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So, There Were These Three Storytellers...

So, There Were These Three Storytellers... | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
New York has hundreds of classes on sketch, improv and joke writing — storytelling is rapidly catching up.

 

Photo:Béatrice de Géa for The New York Times

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Story and Narrative
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Technology Is Short, But Story Is Long

Technology Is Short, But Story Is Long | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
I have two questions for you:

What comes to mind when I say "Shakespeare?"

What comes to mind when I mention the "water wheel?"

Both were born in the 16th century. Both advanced Elizabethan culture in profound ways. One wrote "Romeo & Juliet."

That's the difference between platform and art.

Technology and story.

Technology can bring you stuff (like water and Facebook posts). Story can change your idea of the stuff you want brought to you.
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 14, 8:50 AM

(From the article): In fact, most of us (as marketers and as consumers) judge a platform by how well it performs 3 key functions: delivering stories we desire; when and where we desire them; in the form that's easiest to enjoy and share.

 

As Shakespeare liked to say, "The play's the thing!"

 

He never said, "The stage (or the platform) is the thing!"

 

That's why today's major technology and social media enterprises – Apple and Amazon and Facebook and Google – are in the throes of a hiring frenzy. Not just for developers and coders, but for art directors and writers and strategists and storytellers.

 

That's why Facebook, the behemoth that once cajoled marketers into adopting "more useful metrics" such as "likes" and "engagement," has unapologetically tossed its old playbook.

Patricia Stitson's curator insight, April 14, 12:37 PM

I agree but:

 

Will there come an age where a technology will become so integrated into the fabric of our collective story that it DOES not fade away... but rather like cultural stories or some religions, learns how to adapt to the changing framework of its own self?

 

The authors overall point is indisputable, story is at the heart of literally everything today, but I would counter that his argument about the fading of past technologies as the reason why we should focus on story is, well, itself archaic.  

 

The integration of story and technology is creating an online culture where one is indistinguishable from the other.  Not so with Beta Tapes of old.  That is HARD ware not SOFT ware.  The story was separate from the hardware that delivered it. 100%.  Not so with Facebook etc. I do not suppose to predict that FB will not be usurped by another platform as Friendster did. 

 

I am simply asking another question.  How is the presence of technology change the manner in which we view how we tell our story?  When will how we tell our stories become so dependent on technology that the latter itself become a part of the story.  Or has it already?

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Literary Study Finds All Modern Narratives Derived From Classic ‘Alien Vs. Predator’ Conflict

Literary Study Finds All Modern Narratives Derived From Classic ‘Alien Vs. Predator’ Conflict | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Explaining how the timeless clash between the two sides remains among the most elemental forms of storytelling worldwide, a study published Tuesday by researchers at Oxford University has concluded that virtually all modern narratives are re-expressions of the classic Alien Vs. Predator conflict.
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Brand Storytelling in a Digital World

Brand Storytelling in a Digital World | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
As digital expands into every facet of a consumer’s life, marketing strategy and brand storytelling must shift its focus to create content driven by consumer conversations and needs. So how do brands get there? How can a brand leverage the momentum of conversations consumers are already having?
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The Plump Comforts of a Story

My gripe is not with lovers of the truth but with truth herself. What succor, what consolation is there in truth, compared to a story? What good is truth at midnight, in the dark, when the wind is roaring like a bear in the chimney? What you need are the plump comforts of a story.

DIANE SETTERFIELD
Gregg Morris's insight:

Indeed...

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Brand Storytelling 101: The Essential Elements

Brand Storytelling 101: The Essential Elements | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Today, however, a brand has evolved into something far more powerful than just a look. It is actually your identity and personality. Certainly a “look” is one component of an identity—just watch people walk down the street. You can identify the hipster, the fashion diva, the gym rat, simply by their “looks”.

But their crafted looks are only one part of their respective stories, just as your logo and company colors are only one part of your story.
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Are Your Copywriters Good Story Tellers?

Are Your Copywriters Good Story Tellers? | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
I wanted to write about the importance of telling stories when creating campaigns and I wanted to write something with a little authority, so I looked for an Ogilvy quote because he said/wrote many memorable statements about the subject. In looking for a quote, I came across this page, but the quote that stood out for me was:

“I have a theory that the best ads come from personal experience. Some of the good ones I have done have really come out of the real experience of my life, and somehow this has come over as true and valid and persuasive”
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Storytelling In The Digital Media Age

Storytelling In The Digital Media Age | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
I often get asked why a Harvard neuropsychiatrist spends so much time talking about emotions and the brain in front of media and marketing research experts. The answer is that we live in an increasingly competitive world, and relying on what consumers tell us is incomplete, and in many cases just plain inaccurate.

