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Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms
Children's Novels, Middle Grades, Young Adults Novels making their way into today's classrooms- and tips on how to get there!
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Virtual Author Visits in Your Library or Classroom - Skype An Author Network

Virtual Author Visits in Your Library or Classroom - Skype An Author Network | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
A place to join a network of authors willing to Skype into classrooms to speak with teachers and children.
StorySpirit4U's insight:

This is a great tool for teachers! Imagine the possiblities with this.

Teachers- Have you used this feature and what are your thoughts?

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StorySpirit4U's comment, April 9, 2013 8:59 AM
I'm creating a package for authors who uset Skype to ask comprehension questions that count.
StorySpirit4U's curator insight, August 23, 2013 8:32 AM

I am offering this service to schools also!

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Differentiation: What It Is and Is Not

Differentiation: What It Is and Is Not | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
What Differentiated Instruction Is--And Is Not: The Definition Of Differentiated Instruction

 

by TeachThought Staff

For teacher’s and administrators, a useful definition of differentiated instruction is “adapting content, process, or product” according to a specific student’s “readiness, interest, and learning profile.”


Via Mel Riddile
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How A 17-Year-Old Gave Her School A Big Wake-Up Call

How A 17-Year-Old Gave Her School A Big Wake-Up Call | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
Jilly Dos Santos, 17, convinced her school to push its start time back so students could get more sleep -- and other schools are following her lead. Find out why the movement to begin class later is gaining steam.

By Jane Bianchi

On a typ...

Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, August 14, 6:03 AM

Sleep deprivation results in lost learning and more bad bahavior. 

StorySpirit4U's curator insight, August 14, 9:10 AM

It just takes one to make a difference. We have some remarkable children if we just take some time to listen.

Betty Skeet's curator insight, August 17, 8:44 AM

Young people need to sleep more to be more receptive and less cranky...see what a 17 year old achieved when s he made a difference in her school's approach...

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21 Simple Ideas To Increase Student Motivation

21 Simple Ideas To Increase Student Motivation | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
21 Simple Ideas To Improve Student Motivation

 

"The best lessons, books, and materials in the world won’t get students excited about learning and willing to work hard if they’re not motivated.

Motivation, both intrinsic and extrinsic, is a key factor in the success of students at all stages of their education, and teachers can play a pivotal role in providing and encouraging that motivation in their students."


Via Mel Riddile
StorySpirit4U's insight:

Great way to start the new year off right! 

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Can School Security, Police Search a Threatening Parent?

Can School Security, Police Search a Threatening Parent? | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it

"The Fourth Amendment offers a different standard for school systems and the police. Law enforcement officers must have "probable cause" to search or seize someone without a warrant. By contrast, schools operate on the lower level of "reasonable suspicion" - primarily because courts recognize that schools have a duty to safeguard the health and safety of minors, and their job is not criminal prosecution but education."


Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, May 27, 9:41 AM


"Lessons for Principals and Teachers:

  • Do you have proper security at school sporting events to protect district employees? 
  • As a principal, have you developed enough trust in the school community that you will receive tips when trouble is afoot?
  • Do you have sworn police officers or security guards serving as school resource officers? The standard for search and seizure varies depending on the status. 
  • School officials do not have to wait until trouble happens to act pre-emptively to avoid violence or harm."
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Everything you need to know about Common Core — Ravitch

Everything you need to know about Common Core — Ravitch | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
The past, present and future of the standards.

Via Tracee Orman
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Tracee Orman's curator insight, January 19, 4:43 PM

Great read. I find the CCSS lacking in so many areas, especially the text-to-self and text-to-world connections that are so important. So I make sure to continue to include those questions even though they aren't "Core" questions. I'm not going to stop teaching mostly literature, either. When students take a literature course in college, they aren't going to be reading informational texts! And if students don't have that initial connection to a text, they're going to Spark-Note it instead. 

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Wattpad - Discover a World of Unlimited Stories - Read free books and stories

Wattpad - Discover a World of Unlimited Stories - Read free books and stories | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
Join the Wattpad community to read, vote and chat with readers and writers for free.
StorySpirit4U's insight:
I have read more great stories here by some up and coming new authors!
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Fiction and Nonfiction Interact in the Common Core Classroom

Fiction and Nonfiction Interact in the Common Core Classroom | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it

In this video podcast How Fiction and Nonfiction Can Interact in the Common Core Classroom, Lauren Davis sets the record straight on how much fiction is still allowed in the Common Core, how it can be taught along with nonfiction, and provides suggestions for selecting and incorporating engaging nonfiction texts.


