Stories - an experience for your audience -
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Stories - an experience for your audience -
- Everyone - every company, organization has a story. Tell it, we all can learn and benefit from your story but be authentic, real
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Storytelling Tips for Leaders - No. 1 Spotting Stories

http://www.anecdote.com/StorytellingForLeaders You can't get the benefits of storytelling without telling stories. So the first step is getting good at spott...

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Marty Koenig's comment, March 9, 2013 3:13 PM
Right on, I call it THE BIG WHY.
Karen Dietz's comment, March 10, 2013 2:22 PM
Love it Marty!
Leaders Online's curator insight, March 13, 2013 6:48 AM

Om je visie als leider goed over te kunnen brengen is een goede story belangrijk - on- en offline! Hier een paar handige tips om in de gaten te hebben of je het eigenlijk wel een verhaal is - of alleen een promotie-praatje...

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Concise Storytelling for Leaders Video

Concise Storytelling for Leaders Video | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
JD Schramm, Stanford GSB lecturer in organizational behavior and director of the Mastery in Communication Initiative, presents this workshop specifically des...

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Karen Dietz's comment, March 2, 2013 3:44 PM
I agree Annette! It would be a wonderful and enriching experience.
Flutura Decision Sciences & Analytics's comment, March 9, 2013 7:53 AM
Thanks Karen ... this was a brilliant share ... changed my perspective dramatically ...Keep them coming
Karen Dietz's comment, March 10, 2013 2:20 PM
Thank you Derick! So glad you found it helpful and I will keep 'em coming :))
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One customer story sells, and another doesn’t. Why?

One customer story sells, and another doesn’t. Why? | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

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Jeanne Melanson's curator insight, February 17, 2013 10:02 AM

This is a very good article.  For anyone who uses other people's stories and successes in your business, it's a must read.

corneja's comment, February 17, 2013 6:12 PM
Why the link doesn´t work in my case? I have tried to accede several times and always got a 404 Page Not Found! :-(
Karen Dietz's comment, February 18, 2013 12:03 PM
Hi -- don't know why the link doesn't work. Here it is again: http://insightdemand.com/uncategorized/customer-story-sells-doesnt-why/
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We Need Social Producers: Catalysts for Conversations, Info & ROI

We Need Social Producers: Catalysts for Conversations, Info & ROI | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

This piece came to me from my fellow curator Jan Gordon. She is an EXCELLENT curator and if you follow her curation it will help your business a lot.

What I really like about this piece is its basic question -- are you sharing your biz stories for messaging or for engagement? These are two very different activities and will generate different results for your business.

Read Jan's excellent review below, read Brian Solis' article, and start shifting your storytelling so you can achieve better business results!


This wonderful piece was written by Brian Solis and as always, he captured the essence of what's needed to move your content to the next level, where your audience becomes an active participant. This is where relationships and communities are built, brand advocates, word of mouth and commerce follows if this is done right.

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

Social Producers are the new storytellers

 

**To thrive in social, mobile and new media in general, we need much more than content producers, we need a new breed of designers that grasp the elements of online sharing and have mastered the ART of social media

 

**They know how to  trigger desirable (and social) actions, reactions and transactions

 

**A new genre of social producers are taking aim at developing content strategies that are not only consumable, they're shareable, actionable and act as catalysts or sparks for relevant conversations.

 

**These social producers are in fact masters of their domains and understand the culture and the laws of information commerce within each

 

The difference between Social Producers and traditional content creators is they begin with social outcomes

 

**they understand the relationship between cause and effect and they bake-in conversation starters related to an integrated and business-focused strategy

 

**Social producers think about the overall experience and the effect where a social object is at the center of the dialogue and interaction they envision....within each network

 

**The overall story and outcome defines the nature of the social object.

 

Takeaway

 

**Beyond shareability, the social producers also think about resonance. Conversations on social networks move quickly.


**What was trending an hour ago gives way to  the next social object that captures everyone's attention until that too is replaced by the next shiny object and so on.


**Resonance is a technique that allows a social object to enjoy a greater lifespan and continue to swim upstream while other content strategies wash away in real-time.