Brand managers must understand how consumers engage on an emotional level in order to accurately predict whether their advertising or any other media content will truly resonate.
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The key to storytelling is in the giving, not the getting

The key to storytelling is in the giving, not the getting | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
The key to success with presentation—and storytelling in general—is to focus not on getting approval or a particular response from the audience, but on giving something meaningful to them. That is, it’s not about getting but about giving.
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Art Jones's curator insight, February 23, 3:55 PM

This book follows the age old saying which is: "you have to give to get". 

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Brand Bullshit Never Sleeps

Brand Bullshit Never Sleeps | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

"...the two most 'dreaded, hated' words at Apple under Steve Jobs were "branding" and "marketing.

...we understood deeply what was important about the product, what the team’s motivations were in the product, what they hoped that product would achieve, what role they wanted it to have in people’s lives

...The most important thing was people's relationship to the product. So any time we said 'brand' it was a dirty word."

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Turn Your Pivot Points into Stories for Better Content Marketing

Turn Your Pivot Points into Stories for Better Content Marketing | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
The problem with pivot points – events that result in major changes in your organization’s history or your personal career – is that they often slip by unnoticed. The significance of the event isn’t recognized until later.

You typically have to dig deep into the past to identify your pivots, the lessons they taught, and the opportunities they created. The reward for digging deep, however, is that past pivot points often uncover story opportunities that can help you define your brand and create memorable story-based content marketing.
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Dean Ryan G. Martin's curator insight, February 21, 6:23 AM

It's my first time to see a worksheet for content marketing. This makes the whole process easier.

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Narrating Narrating: Twisting the Twice-Told Tale

There is a structural/genetic continuity between everyday oral narrative and elaborate literary narratives, with listeners gradually becoming an audience. Literary stories which narrate some character's oral narrating keep us aware of this
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Rereading(,) Narrative(,) Identity(,) and Interaction

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Karen Dietz's comment, February 6, 1:42 PM
Thanks for finding this Gregg! I love it :)
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The Power of Storytelling in Social Media Marketing

The Power of Storytelling in Social Media Marketing | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
In advertising marketers interrupt the story people want to see with brand promotions that pay for it. Yet, in social media marketers must create the content people want to see. Brands must interest the audience themselves by telling a good brand story. But what makes a good story?

To research the power of story my colleague Michael Coolsen and I analyzed two years of Super Bowl commercials - the one time people choose to watch advertisements for the enjoyment of the ads themselves. We wanted to know which ads were the most liked, the ones that drew interest with buzz and votes to finish in the top of the advertising ratings polls.
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Tell Corporate Stories Like a TV Producer: Inform, Inspire, Engage

Tell Corporate Stories Like a TV Producer: Inform, Inspire, Engage | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
“We tell stories that are definitely not your norm. We do mini-documentaries … and think of them the way Dateline, 20/20, or 60 Minutes would. We try to find really fascinating stories, then tell them well … to evoke positive feelings about the company.”

This story-and-news approach helps cut through the fact that, as Burke admits, “EMC sells something that, quite frankly, is a little difficult for people to understand. Our job is to build an awareness of everything that ‘data storage’ really means.”
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How to Be a Storyteller

How to Be a Storyteller | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Creating good stories is how companies convince preoccupied, information-overloaded consumers there is something worth their time and interest. Whether a company’s stories engage, educate, or entertain, they encourage a consumer to pause, even if for a short time.

But here’s the key question: How do companies get started with storytelling? The answer: a five-step process that any company can embrace.
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The Power of Audio Storytelling

The Power of Audio Storytelling | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Story takes all that data and dramatizes or “storifies” it, so instead of making a list of facts, you tell a story that moves dynamically, positive, negative, and arouses great curiosity: How will this turn out?

It draws the audience and listeners into empathy with your core character – it hooks them intellectually and involves them emotionally so that when you reach the climax, the message at the climax moves them to act.

What I teach, Mark, at that seminar on March 19 is what I call the “Purpose Told Story.” It’s not fiction as entertainment. It’s using the story form to communicate a lot of information but dramatize and “storify” it so that at the end of the story, people are moved to take an action: To buy your product, to hire your service. That is the “Purpose Told Story.”

So story in business is very different than the story in Hollywood. It is designed to hook interest, to move people, emotionally involve them, and then trigger them to act. That last step is the most important of all.

It works because story is the natural form of thought.
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Stories Inside Healthcare

Stories Inside Healthcare | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Medical communication and goals for treatment focus on the disease or conditions but not the patient as a whole. At this larger level we are missing some points that might help improve both short-term and long-term ways people experience disease. I want to make the case for understanding both the patient journey at a medical level and understanding the patients life story or narrative as it relates to disease as an equal part of therapy planning.
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4 Steps to Creating Authentic Stories Your Customers Will Want to Read

4 Steps to Creating Authentic Stories Your Customers Will Want to Read | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Authentic stories help powerful brands make deep connections with customers. But that high-level principle creates real-world challenges for content marketers. What is a powerful story and how do you tell it? I’d like to share four tips on how to tell stories that make connections and get results.
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7 Examples of Great Storytelling For Boring Brands | SEJ

7 Examples of Great Storytelling For Boring Brands | SEJ | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Some brands are inherently sexy, like the Ford Mustang.

