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What's the Story?
Character - Plot - Tone
Curated by M. W. Catlin
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How to Write Descriptive Passages Without Boring the Reader or Yourself

How to Write Descriptive Passages Without Boring the Reader or Yourself | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Describing stuff can be the hardest part of writing prose fiction. You have a scene in your head, with all the dialogue and action, but now you have to fill in what everything looks like. There's nothing more boring to write, or read, than a long descriptive passage -- but here's how to spice it up.
M. W. Catlin's insight:

"Try being super terse."   This is the best advice EVER.  

 

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3 Act Structure - Story Structure Tips - Screenwriting - YouTube

We cover 3 act structure, the main plot points in film structure, and the reasons why story structure is so important for screenwriting and filmmaking, Dario...
M. W. Catlin's insight:

Great nutshell!

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9 Creative Storytelling Methods

9 Creative Storytelling Methods | What's the Story? | Scoop.it

 

 


Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, August 11, 4:17 AM


Eli Epstein:  "When an author set out to tell a story in years past, he or she typically did so on paper, a typewriter or by typing at a computer. But today, storytellers find imaginative ways to share their ideas with interactive and visual elements. On modern mediums like Twitter, Vine, YouTube and other mobile applications, storytellers are crafting tales in ways that would have been unfathomable a decade ago."

Christophe Peckeu's curator insight, August 11, 7:58 AM

add your insight...

 

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The Science of Storytelling

The Science of Storytelling | What's the Story? | Scoop.it

Many studies show us that our brains prefer storytelling to facts.When we read facts, only the language parts of our brains work to understand the meaning. When we read a story, the language parts of our brains and any other part of the brain that we would use if we were actually experiencing what we’re reading, light up.This means that it’s easier for us to remember stories than facts. Our brains can't make major distinctions between a story we’re reading about and something we are actually doing....


Via Jeff Domansky, M. W. Catlin
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Maria Persson's curator insight, September 30, 6:49 PM

Something about telling our stories can often keep us in loops of despair and darkness but in sharing them these clouds can often lift and lead to empowerment and engagement with the world around us again!

 

This is a great infographic suggesting how physiological aspects are affected by storytelling...believe it or not - do the research and make your own mind up!

 

Commercial aspects aside and the idea of branding, how could this concept work in  educational environments? Need to give this more thought...ideas anyone - very welcome!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 1, 3:55 PM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, October 3, 2:02 AM

One more proof to show how important storytelling may be!

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The Science of Storytelling

The Science of Storytelling | What's the Story? | Scoop.it

Many studies show us that our brains prefer storytelling to facts.When we read facts, only the language parts of our brains work to understand the meaning. When we read a story, the language parts of our brains and any other part of the brain that we would use if we were actually experiencing what we’re reading, light up.This means that it’s easier for us to remember stories than facts. Our brains can't make major distinctions between a story we’re reading about and something we are actually doing....


Via Jeff Domansky
M. W. Catlin's insight:

I've been talking about these ideas in my workshops for quite a while now.  We are hardwired for story.  It's one, if not a significant reason for our "success" as a species.  It's also one of the incredible frustrations of our times.   That science and facts yield the field to the fiction of prevarication and conspiracy is a tragedy.  

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Maria Persson's curator insight, September 30, 6:49 PM

Something about telling our stories can often keep us in loops of despair and darkness but in sharing them these clouds can often lift and lead to empowerment and engagement with the world around us again!

 

This is a great infographic suggesting how physiological aspects are affected by storytelling...believe it or not - do the research and make your own mind up!

 

Commercial aspects aside and the idea of branding, how could this concept work in  educational environments? Need to give this more thought...ideas anyone - very welcome!

ManufacturingStories's curator insight, October 1, 3:55 PM

For more resources on STEM Education visit http://bit.ly/1640Tbl

Ricard Garcia's curator insight, October 3, 2:02 AM

One more proof to show how important storytelling may be!