Via Mel Riddile
StorySpirit4U's insight:

As teachers, we need to expose our students to more texts where they meet the CCS . Test scores improve with more exposure to these novels.

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River Hill High School's curator insight, April 5, 2013 3:22 PM

Will Common Core kill literature?  According to this podcast, fiction and non-fiction can coexist in the classroom. (It says "video podcast," but you only need to listen--not much worth watching).

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Does Reading Boost IQ?

Does Reading Boost IQ? | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it

The study "found associations between earlier reading ability and later nonverbal intelligence, as well as later verbal intelligence."


Via Mel Riddile
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 8, 9:37 PM

Reading is an enriching process.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Terry Doherty's curator insight, August 11, 4:36 PM

The headline is a 'grabber' but the devil is in the details, as they say. There is some interesting research going on - and some ideas for further consideration.This study focused on identical twins.

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What teachers should be doing to meet the ELA Common Core

What teachers should be doing to meet the ELA Common Core | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it

Article by Lauren Davis, Senior Editor, Eye on Education

 

Lead High-Level, Text-based DiscussionsFocus on Process, Not Just ContentCreate Assignments for Real Audiences and with Real PurposeTeach Argument, Not PersuasionIncrease Text Complexity
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How A 17-Year-Old Gave Her School A Big Wake-Up Call

How A 17-Year-Old Gave Her School A Big Wake-Up Call | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
Jilly Dos Santos, 17, convinced her school to push its start time back so students could get more sleep -- and other schools are following her lead. Find out why the movement to begin class later is gaining steam.

By Jane Bianchi

On a typ...

Via Mel Riddile
StorySpirit4U's insight:

It just takes one to make a difference. We have some remarkable children if we just take some time to listen.

more...
Mel Riddile's curator insight, August 14, 6:03 AM

Sleep deprivation results in lost learning and more bad bahavior. 

Betty Skeet's curator insight, August 17, 8:44 AM

Young people need to sleep more to be more receptive and less cranky...see what a 17 year old achieved when s he made a difference in her school's approach...

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3 Types Of Messages To Ignore On Social Media

3 Types Of Messages To Ignore On Social Media | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
Do we have to answer every message people send to us? At what point do we draw the line? Here's a quick guide from Rachel Thomopson (aka @RachelintheOC)

Via Lynnette Phillips
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Crystal Hutter: "Teachers Will Connect to Drive Change in 2014" (EdSurge News)

Crystal Hutter: "Teachers Will Connect to Drive Change in 2014" (EdSurge News) | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it

This past year, we also saw teachers collaborate by connecting with classrooms in other countries. First, second, and third graders at Meadowlark Elementary in North Carolina created videos and blog posts, and shared information with a class at Pt. England Primary School in Auckland, New Zealand. We also had a math teacher from Ithaca Senior High School conduct a geometry project with a class in India.

 

“Students seem to really enjoy these projects because they focus on global issues,” the teacher explained. “They are always surprised by how similar they are to students in other schools. It turns out that adolescence transcends national boundaries.”


Via iEARN-USA
StorySpirit4U's insight:

And this is  our future. Let's prepare our children to move forth into the global mindset.

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Virtual Author Visits in Your Library or Classroom - Skype An Author Network

Virtual Author Visits in Your Library or Classroom - Skype An Author Network | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
A place to join a network of authors willing to Skype into classrooms to speak with teachers and children.
StorySpirit4U's insight:

I am offering this service to schools also!

more...
StorySpirit4U's curator insight, April 9, 2013 8:38 AM

This is a great tool for teachers! Imagine the possiblities with this.

Teachers- Have you used this feature and what are your thoughts?

StorySpirit4U's comment, April 9, 2013 8:59 AM
I'm creating a package for authors who uset Skype to ask comprehension questions that count.
Rescooped by StorySpirit4U from Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

More Teachers Group Students by Ability

More Teachers Group Students by Ability | Getting Your Book Adopted into Classrooms | Scoop.it
After being condemned as discriminatory in the 1990s, grouping students by academic ability seems to be back in vogue with a new generation of teachers, according to an analysis of federal teacher data.

Via Mel Riddile
StorySpirit4U's insight:
As a reading support teacher this system works as we teach to their reading level and can address groups with similar needs.
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Patrice Bucci's curator insight, April 8, 2013 6:59 PM

makes sense...

Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, September 8, 2013 10:55 AM

Streamling students by ability was condemned back in the 1990s; it appears grouping students by academic ability seems to be back in vogue. Recent trialling across college (for English & Maths) worked extremely well, particularly lower levels.  Results from my own survey showed that 85% of students (entry level) preferred to be grouped and felt less pressurised.