The name evokes an immediate feeling of caution-to-the-wind youth and speed. Even though it’s been around for ages, Ford does a pretty good job of keeping the Mustang image fresh and current. There’s a lot of material to work with: history, style, engineering, innovation (not to mention that it’s a sports car).

Sadly, we don’t all write content for Ford’s Mustang. Most brands are pretty darn boring. Marketers are called on to create compelling stories for things like toilet paper or tile grout and for companies that rent out heavy equipment or manufacture parts that go inside other products.

How do you work with that? And how do you convince an old-school CEO that the company’s story is worth telling?

Creating a great story means digging right into the heart of what makes a company or a product special. Here are some examples of brands big and small making it happen.
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Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose)'s curator insight, March 4, 3:46 PM

It can be challenging to find a great storytelling angle for an uninspiring brand. Sometimes, you have to tackle it from a new angle to make it work.  The key - remain authentic.

Dominique Taste's curator insight, March 13, 12:27 PM

Le storytelling est loin d'être réservé aux marques glamour, aux entreprises patrimoniales ou aux start-up flamboyantes. Il nécessite juste plus de créativité et un choix de techniques comme :

* utiliser le vocabulaire de votre cible,

* transformer ses clients en héros,

* traiter ses employés avec égard,

* créer une histoire de zéro

* ou utiliser l'humour pour traiter les sujets délicats.

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5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Instead of relying on a block of text, visual storytelling follows ‘show, don’t tell’ approach which results in greater engagement, traffic, and sales.
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Welcome to Narratopia

Welcome to Narratopia | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
The challenge of natural story sharing

So I started to think of what sort of game might work with the way people naturally tell stories in conversation. I thought about how:
Storytellers negotiate for the floor by submitting a story abstract to the group. Audience members accept, reject, or modify proposed stories during the story abstract.
Storytellers embed in their story evaluation statements that prove the story is worth listening to, and communicate their intent in telling it. Audience members redirect stories as they are being told by providing feedback, questions, and corrections.
Storytellers negotiate the end of their story (and the return to the normal conversational rhythm) in the story's coda. Audience members participate in fitting the story into the conversation by asking questions about it and discussing aspects of it.
Audience members respond to stories with related stories, building chains of connected stories in collaborative exploration of a topic.
This all happens without anyone being fully aware that it is happening. You can watch people do all of these things in any casual conversation anywhere in the world, and probably could watch the same thing happen thousands of years ago.
Gregg Morris's insight:

She got up before breakfast to think this one up! Really great stuff!

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Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 23, 3:04 PM

I go on about story sharing being the heart of effective storytelling. But what is that really? Here story colleague Cynthia Kurtz has written a brilliant -- and well thought out -- article on what story sharing is, how it happens, what it looks and feels like.


Even better, she puts it together in a game for us. Yay! Get your story game on. Read this post and get better and the dynamics of storytelling.


And many thanks go to @Gregg Morris for originally finding and sharing Cynthia's work. Thanks Gregg!

Dominique Taste's curator insight, February 24, 1:45 PM

Le jeu Narratopia utilise les procédés de gamification pour développer l'art de la conversation narrative. Il valorise la collaboration et l'exploration pour partager un storytelling oral.

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The Story Factor - "How to" Series

The Story Factor - "How to" Series | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
Sam Thurman’s story is short (5 minutes) and delightful. Please listen to it before reading my comments so you can have the full listener experience.     Imagery and Present Tense One of ...
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There's No Bullshit Like Brand Bullshit.

There's No Bullshit Like Brand Bullshit. | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it

But this is the new ideological world of marketing. Marketing is no longer about meeting the practical needs of customers. It's about high-minded principles of transparency and co-creating and conversations and... 

Well, I'm afraid I have a very old guy opinion. You want customers raving about your brand? Sell them a good fucking product.

Gregg Morris's insight:

Spot on!

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Story colored glasses: My left ear

Story colored glasses: My left ear | Story and Narrative | Scoop.it
As you know if you read this blog regularly (or as regularly as I write it, anyway), I have strong opinions about some things. For example:
I believe that storytelling should be seen not as an expert skill but as an innate capacity available to all human beings. 
I believe that the benefits of listening to stories and making sense of them should not depend on outside analysts, but should be available to groups of people working together for their own benefit. 
I believe that stories should be seen not as commodities to be consumed but as the lifeblood of families, communities, organizations, and societies. 
I have spent fifteen years working toward these goals, and I am passionate about them. But I've also thought a lot about whether being passionate about a goal is a help or a hindrance in meeting that goal. This essay is about those thoughts.
Gregg Morris's insight:

You're going to have to invest a bit of time but it will be well worth it!

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