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Storytelling for Nonprofits
Nonprofit Sustainability Through the Art of Storytelling
Curated by Wilton Blake
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8 Tips for nonprofit [& for profit biz] storytelling

8 Tips for nonprofit [& for profit biz] storytelling | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
What’s your story? Finding and telling an organization’s most compelling stories is always my first step in the consulting process.

 

Here are 8 great storytelling tips for any nonprofit or for profit business. It's all about how to find your stories.

 

There are plenty of articles on how to tell a really engaging story that moves people to action. But where do you get those stories from?

 

Follow these tips and you will soon have a wealth of stories to choose from!  I particularly like tip #6 -- Listen. Yes! So often this is left out of the equation. We are so busy thinking about the questions to ask and how to respond that we forget that the magic in evoking stories is simply to listen delightedly -- not critically.

 

And then tip #8 -- don't polish your stories too much. Well, keep them authentic but do clean them up a bit. There is no excuse not to have a well-crafted story. Not everyone on video is a good storyteller. And turning a recorded story into a well-written story takes crafting. My advice? Craft an awesome story while keeping it authentic --you want the person telling the story to be shown in the best light possible!


Via Karen Dietz
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Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox

Inside the Storytelling Matrix, Part 1: Problem and Paradox | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

You’d think that a problem makes for an interesting story. But when it comes to telling the story of game-changing innovation, the “problem/solution” model is broken. This is why so many brands and causes have a hard time telling their story. When it comes to business, you want to introduce a paradox, not just a problem.

 

What a great post from colleage Michael Margolis on how to re-think the problem/resolution elements of a story into presenting the possbility & then the obstacle being faced.

 

This is an especially important insight for nonprofits to get because the problem/resolution set up starts out with a negative -- which can be a turn-off for people. As Michale says, we are surrounded by enough problems these days.

 

So turn the problem/resolution dyamic on its head and shift to presenting the possibility/obstacle dynamic instead.  That way you are leading with a positive, and then presenting the obstacle to overcome. Obviously then people's participation in the cause/business will help the obstacle be overcome. Or part of the obstacle has already been overcome with people's help.

 

Now, I would suggest doing the same for any business -- present the possibility and the obstacle, and then the resolution or call to action.

 

I be you'll feel better setting up your story this way, and so will your audience. Let me know how it goes!


Via Karen Dietz
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Inspired Giving -- Using Stories To Increase Donations

Inspired Giving -- Using Stories To Increase Donations | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

One of the greatest challenges for non-profits today is how to increase donations.

 

No matter what time of year it is, nonprofits are always faced with the challenge of raising funds.  So I have several resources to share with you that I trust will help you find, craft, and share your stories better to make your fundraising more successful.

 

There's a PowerPoint presentation and audio recording that go together talking about the how and why stories work in fundraising, worksheets to help you develop your non-profits core stories, and an academic article talking about what nonprofit stories must have in order for them to work.

 

Enjoy...


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15 Tips to Building A Better NonProfit Marketing Strategy

15 Tips to Building A Better NonProfit Marketing Strategy | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
Storytelling is one of the premiere problems in the nonprofit marketing world. Nonprofit institutions tend to publish and distribute content that reads more like a portfolio than a story.
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Q&A with a Story Guru: Patrick Reinsborough Part 3: Book Gives Momentum to Harnessing Power of Narrative

Q&A with a Story Guru: Patrick Reinsborough Part 3: Book Gives Momentum to Harnessing Power of Narrative | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
Q: What kind of response have you had to your book Re:Imagining Change?

A: The response has been really fantastic. The book has been out for a little over a year, and it’s now on its second printing. . . . It’s helped advanced the discussions around narrative and framing to include a more refined sense of power and how to apply a narrative power analysis to social-justice campaigns.
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How the Nonprofit Sector is Misusing its Greatest Asset

How the Nonprofit Sector is Misusing its Greatest Asset | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
Combing through my attic a couple of weeks ago, I noticed a box of books from my undergraduate days lying in the corner. Going through the box, I was instantly taken back to some of my favorite classes, where new worlds opened up to me through books like the Manchild in the Promised Land by Claude Brown, The Jungle by Upton Sinclair, and 20 Years at Hull-House by Jane Addams.

As I reread them, I was again amazed at how vividly some of these books outlined the class struggles of their day. They not only explore issues around poverty in American society, but also changed the face of the social service sector and the government’s response to the poor.

