits of storytelling without telling stories. So the first step is getting good at spott...

Via Karen Dietz
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Some solid advice on story capture. Identifying when you are 'in' a story is key to story hunting successfully! 

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Marty Koenig's comment, March 9, 2013 12:13 PM
Right on, I call it THE BIG WHY.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 10, 2013 11:22 AM
Love it Marty!
Leaders Online's curator insight, March 13, 2013 3:48 AM

Om je visie als leider goed over te kunnen brengen is een goede story belangrijk - on- en offline! Hier een paar handige tips om in de gaten te hebben of je het eigenlijk wel een verhaal is - of alleen een promotie-praatje...

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Vancouver selected to host TED Talks starting in 2014

Vancouver selected to host TED Talks starting in 2014 | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Coup for Vancouver tourism considered to be on par with South by Southwest, World Economic Forum
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Very exciting news, TED Talks chooses #Vancouver as new home base! #yvr #inspiration #storytelling

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Once Upon a Soda - Forbes

Once Upon a Soda - Forbes | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Consulting firm Starlight Runner helps movie directors like James Cameron--and big brands from Coca-Cola to Mattel to Pepperidge Farm--keep their stories straight.

Via Simon Staffans
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Recognition of this kind is wonderful to see. The Transmedia storyteller is slowly but surely being understood by business and seen as the invaluable partner in their business strategy, brand development, and culture that they can be. 

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Simon Staffans's curator insight, January 25, 2013 8:26 AM

A look at Starlightrunner, well worth the attention!

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's curator insight, January 26, 2013 10:13 AM

Great article reinforces that it's all about the story.

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My Mom's Blog by Thoroughly Modern Millie

My Mom's Blog by Thoroughly Modern Millie | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Margaret Doyle's insight:

An 87 year old storyteller with a huge following--how great is that? 

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HCD Connect

HCD Connect | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Where optimists take on our world’s challenges by sharing stories, questions & resources'
Margaret Doyle's insight:

This is a cool community. 

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Hans Heesterbeek's curator insight, January 8, 2013 9:37 PM

This is a cool community. 

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Storytelling: Why Stories Attract More Customers

Storytelling: Why Stories Attract More Customers | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
What's the story of your business? Are you wondering how storytelling can help your marketing and sales? To learn about the power of storytelling, I inter

Via Karen Dietz
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Some good advice in here, would add that the process of finding your story is the critical part and often the most illuminating. 

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, December 30, 2012 12:44 PM

Thoughtful interview on storytelling...

Alessio Manca's comment, December 31, 2012 12:42 AM
Glad You Liked the Suggestion Karen :) To me... Storytelling it's You!
Karen Dietz's comment, December 31, 2012 2:59 PM
With great people like you looking out for wonderful things to share, truly I am blessed, as are my readers!
Rescooped by Margaret Doyle from Transmedia: Storytelling for the Digital Age
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Sketching Out 'Psycho': Production Storyboards From 15 Beloved Films

Sketching Out 'Psycho': Production Storyboards From 15 Beloved Films | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
The blueprints of some visionary directors' most iconic scenes

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Oh I love storyboards that are done well. It's such a hard art form to master. 

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, December 13, 2012 1:25 AM

Cool!  Pen & paper, the original pre-viz mechanism and still going strong today.

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I love Jonathan Harris. This is a MUST-READ letter from Jonathan on the evolution of Cowbird over the past year and its new launch. I won't tell you the gold in here. If you read it, you will find ...

Cowbird is the most beautiful place in the world to tell stories.

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10 (More) Amazing Videos About the Creative Process -- The Fuel Of Storytelling

10 (More) Amazing Videos About the Creative Process -- The Fuel Of Storytelling | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
We hand-pick the web's best videos about the creative process from some of the world's most talented creative minds.

 

I stumbled upon this the other day and couldn't wait to share it with you. And I thought Friday would be a great day so you can have a totally inspiring weekend!

 

I've watched all of these videos and they are awesome. And each one is different. Each has its own unique message/messages about creativity, art, life, and work. Fabulous!

 

These are keepers and I've added them to my 'favorites' on YouTube so I can go back and dip into them whenever I need a lift.

 

I hope you enjoy them as much as I do and take away lots of good stuff to incorporate into daily living!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.

 

2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.

 

4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.

 

OK -- on to what I do like!

 

If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz, Margaret Doyle
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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 10:15 AM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 1:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 1:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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To Raise A Generation Of Creative Kids, Let Them Make Their Own Stories

To Raise A Generation Of Creative Kids, Let Them Make Their Own Stories | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
This piece is part of a Collaborative Fund-curated series on creativity and values written by thought leaders in the for-profit, for-good business space.A generation of kids is now growing up with a deluge of new screens, new technologies, and new...