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True Detective won't have a huge Shyamalan twist and here is why

True Detective won't have a huge Shyamalan twist and here is why | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Shyamalan twists, unless you can really pull them off artfully, are a cheap gimmick. They are a bullshit magic trick that gets in the way of real storytelling. Certainly, being surprised by plot elements is great -- it is preferable that the audience cannot see what is coming. But more important than clever plot mechanics is the way the story affects the characters -- what the narrative does to them, how it changes them, what it teaches them, and what they gain or lose in the process.
M. W. Catlin's insight:

For my Plotters.

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The Power of Community Storytelling - Wired

The Power of Community Storytelling - Wired | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Wired
The Power of Community Storytelling
Wired
The power of community storytelling lies not only in the stories created – but also in the process of their creation.
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How to Write Descriptive Passages Without Boring the Reader or Yourself

How to Write Descriptive Passages Without Boring the Reader or Yourself | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Describing stuff can be the hardest part of writing prose
fiction. You have a scene in your head, with all the dialogue and action, but
now you have to fill in what everything looks
like.
M. W. Catlin's insight:

When it comes to screenwriting, the question is: not only how descriptive can you be, but how evocative as well.  How few words does it take to put the reader in the place and time you are writing about. 

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Top 10 tips for writing a Hollywood blockbuster - BBC News

Top 10 tips for writing a Hollywood blockbuster - BBC News | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
BBC News
Top 10 tips for writing a Hollywood blockbuster
BBC News
Tony Gilroy, one of Hollywood's most sought-after screenwriters, is responsible for The Devil's Advocate, Armageddon and the Bourne films, to name just a few.
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Pixar's 22 Rules of Storytelling - Imgur

Former Pixar story artist Emma Coats tweeted this series of “story basics” in 2011.https://twitter.com/lawnrocket These were guidelines that she learned from her more senior colleagues on how to create appealing stories. I superimposed all 22 rules over stills from Pixar films to help me remember them. (All Disney copyrights, trademarks, and logos are owned by The Walt Disney Company.)


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, September 20, 2013 1:55 PM

Good tips for storytellers.

Jerome D. Simon's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:33 PM

une belle keynote, instructive de plus

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How Breaking Bad broke free of the clockwork-universe problem

How Breaking Bad broke free of the clockwork-universe problem | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
It involves Shakespeare.
M. W. Catlin's insight:

I love this show.   This analsys, hits the nail squarely on the head.

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Cormac McCarthy’s Surprisingly Emotional First Drafts

Cormac McCarthy’s Surprisingly Emotional First Drafts | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Bloodless dawn. The old cowboy sets out across the sharp-footed malpías toward the volcanic cone.
M. W. Catlin's insight:

Insight to the process of a writer's writer.

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Creative Ways to Build a Climax: An Analysis of the Suspense & Timing of 'Drive'

Creative Ways to Build a Climax: An Analysis of the Suspense & Timing of 'Drive' | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Great storytelling isn't just about giving information to your audience. It's also about when and how you give it to them.
M. W. Catlin's insight:

This is a great piece on layering of the narrative.   Really excellent. 

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A Writer's Guide to Being a Writer: Part 1 - Huffington Post

A Writer's Guide to Being a Writer: Part 1 - Huffington Post | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
A Writer's Guide to Being a Writer: Part 1 Huffington Post And this is fine when you're writing your book, frankly two's a crowd at that point, but afterwards as you attempt to navigate the dark and murky world of actually getting something...
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The psychology of storytelling: What can e-learning creators learn from Star Wars? | The Marketers Mega Toolkit

The psychology of storytelling: What can e-learning creators learn from Star Wars? | The Marketers Mega Toolkit | What's the Story? | Scoop.it

"In the last two post of this series, we discussed why stories present ideal contexts for learning and shared a helpful infographic about why e-learning provides more effective training and improves retention. ..."


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Where literature and gaming collide

Where literature and gaming collide | What's the Story? | Scoop.it

Via The Digital Rocking Chair
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The Digital Rocking Chair's curator insight, July 28, 12:11 AM


Thomas McMullan:  "Game narratives tend to drink from a narrow pond; they swig space operas and Tolkien, swish them about their mouths and trickle them into rows of polished glasses."

