Story and Narrative
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Story and Narrative
What's Your Story?
Curated by Gregg Morris
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5 Storytelling Tips to Create Engaging Content

5 Storytelling Tips to Create Engaging Content | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
A couple of years ago while at a conference in California, I met Simon Kelly, the Chief Enthusiasm Officer at Story Worldwide. We sat on the same content marketing panel. At one point, he leaned over to me and handed me his business card. I took one look, and knew it was a keeper. It stood out so much that to this day I still have it tacked above my credenza. The funny thing is the back of his business card faces out. You want to know why?

Because printed on the back it says:

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Storytelling

Storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Humans are storytelling creatures. Whenever someone says, “that reminds me of a story…” we prick up our ears and settle in to listen. Two recent Scientific American articles, The Secrets of Storytelling and Fiction Hones Social Skills shed new light on the intricacies and importance of storytelling. The first article, by Jeremy Hsu on the secrets of storytelling, hones in on why our human brains seem to be particularly well wired for both telling and hearing stories.

The impact of storytelling
The second article dispels the myth that avid readers are isolated bookworms, out of touch with their social world.

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Life Writing: A Bit of Looking Back, A Lot of Looking Ahead

Life Writing: A Bit of Looking Back, A Lot of Looking Ahead | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

Some interesting life-writing items I’ve come across recently reflect end-of-the-old-year/beginning-of-the-new-year themes.

Professional Personal Historian Dan Curtis (pictured) published a list of The Top Personal History Blogs of 2011, some of which I know well and will also be well-known to readers here. (Do read his post to learn his criteria for the list and which blogs he considers to be the best of the best). Here are his picks with his commentary:

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Huang Yahong's curator insight, May 2, 2013 11:39 PM

after seeing this topic, i am thinking to apply a blog for myself in order to record my daily life and recall those for somedays in the future.

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Stories That Create Trust

Stories That Create Trust | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

When the topic of storytelling is brought up in the board room for a company or in the marketing department for a brand, many people expect that they have to create a novel or epic. In fact the stories we speak of in storytelling are small. Sometimes they are just turn of phrases or metaphor. The best way to think of them are to think of the film premise you read on the back of a DVD. They capture nearly two hours of a film into a couple of sentences. From this stories can be expanded or told in chapters but often the essence or premise of the story is told most frequently.

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The Art of Storytelling

The Art of Storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Storytelling: Marketing and advertising have changed irrevocably. Organizations are now telling stories to connect with customers. Storytelling isn't hard, but it isn't easy either.
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Write What You Know

Write What You Know | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

I've heard the saying, "Write what you know." It's because to write well the reader needs to feel a sense of truth to the story and its characters. Even in fiction, that connection, that sense that something is ringing true, must be there.

 

I got thinking a lot about this idea when I was home over the holidays. It's tough when a loved one isn't around and the holidays come to being. A few years ago my grandpa passed away and every year since I've made a point of reflecting on stories about him with my grandma. It keeps him fresh in our minds in the most wonderful of ways.

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Humanizing the Web - New sites aim for story-telling that connects us

Humanizing the Web - New sites aim for story-telling that connects us | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
That kind of curation has moved online, and there will be more and more of it. Stories on Cowbird can be grouped together by day, place or event, for instance, piecing together a tale from the inside out. The goal is to create a vast but concise online library of experience.

 

In the end, though, do stories really solve anything? You can lead us to quality "content" and we still might not click. And even if sites are accessible in multiple languages, can they truly capture global experience? A quarter of the European Union's 500 million people have never used the Internet. Are their stories ignorable?

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Yahki :: Tell it | Share It | Follow It

Yahki :: Tell it | Share It | Follow It | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

[Not quite Cowbird but nice nonetheless.]

 

Yahki enables you to tell your own story - use the web content, links, photos& videos to create a new story & share it with your friends on facebook and twiiter.

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Storytelling for Business Bloggers

Storytelling for Business Bloggers | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

[I am a big fan of Victoria and her work. While this is from last year (somehow I missed it), the advice is timeless.] 

 

(Professional editor and blogger A. Victoria Mixon offers storytelling strategies for business bloggers.)

 

You’re in a really bad bind.

You’ve got a business—a product or a service—and you need to get the word out about what you offer. Not only that, but you’re up against an implacable deadline: either you start moving revenue fast, or you start moving out of your office space.