 

A generation of kids is now growing up with a deluge of new screens, new technologies, and new tools that are perfectly set up to help stimulate kids’ natural creative instincts. But these devices can equally be used for passive consumption of media and entertainment. Every time I see our kids walk up to the TV and try to swipe through content wishing it to be a giant iPad, I realize that they’re begging to be able to participate and create with media.

 

We can determine the direction of our children. We need to help facilitate a shift toward helping kids become their own content creators, not just content consumers. For this shift to happen we need to invest in better stories, better technology tools, and better education.

 

COLLABORATIVE STORIES

 

For years, stories have been predominately linear push communications. Elite storytelling auteurs would weave their masterful tales. The great stories were devoured page-by-page, scene-by-scene by an engrossed, yet passive audience. However, kids growing up now will never know this purely passive form of content consumption....


Via siobhan-o-flynn
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These Brands Are Doing Incredible Things On Vine

These Brands Are Doing Incredible Things On Vine | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it

Thanks, Urban Outfitters."


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siobhan-o-flynn's curator insight, May 10, 2013 7:34 PM

there are some super smart effective Vine videos here!

Dr. Pamela Rutledge's curator insight, May 11, 2013 9:52 AM

Good tweets = verbal focus.  Vine challenges visual communication skills.

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Uber Fan Has Real Hobbit House Designed & Built By Architect

Uber Fan Has Real Hobbit House Designed & Built By Architect | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
We have seen many Hobbit houses over the years, but few as beautiful as this one. It's a real life hobbit house created by an architect for a Hobbit fan.

Via siobhan-o-flynn
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Serious immersion in a storyworld. Wow! Just demonstrates how IRL/storyworld's can integrate. 

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siobhan-o-flynn's comment, March 19, 2013 4:04 AM
If I ever get back to NZ I am doing the LOTR tour..
Marcel Aubron-Bülles's curator insight, March 19, 2013 6:34 AM

Very nice building, indeed, but not as 'free from film influence' as they make it in the article ;)

Architect: http://www.archerbuchanan.com/portfolio.asp?isection=3#

Delmai George's curator insight, March 21, 2013 12:48 AM

Creativity and design are inspired by all sorts of things.  In this case, a movie was used but games offer some great settings to explore. Students could take a structure from their favourite game and develop a prototype or they could debate if the structure would be suitable for the real world, what difficulties there might be in designing and building the structure or what sorts of needs/wants does the structure fulfil.   

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The Power of Customer Stories & Testimonials to Engage Employees

The Power of Customer Stories & Testimonials to Engage Employees | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Elaine Baker looks straight into the video camera and tells her story. Elaine is the owner of Paper Potpourri in Haverhill, Massachusetts. Her stationery boutique specializes in invitations …

Via Karen Dietz
Margaret Doyle's insight:

It's such a simple change to make in a workplace with such enormous positive consequences. Story culture equals good health. 

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Casey Strachan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 1:33 PM

Tested and true for building engagement, enhancing customer service, and building both brand and corporate culture.

Casey Strachan's curator insight, February 10, 2013 1:33 PM

Tested and true for building engagement, enhancing customer service, and building both brand and corporate culture.

Karen Dietz's comment, February 14, 2013 6:25 PM
Thanks for your insights Margaret and Casey!
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Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are

Your Body Language Shapes Who You Are | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
It's not uncommon for people to overvalue the importance of demonstrating their competence and power, often at the expense of demonstrating their warmth. People judge trustworthiness before competence.
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Interesting insights. What is your non-verbal story?

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Participation, Not Marginalization: Using People's Stories for Social Good

Participation, Not Marginalization: Using People's Stories for Social Good | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Participation, Not Marginalization: Using People's Stories for Social Good
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Some interesting points to consider here. 

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The Future of Storytelling Techniques

The Future of Storytelling Techniques | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
The Art Of Storytelling In Business Communications And Public Relations
Margaret Doyle's insight:

If you don't subscribe to Ishmaelscorner you should. Great insights from Lou. 

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Ethical Storysharing: My Words, Not My Story : Video For Change

Ethical Storysharing: My Words, Not My Story : Video For Change | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
Margaret Doyle's insight:

Calling all storytellers: Stop and read this. Important. 

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How to Keep Your Audience Interested by Writing Long-Term Story Arcs

How to Keep Your Audience Interested by Writing Long-Term Story Arcs | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
You know it, I know it, and even if you're as cynical as I am about shiny marketing fads, you probably realize that our lives ultimately revolve around stor

Via Karen Dietz
Margaret Doyle's insight:

I've been telling my clients this for a long time, nicely explained here why the long story format works in digital media and why it's important to invest in it. 

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 16, 2012 4:36 PM

This article goes hand-in-hand with another post I curated a few days about about sequencing content.


The author here, Georgina Laidlaw, talks about creating long-term story arcs for your content.


Yes! Great idea! Basically, Laidlaw talks about how a story arc works, and then how to generate content along a story arc over a period of time. Think a long period of time.


She also gives plenty of examples and links to other articles. So there are lots of resources here to dig into.