**As you think about your content strategy for social networks, do so from the perspective of a social producer.

 

**While the social effect is certainly a goal, the social effect is also the result of social design.

 

**In the end, people are going to talk, so give them something to talk about!

 

Curated by Jan Gordon covering, "Curation, Social Business and Beyond"

 

Read full article here: [http://bit.ly/Qvxa6J]


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janlgordon's comment, September 25, 2012 11:10 AM
Marty, I loved your insights and comments, right on the money - this is indeed one of those articles that ignites that spark in me and I can see in you as well - taking static content and moving it to the next level. Thank you for your kind words and wisdom as well.
Martin (Marty) Smith's comment, September 25, 2012 12:05 PM
Thanks Jan. I think your notes are more valuable than the article and this is NOT the first time that has been true :). Certainly the article by itself isn't as powerful as article + your note, so the very definition of the benefit of content curation - content becomes more valuable with each touch :). M
Josette Williams's comment, October 1, 2012 4:14 PM
Really happy you like this article Gust.
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How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It

How To Ask [for stories]--And Listen [to stories]--Like You Mean It | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Questions are the expressive, probing language for growing others; listening is the receptive, facilitating language for growing others. These two complementary approaches form a continuous growth conversation loop.

 

Leaders who are helping others to grow and innovate are always trying to craft the best questions to make a difference. Here's how to ask the questions that will propel your team and your organization forward.

 

Listening -- I mean listening really well -- is sometimes hard to do. Here's a great article by Kevin Cashman, author of The Pause Principle, reminding us that the more deeply and authentically we can listen to another, the deeper our questions go, and the deeper our understanding becomes.

 

Listening deeply is the first storytelling skill to build -- so you know which story to share or ask for. And then so you can dig more deeply into the story to understand what it really means.

 

For leaders, this is essential. For anyone wanting to master business storytelling, it is critical. Many marketing and branding folks have still not caught on to listening as being a vital component when using stories.

 

Sooooo -- here's a reminder that also contains some great insights, a list of what not to do, and a nice section on the power of authentic questions.

 

Now I'll go on a hunt and see if I can find an article for you just on the Art of the Question. For as they say in Appreciative Inquiry, the question is the intervention -- so knowing how to craft and ask the question is key.

 

In the meantime, enjoy this article.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How To Tell A Story—Right Now—From A Master Of Improv

How To Tell A Story—Right Now—From A Master Of Improv | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
What we say matters a great deal, but so does what we don’t say. There are times when you just can’t afford to clam up when called upon to contribute.

 

I love that this article is approaching storytelling skills from the field of improv -- because we receive a couple of good (maybe new) insights.

 

Like "whatever makes a memory a memory makes it interesting" and "know when to hold back."

 

Many of these are good common sense rules that can often be forgotten. And I just like that even though when you read closely, a lot of this material sounds familiar, the voice from the improv world makes me think about some of these tips in different ways. That is always a good thing!

 

Oh, and BTW  -- it is hard to find good articles on story TELLING skills. There is always tons of stuff on story structure and story crafting. But live storytelling skills -- not so much. Another reason I doubly appreciate this article!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf 

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.


2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.


4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.


OK -- on to what I do like!


If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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Tell Me a Story -- 8 Tips for Powerful Narratives That Drive Social Impact

Tell Me a Story -- 8 Tips for Powerful Narratives That Drive Social Impact | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Recently, everywhere I go, people ask me how to tell a more effective story. Advocates, colleagues, and clients observe that the organizations that achieve policy goals, get transformative grants, or seize the market’s interest are the ones that 1) have the resources to disseminate their story, and 2) just tell the better story. I would argue that the real winners are the organizations that actually manage to tell a story at all.

 

What a great article by Eric Friedenwald-Fishman for Stanford Social Innovation Review.

 

I like that he immediately identifies that many organizations, when they think they are telling a story, actually are not. So so true.

 

I also like that he mentions that organizations who do manage to tell a story well, also spend the resources needed to disseminate it. Too many businesses forget this essential piece.

 

The 8 tips he shares that create a powerful story that moves people to action are solid. What is unique is his tip The Power of the People -- where he advocates "Amplifying the voices of the people most affected by an issue increases the story’s authenticity and relevance. Including quotes, testimonials, eyewitness accounts, and personal narrative makes the story more interesting."  This point is often unrecognized in org story circles.

 

All in all, I like how Eric languages these tips -- many will be familiar to you, but hearing them in a new way always opens our minds to new insights or ideas.

 

In the end, the author asks how to put these tips to good use. He offers 4 questions to get us started that again, are different than what you typically read.

 

Enjoy this piece!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Can Business Storytelling Be Taught?

Can Business Storytelling Be Taught? | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

In business, people get promoted to leadership positions because they’re smart, driven experts in a field. Upon promotion, they find that that’s not enough. Now they need to be great communicators who can engage hearts and minds, rallying teams to take action on a strategic vision.

 

On the title of this post:  uh Duh!!

 

On the content of this post? Eh.

 

So why include it in this collection?  Because it illustrates common misconceptions of how to teach storytelling skills in business. 

 

So how do you teach storytelling skills?