I realized that no one is telling stories like these today.
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The Four Cs of NonProfit Storytelling

The Four Cs of NonProfit Storytelling | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
How would you like to tell donors stories that are more compelling and emotionally engaging? With the Four C's, you can.
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Effective Nonprofit Storytelling: Charity “Aspire” Gets Funding Through Targeted Emails Bearing Mini-Graphic Novels

Effective Nonprofit Storytelling: Charity “Aspire” Gets Funding Through Targeted Emails Bearing Mini-Graphic Novels | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
Merely knowing what a charity does isn’t always enough to convince potential donors to lend financial support. Sometimes you have to know who the charity does it for, too.

 

Now how creative is this?!! I love that nonprofit Aspire uses an infographic to share a story, and also creates a very effective video story about their email campaign using the infographic.

 

The infographic is not about the organization, but about the people it serves.  Yeah! They got it right!

 

Enjoy this material. You too can do this! And I encourage you to do so. It is quite ingenious and it will gain you results.


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Neuroscience Proves Why Your Nonprofit Stories Move Supporters To Action @johnhaydon

Neuroscience Proves Why Your Nonprofit Stories Move Supporters To Action @johnhaydon | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it

"In your brain, you have neurons called “mirror” neurons. These brain cells are essentially the “soft-wiring” behind empathy. It’s why you feel sadness when a friend is struggling, and happy when they overcome an obstacle. You experience their ups and downs as if they are yours.

 

This video explains more about the science behind empathy. You’ll learn why stories work better than stats in your online (and offline) appeals. You’ll learn why pictures elicite a strong emotional response than text."

 

Don't let the title fool you -- even though this is slanted to non-profits, we all need to know this information.

 

By watching this video (which takes very complex notions and breaks them down into simple-to-understand chunks), you will learn a alot about empathy. I quibble with a few points, but overall it's a good synopsis.

 

What is the connection to story?  Well, by sharing a story you connect with your audience through empathy.  So the more you understand about how and why empathy works, the more you will master business storytelling. 

 

Enjoy the video and let me know what you think!


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Movie Mondays - Methods for collecting and using your nonprofit's stories - Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues

Movie Mondays - Methods for collecting and using your nonprofit's stories - Women's Philanthropy--Women's Issues | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
Nonprofit storytelling is still extremely important when it comes to fundraising. Sometimes it can be difficult to get the best stories and to use them to engage donors.

In this week's movie, Zan McColloch-Lussier tells you some of the methods he's used to collect and share stories. He also tells how one organization uses stories in such a way that it keeps him donating to them on a regular basis.

Here's the link to the movie:

http://www.501videos.com/mm2011/07/mm_2_story.html
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Stories Are a Vital Source of Knowledge

Stories Are a Vital Source of Knowledge | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
<<< This is from 2009. But hey, isn't that what curation is all about? >>>

Imagine asking every one of your staff members: "Tell me about the time you felt most connected to the mission of our organization." Ask your program officers, your CFO, your facilities staff. Imagine the range of responses. Imagine the passion you will unleash, and the information you will glean.

Most of the stories you hear in response to that question will not be "diamonds," perfectly encapsulating the mission and brand of your organization. The stories and anecdotes you hear will be more like pebbles and sea glass -- small, colorful glimpses into the meaning of your organization and its work in the daily lives of the people it affects. They will teach you much about the depth and breadth of your organization's impact.
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The Benefits of Building a Narrative Organization

The Benefits of Building a Narrative Organization | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
The value of narrative in your organization extends well beyond telling stories in your annual report and newsletters.

When an organization embraces narrative and applies it throughout its work, brand identity is clear and appealing; audiences are quickly and sustainably engaged; leaders appreciate and strategically share stories; and knowledge is easily gathered and shared.
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Q&A with a Story Guru: Patrick Reinsborough Part 2: Helping Progressive Movements Communicate Compelling Stories

Q&A with a Story Guru: Patrick Reinsborough Part 2: Helping Progressive Movements Communicate Compelling Stories | Storytelling for Nonprofits | Scoop.it
smartMeme's Founding Story:

SmartMeme began as a three-day training exploring strategies for building a transformative, earth-centered social movement in a North American context. The founding collective brought together a number of people who were veterans of different social movements — fighting to protect the environment, stop wars, organizing for racial and economic justice.

We all shared a common analysis of the need for fundamental change in the direction of our society but brought very different skills to the table. My background was as a grassroots organizer, campaigner and direct action strategist.

The other founders included an advertiser, a filmmaker and a forest ecologist turned international finance campaigner. As the project evolved we were fortune to add a fifth person to our collective — a teacher who had decided to work as an educator in social movements rather than in a traditional class room setting. . . .
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