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10 Things That Every Brand New Creator of Science Fiction Should Know

10 Things That Every Brand New Creator of Science Fiction Should Know | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
Being a science fiction creator is the most amazing adventure -- you get to invent whole new worlds, brand new futures, and fantastic technologies, and you get to tell the most incredible stories about them. But it's also a tough and heartbreaking career path, whether you're in books, comics, movies or television. Here are 10 things that every brand new science fiction creator ought to know at the start.
M. W. Catlin's insight:
#1 "You're still telling personal stories." That's important no matter genre.
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The Universal Shapes of Stories, According to Kurt Vonnegut

The Universal Shapes of Stories, According to Kurt Vonnegut | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
The fundamental concept behind Kurt Vonnegut's master's thesis in anthropology at the University of Chicago was, in Vonnegut's words, "that stories have shapes which can be drawn on graph paper."
M. W. Catlin's insight:

These may be nothing more than elemental story forms....but, from Vonnegut and his mind....they are gold.

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An Interview With Breaking Bad Writer Moira Walley-Beckett | KesslerU

An Interview With Breaking Bad Writer Moira Walley-Beckett | KesslerU | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
I recently had the fortune of having a candid and insightful conversation with the extremely talented Breaking Bad writer and co-executive producer Moira Walley-Beckett. We talked about the television writing process, ...
M. W. Catlin's insight:

This is my favorite show when it comes to writing.  Every episode is courageous in that there was NEVER a moment where the writers "blinked" and when for an easy out . The key is clearly in the amount of preperation they took on each and every season and episode.  It's a lesson to every story teller.  Take the time. 

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Download Over 30 Screenplays From 2013, Including ‘The Wolf of Wall Street,’ ’12 Years a Slave,’ ‘Gravity’ & More

Download Over 30 Screenplays From 2013, Including ‘The Wolf of Wall Street,’ ’12 Years a Slave,’ ‘Gravity’ & More | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
One of the few benefits of the frenzied awards race is Hollywood's outpouring of materials associated with the contenders. Perhaps the biggest perk is the
M. W. Catlin's insight:

If you are looking for a source to reference, research or enjoy.  Try this. 

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A Curated Collection of Daily Quotes Matched to Relevant Songs: Literary Jukebox

A Curated Collection of Daily Quotes Matched to Relevant Songs: Literary Jukebox | What's the Story? | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
M. W. Catlin's insight:

Really nice way to combined a couple of my favorite things, music and literature.   

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Robin Good's curator insight, November 3, 2013 2:39 PM



Maria Popova is the author of Literary Jukebox, a fascinating collection of daily quotes from her favorite books, each one thematically matched to a song.


She writes about it: "Sometimes, the connections will be fairly obvious. Other times, they might be more esoteric and require some reflection.


Literary Jukebox is truly a work of love and a great example of how curating something you truly enjoy, can create permanent value, while providing cultural insight, an opportunity for music discovery to the reader as well as exposure and visibility to the books and music authors included.



N.B.: I encourage you to support Maria's work, as she is a brilliant and inspiring mind and her work on Brain Pickings is a clear demonstration of someone whose work benefits no big brand, advertiser or sponsor, but the likes of you and me and our ability to remain curious.  

  

Get inspired: http://literaryjukebox.brainpickings.org/ 


See also: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/08/09/introducing-literary-jukebox/ 


Check out Brain Pickings on Twitter:


Consider subscribing to the email newsletter digest. Here's a sample issue on how to worry less about money, timeless advice on courage and the creative life, why going back to school is a bad idea, and more. 




 



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Story is Structure Part II: The Monomyth in Practice

Story is Structure Part II: The Monomyth in Practice | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
This article first appeared on cmyplay. It has been inc…
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Remembering Elmore Leonard, A Writer Who Hated Literature - NPR

Remembering Elmore Leonard, A Writer Who Hated Literature - NPR | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
NPR Remembering Elmore Leonard, A Writer Who Hated Literature NPR Elmore Leonard was a writer who hated — and I don't mean disliked; Elmore had a contempt for putting pretty clothes on hard, direct words, so I mean hated — literature, or at least...
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Story is Structure Part II: The Monomyth in Practice

Story is Structure Part II: The Monomyth in Practice | What's the Story? | Scoop.it
This article first appeared on cmyplay. It has been inc…
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