First:  build deep listening skills. People cannot tell stories effectively without learning how to listen first -- for the story and how it wants to be told, and to the audience and what it needs to hear. Those are just a few pieces of effective deep listening.

 

Second: you can show video examples of great storytellers. But frankly, if the person leading the storytelling workshop can't model effective storytelling, then don't bother. That usually requires being trained in storytelling. Modeling is an essential leadership skill and modeling effective storytelling is your ticket to success.

 

Third: the tip about using memory triggers is a good one. Learning how to evoke stories in others though goes beyond simply finding your own personal stories. It is also knowing the 'Art of Crafting the Question' and going back to deep listening.

 

Fourth: practice telling your stories orally. If you can tell an effective story orally, then it is much easier to transfer that story into the written or digital world. Some people will need to write their stories first, but frankly, if a leader can't come up with a story and share it orally in the moment, that person has not developed their storytelling skills well enough. Learning oral story skills is essential. And I really like that the article encourages us to work with partners to build story skills. Yes!

 

Story structure is helpful to know -- and this part of the article I do like.

 

And I love the last 3 paragraphs!! The points are right on and need to be taken to heart if you want to be a successful sharing stories for growing your business, leadership, or organizational culture work.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 


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Seven tips in digital storytelling from the New York Times and CNN

Seven tips in digital storytelling from the New York Times and CNN | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

"We are in a golden age of storytelling" was the message shared by the New York Times's assistant managing editor Jim Roberts early on in a session at the News World Summit today named 'Obituary: The death of the traditional news story".

 

This article is slanted toward journalists. But think about it -- if you are using content, or creating content in your business to drive sales, then in many ways you are being a journalist. Especially if you attend conferences or events and report on those later to your customers/community.

 

So these 7 tips are pretty interesting and I bet you can incorporate many of them as your develop and promote your content. Like, 'avoid the 900-word valueless story' and 'incorporate live feeds' into your content. Hmmm -- that's an intesting one to get your head wrapped around. But that could be a lot of fun to do, especially at conferences or events.

 

So check these tips out. They are not your typical 'digital storytelling tips' that are a dime-a-dozen on the web. And I hope you get some good ideas!

 

Review written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Giuseppe Mauriello's comment, June 1, 2012 1:14 AM
Hi Karen,
thank you so much for appreciation about my suggestion.
Karen Dietz's comment, June 1, 2012 5:49 PM
You are the best Giuseppe! Thank you for thinking of me :)
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The Secret to Making Your Writing Stand Out Online

The Secret to Making Your Writing Stand Out Online | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Have you ever considered leveraging the ever-effective power of a good story when you write? Check out none other than this article to master the art!

 

This is a fabulous article with well written examples of online storytelling written for businesses.

 

I enjoy all the points the article makes about the power of sharing a well-crafted story online, and how to get started doing this yourself.

 

Modeling effective storytelling is one of the best ways to learn storytelling skills. This article has it in spades.

 

And it includes specific action steps and how-to's. And it's inspiring.

 

Once you read this you will understand how cool the Story Wheel app is (curated on this page), and hopefully get ideas for how to use it well as another way to share your business stories.


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Karen Dietz's comment, April 16, 2012 10:57 AM
Many thanks Hans! Hope you are having an awesome week :)
Karen Dietz's comment, April 16, 2012 12:52 PM
Thank you again Anna! Have an awesome week :)
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Wrapped up in a Book: The Role of Emotional Engagement in Reading -- & Storytelling!

Wrapped up in a Book: The Role of Emotional Engagement in Reading -- & Storytelling! | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Have you ever gotten lost in the pages of a good book? If so, you may have been more empathetic afterward. According to new research published in PLOS ONE, reading fiction may affect the reader’s empathetic skills over a period of time.


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Karen Dietz's comment, March 2, 2013 3:42 PM
I agreed Fred. And yes Miklos, I love it when what we know to be true is validated by research.
Kala's comment, March 4, 2013 10:08 AM
A big thank you for your overall curation work about storytelling! You are the very first one I see doing it so "intelligently", with real added-value :)
Karen Dietz's comment, March 5, 2013 1:26 PM
Thank you so much Kala! You have made my day :)
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The Science of Storytelling: 6 Ways to Write More Persuasive Stories : @ProBlogger

The Science of Storytelling: 6 Ways to Write More Persuasive Stories : @ProBlogger | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Guest post by Gregory Ciotti. When it comes to crafting words that sell, the research shows us that stories are ...