You’re smart, creative, driven. Cornered.

You’re the ideal fiction protagonist!

And this is how you must think of yourself when you blog, because readers of all stripes and colors, fiction and nonfiction alike, read for only two reasons:

 

1. to learn something they need to learn about survival

 

2. to be reassured live is worth surviving

 

Readers want to know how others have made it, so they know they can make it, too.

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The Stories Behind 11 More Classic Album Covers

The Stories Behind 11 More Classic Album Covers | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

Last month, Bill DeMain took us behind the scenes for 11 iconic album covers. Today he’s back with 11 more.

 

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7 Essential Stories Every Organization Should Know and Tell

7 Essential Stories Every Organization Should Know and Tell | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Organization communication has the power to be effective through the use of seven types of stories, all essential to success.

 

Back in the early ‘90s some good friends of mine, Tom and Mike and their lovely wives Tanya and Trish, opened a coffee shop in quite possibly the worst retail location in Hillsboro, OR. Numerous businesses had opened in that spot, and just as quickly closed. However, the Whitehorse Coffee Co would break that trend in a remarkable illustration of the power stories have to define an organization and lay the groundwork for success.

 

Sharing stories was integral to the business. Even before I asked to join them I could recite how they came up with both the idea for the shop (soaking in a southern Oregon hot spring) and the name (the name of the spring, of course!). They introduced me to the shop not through a mission statement or a collection of abstract values but through a very simple description: “Everyone needs a comfortable escape. We want to be our clients’ extra living room, but filled with good conversation (when desired) and no need to clean up.” Though not a story in the strictest sense, this description provides all the detail necessary to create our own story with the Whitehorse as the hero that saves the day.

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HOLSTEE - About: The Holstee Manifesto - Live Your Dream

HOLSTEE - About: The Holstee Manifesto - Live Your Dream | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

[This is how you write an About Page and share your story!]

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Games as Stories: Developing Themes in Games

Games as Stories: Developing Themes in Games | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

I don't know how people come up with their stories but I can tell you how I come up with mine. I don't start with scenes or characters or settings or genres. I start with a tone and a theme, because those two things provide the guiding light as I try and uncover everything else.

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Content Marketing Storytelling: Secrets from the Big Screen

Content Marketing Storytelling: Secrets from the Big Screen | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
In this video post, Robert Rose, co-author with Joe Pullizzi of 'Managing Content Marketing,' discusses what brands can learn from big-screen storytelling, as well as from Joseph Campbell: creating 'heroic' content that speaks to your audience such...
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Progressive Disclosure and Storytelling

Progressive Disclosure and Storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

There's a popular technique in interaction design known as Progressive Disclosure. You can see this in wizard-style interfaces that show you a single question at a time.

 

This technique really reminds me of the way that narrative arcs often work. You have a bit of exposition, you get to know the characters and sometimes you start to like, identify with or hate the people in it. There's then a bit of confrontation or jeopardy, then possibly a climax and a resolution (if you're lucky). You're not told the entire story in one single shot, you're told it over a period of time. It's all about keeping the cognitive load to a minimum.

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How Storytelling Can Make Your Company More Attractive

How Storytelling Can Make Your Company More Attractive | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

Last Sunday I visited the Royal Observatory in Greenwich. Going to a museum is not necessarily the most engaging experience. Thankfully, I was wrong.
Despite the small size of the facilities, it caught my eye how this museum managed to capture the audience’s attention and retain it for longer at specific spots. The trick? They used smart storytelling. Let me explain.

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Eleven Laws of Great Storytelling

Eleven Laws of Great Storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

Throughout my eighteen years of screenwriting I have read and analyzed thousands of scripts from writers of all levels. During this time, I discovered eleven Laws of Great Storytelling – trends that tend to exist in many of the most memorable stories of all time. Of course, creating unforgettable heroes and villains is an integral part of all the Laws and should always be in the forefront of your mind as a writer.

 

So while it is impossible to have a foolproof objective formula for a great story, I have learned that if certain principles are followed, the probability of your story achieving a modicum of greatness increases dramatically. With this disclaimer firmly in place, here goes:

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Storytelling vs. Fragmentation

Storytelling vs. Fragmentation | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
When is a creative writer not a storyteller?

