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Storytelling for Nonprofits
Nonprofit Sustainability Through the Art of Storytelling
Curated by Wilton Blake
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The Power of Storytelling; What Marketers Can Learn From Casey Neistat and Google

The Power of Storytelling; What Marketers Can Learn From Casey Neistat and Google | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

And, last Saturday morning, before I got up and on with my day, I watched his short film entitled ‘Guthrie Beach Raft’ and it got me thinking about the power of storytelling in marketing.

 

Yes, successful marketing is all about emotions -- not facts.

 

There are two videos to view here that make the author's point. The first video is OK -- for whatever reason it didn't really grab me.

 

But the second video about Google Chrome is a hit! That's because it tells a very engaging story about how someone uses Google's integrated suite of tools. It's brilliant.

 

Enjoy both of these -- and take these lessons to heart. When creating your content, decide which emotions you want to evoke in your audience and then craft your material to evoke those. 

 

As the author says, "Sometimes, facts and figures are great, but if you’re really looking to create loyalty and build a relationship with your audience then creating an emotional bond is the way forward."

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her Just Story It Scoops at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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7 Tips for Finding Stories in Your Organization -- Nonprofit or For Profit

7 Tips for Finding Stories in Your Organization -- Nonprofit or For Profit | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

Here are some tips on how you can elicit stories about your organization from colleagues, board members, donors, clients, grantees, and others.

 

Whenever I work with an organization, the toughest part is figuring out how to make storytelling a sustainable activity.  This article helps solve one part of the problem -- how to evoke & collect stories from your stakeholders.

 

Evoking stories is a skill. I've worked with plenty of organizations who have tried to collect stories and failed miserably because they did not know the specific techniques for evoking stories in others.

 

So thank you Thaler for these 7 tips! Follow them and you will evoke amazing stories from others.  These tips will make all the difference for you.


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Thaler Pekar's comment, January 21, 2012 7:30 AM
So glad you like this, Karen! Thank you for reposting.
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Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox

Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

You’d think that a problem makes for an interesting story. But when it comes to telling the story of game-changing innovation, the “problem/solution” model is broken. This is why so many brands and causes have a hard time telling their story. When it comes to business, you want to introduce a paradox, not just a problem.

 

What a great post from colleage Michael Margolis on how to re-think the problem/resolution elements of a story into presenting the possbility & then the obstacle being faced.

 

This is an especially important insight for nonprofits to get because the problem/resolution set up starts out with a negative -- which can be a turn-off for people. As Michale says, we are surrounded by enough problems these days.

 

So turn the problem/resolution dyamic on its head and shift to presenting the possibility/obstacle dynamic instead.  That way you are leading with a positive, and then presenting the obstacle to overcome. Obviously then people's participation in the cause/business will help the obstacle be overcome. Or part of the obstacle has already been overcome with people's help.

 

Now, I would suggest doing the same for any business -- present the possibility and the obstacle, and then the resolution or call to action.

 

I be you'll feel better setting up your story this way, and so will your audience. Let me know how it goes!


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