Laidlaw also mentions how to leverage this kind of content with cross-promotion and spin-offs -- which is different from sequencing stories. Between the two articles I've curated there is lots of food for thought.


As we all get ready for 2013, planning your content around long-term story arcs, along with sequencing your stories will help drive engagement.

Karen Dietz's comment, January 16, 2013 10:15 AM
I agree Margaret! Long form storytelling definitely has a place in the marketing/storytelling mix. My apologies for not responding sooner! I didn't receive a notice about your comment. Have a great day.
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‘Zero Dark Thirty’ and the new reality of reported filmmaking

‘Zero Dark Thirty’ and the new reality of reported filmmaking | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
The film about the hunt for Osama bin Laden mixes entertainment and reporting.

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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, December 13, 2012 9:14 PM

An interesting look at the storytelling genesis of Zero Dark Thirty.  Does it represent a new genre, the "reported film"?

Palabras digitales's curator insight, December 14, 2012 8:49 AM

El problema con  este tipo de películas es que les cuesta mucho ser aceptadas debido a su alto contenido político. Es una forma originalde realización, pero tiene problemas a la hora de mantenerse en un terreno neutral.

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How to Create More Powerful Content Marketing Stories

How to Create More Powerful Content Marketing Stories | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it

Great example and yes, back story is so important!These days, we hear a lot about the fact that content marketers need to be storytellers. Here are tips on how to create powerful content marketing stories.

 

I've curated this great video before from Chipotle, but it deserves another look. Not only did the company win awards and 7 million views for the video, they also took it a step further and told the story behind making the video. Good for them! Back stories are very powerful. Here's the link to the back story video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AFlbGwAW7rw&feature=relmfu 

 

And I really like how the author Manya Chylinski talks about the functions stories serve, and how biz or branding stories can have many of these same functions, but with a twist. Your stories are more than entertainment -- they are your authentic voice. You share them to build loyalty, trust, engage with customers, and grow your business.

 

The author's tips are solid -- but nothing really new. So go watch the video again for a refresher example on effective brand storytelling and the other video as a back-story example!


Thank you fellow curator Giuseppe Mauriello @pinomauriello for finding and sharing this with us!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Just Story It - Scoops

Just Story It - Scoops | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it

Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business.

I've chosen them because they actually make a contribution to our knowledge and wisdom about stories, show us how to apply stories to growing our businesses, or give valuable how-to tips.

 

I weed out all the junk. And besides, who needs another post in why storytelling is important?? Where's the beef?? We want the meat!

 

I've written reviews of each article to share what I like best, what you can get from reading the article, or what may be missing in the article.

 

How To Find A Topic: Click on the Filter tab above, and type in a keyword. All the articles with that keyword will appear.

 

I may occassionally review an article that I think is problematic as a way to educate us all, although most I will simply pass over.  If you wonder if I've seen an article that is not included here, send me a message and I'll respond.

After doing biz story work for over a decade (and with a PhD in Folklore) I hope you find many great insights and tips here. Many thanks for visiting and enjoy the articles!

 

And I hope you will also visit my website for more tips and tools, & take the free Story IQ assessment so you can see how well developed your storytelling skills and knowledge is: http://www.juststoryit.com/storyiq  ;


Via Karen Dietz
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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, September 7, 2013 5:15 AM

Karen is dedicated to the art of Storytelling as a key tool in running a business or any other type of endeavor.  Here at ManufacturingStories.com we fully support this art form as the best way to generate positive and effective change.  Thanks Karen for all of your dedicated and tireless work! It's a tood Story!!

Thorsten Strauss's comment, September 9, 2013 5:15 AM
Hello Karen. "Here are the best articles from across the web that I can find on using stories and storytelling in business." Please scoop a new link to these articles. The link you put in the comments only points at your scoop page. Or was the message that your scoop page IS the collection of the great articles? A bit unclear. (PS: I suggested a scoop for you today)
Karen Dietz's comment, September 11, 2013 5:52 PM
Hi Thorsten -- the link needs fixing and I'm trying to do get that done. Thanks for your patience. The link should actually be to the entire curation. This post is a permanent post that acts as a kind of editorial page. The idea is when people want to direct others to the entire collection, they can scoop/re-scoop this page which should lead people to the site. Thanks for the comment and I'll work on clearing up any confusion! And many thanks for the suggestion, which I thought was fabulous.
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Storytelling Tip: Don't Let Facts Get in the Way

Storytelling Tip: Don't Let Facts Get in the Way | Storytelling Genius | Scoop.it
One of the first lessons I learned as a journalist was never to let the facts get in the way of a good story.

 

It's a lesson you should keep in mind when telling your story, too. In fact, it's a rule every good storyteller knows. And follows.

 

It's not about playing fast and loose with the truth. Far from it. Being honest with your audience is important. It's about knowing what to include when you tell your story -- and, equally important, what to leave out.


Via Gregg Morris, Tourism:Collaterals
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