 

That was the question that came to my mind as I took in the lecture “The Lyric Essay: In Defense of a Fragmented Structure” here at my MFA residency at the Vermont College of Fine Arts. It was a graduation lecture by Emily Casey, a skilled writer I was privileged to be able to workshop with at my previous residency.

Emily is a poet turned fiction writer turned creative nonfiction writer. She’s graduating with both a fiction and CNF specialization here, not an easy task. But she doesn’t just write CNF; she embraces the “lyric essay,” which at its core embodies the antithesis of narrative structure. In other words, Emily the fiction storyteller now seeks consciously to not tell stories.

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Google’s Ad Campaign Uses Emotions, Not Search Terms

Google’s Ad Campaign Uses Emotions, Not Search Terms | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

Though Google is a household name, it needs to tell its story now for a few reasons. It needs new businesses like the Chrome browser and the Google Plus social network to succeed if it is going to find sources of revenue beyond search ads.

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The Global Skin

The Global Skin | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

[An interseting project...]

 

We want to produce a film with short videos from all over the world.

 

Get involved! Participate in the video competition.

 

How it works →

 

Shoot a story about someone who has something to do with textiles. Based on craft, politics, art, history, economy or... tell us what topic you have in mind!

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Building Org Cultures Through Storytelling

Building Org Cultures Through Storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

THE Tale, the Parable, and the Fable are all common and popular modes of conveying instruction. The Tale is a story either founded on facts, or sometimes just a figment of imagination. There are no moral lessons expected to be learned. The Parable is intended to convey secret meanings. Fables are intended to impact human behavior through the stories and the characters. Good and bad characters are clearly demarcated. Aesops fables have become a part of our everyday language. The story of the thirsty crow dropping pebbles in a pitcher to raise up the level of water is one of the first lessons in innovation we learned. The moral of the story is explicitly stated at the end eg “Necessity is the mother of invention” in case of the Crow and the Pitcher story.

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The best advice I’ve learned on mastering theme in storytelling

The best advice I’ve learned on mastering theme in storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

This post is a continuation of my "Best advice I've learned" series. You can catch up on my other posts by clicking "Character" or "Concept". 

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Evil storytelling tricks NO ONE SHOULD KNOW

Evil storytelling tricks NO ONE SHOULD KNOW | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
I don’t care what you’re writing: whether it’s spy thrillers, speeches, newspaper stories or romances about men in kilts, the only thing that matters to the reader is the journey you take them on.

How far – and how fast – is that ride? Where does it start and where does it end?

The roller coaster you take readers on is far, far more important than how pretty you’ve painted things with words.

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New Year’s Resolutions for Mobile Marketers

New Year’s Resolutions for Mobile Marketers | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

The essence of any brand is the story it conveys. This essence must be infused with creative vision and continuous innovation as its underlying narrative unfolds across a widening array of mediums to engage consumers and create a vision of a lifestyle to be desired. Traditionally the consumer has only been capable of experiencing the story in a disconnected way. Mobile, as a medium, is innately transitive in nature, serving as a persistent interface for consumers to navigate an ever-evolving digital ecosystem of retail touchpoints and become, themselves, players in the storytelling experience. Strategically dissecting the brand narrative to take on an episodic form allows the brand to engage audiences in the on-going drama, create desire to see where the story will lead, and establish emotional connections in the process. We will become more effective storytellers to inspire deeper levels of involvement and engagement with the brand.

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scott.forshay's comment, January 3, 2012 5:20 PM
Thank you for the coverage, Gregg!
Gregg Morris's comment, January 3, 2012 5:49 PM
Was a great post Scott!
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How Storytelling Improves Team Building

How Storytelling Improves Team Building | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

Struggling with this new position in middle management I was given disciplinary counseling three times during my first couple of months. The really interesting part of this is that I wasn't aware I was being "counseled." Larry would call me in his office, come out from behind his desk, sit beside me and tell a very funny story about something he had done when he was the Assistant Superintendent. He would describe in detail how he messed up and the problems it caused. Larry would end his story by asking me what I thought he should have done differently. These stories Larry told always bore a striking resemblance to something I had just done. But he never came across as accusatory or "bossy."

Therein lies the power of stories. Karin Evans and Dennis Metzger wrote a white paper for the American Society for Training and Development (ASTD), entitled Leadership Through Story Telling.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6772025

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