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Karen Dietz's comment, February 21, 2013 5:02 PM
So true Renee! I concur with comeja -- thanks for both of your comments!
ozziegontang's curator insight, February 21, 2013 5:03 PM

Read Karen Dietz's insights

Ignacio Conejo Moreno's curator insight, February 22, 2013 6:49 AM

Seis claves para contar historias perfectas:

1- Audiencia (target)

2- Realismo

3- Engadgement

4- Imágenes

5- Estructura

6- Contexto

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10 Tips to Help You Make an Impact with Your Story - Giving Voice to Your Story

10 Tips to Help You Make an Impact with Your Story - Giving Voice to Your Story | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

"To truly give voice to your story in a way that feels right for yourself and your business, you need the following ingredients which if you’ll notice, these tips can also be adapted to help you live a more fulfilling and happier life:"


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Karen Dietz's curator insight, December 19, 2012 3:21 PM

I LOVE this list -- because it is totally different than what you might expect from yet another article with a storytelling list!


Here the author Dorit Sasson focuses on YOUR relationship with the story you want to tell -- and how to get emotionally clear about it before you ever tell it.


Now why in the heck is this important? Because stories are all about conveying emotion and engaging emotions along the way to delivering a key message and meaning.


But if you are not clear about your emotional connection to the story, chances are you will flop when sharing it. You won't connect to your audience. 


So go grab this list. Check off what you can. Work on what you need to. Get way better at storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling atwww.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

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How To Tell A Story -- Story Wars 10 Simple Strategies

This is a Change This PDF that you can view here:

http://changethis.com/manifesto/98.01.StoryWars/pdf/98.01.StoryWars.pdf ;

 

I'm curating this because I like it and I don't like it -- and it is worth taking a look at the assumptions going on in this piece so we can get really smart.

 

This piece was put together by Jonathan Sachs, author of Winning The Story Wars. Sachs comes from the world of marketing and branding and this is reflected in his point of view.

 

Let's get what I don't like out of the way so I can chat about what I do like. Here is what puts my teeth on edge:


1. Sachs states that "we live in a world that has lost its connection to traditional myths and we are now trying to find new ones..." Welllllllll, if your slice of reality is the Hollywood, advertising, and branding world it is easy to get sucked into this notion. But we know from Jung, other psychologists, Folklorists, Anthroplogists, and neuroscience how this is not true. There is great irony in this "myth" that Sachs is perpetuating.

 

2. We are engaged in a war. Hmmmmm. Well, for millenium people have wanted to gain the attention of other people -- so nothing new there. Is this a war?  Could be. But if we are wanting to employ the power of storytelling to find solutions and create change as Sachs advocates, then war does not speak to the greater good but instead speaks to winners and losers where ongoing resentment is inherently built in. That sounds like the perpetuation of war -- same old same old. 

 

3. Sach's relationship to storytelling is still at the transactional level -- I'll tell you a story and you'll do what I want. While what he really wants it seems is storytelling at the transformational level. That requires a different mind-set and different story skills -- deep listening, engagement, story sharing, etc. And he completely ignores the relational level of storytelling.

 

4. Reliance on the Hero's Journey as the only story archetype to follow. Well, that's a narrow slice of reality and one geared towards youth. Yet other story archetypes are desperately needed: King/Queen, Trickster, Magician for example in order to affect change.

 

5. As a result, his 10 simple strategies stay at the transactional level with a few geared towards transformation (figure out what you stand for, declare your moral, reveal the moral). Now any great professional storyteller will tell you these that I've mentioned are essential for any compelling storytelling session. So they land in both worlds of transactional and transformational storytelling.

 

OK -- on to what I do like!

 

If you want to be heard, you'd better learn to tell better stories. The solutions to our significant problems these days depends on our ability to tell great stories and inspire people to think differently. Storytelling does not take long to learn, but it does take a lifetime to master, Know what a story is and is not Our abilitiy to disseminate stories is greater now than in the past -- because of technology. That is just a reminder to expend your use of different channels in sharing your stories that are now available to us.

 

Enough! Go read this piece yourself and decide what you think about it. It's a quick read.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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Meri Walker's comment, September 20, 2012 1:15 PM
Well, Karen! You made my day offering this terrific new Scoop. I'm enriched by the way you think, Karen. Especially about story... I guess we get really "bent" in a certain way by anthropological training and it's still pretty rare to find others who are looking through the kinds of filters you and I have installed in Mind. De-light-ful learning with and from you!
Jane Dunnewold's comment, April 8, 2013 4:42 PM
I'm behind the curve on this one, being new to scoop it - but as a teacher/artist I have to agree with your observation that delving into other archetypes would present rich opportunities to "language" storytelling in lots of environments. I use archetypes to get at the fears and struggles artists face in my workshops - and they aren't all about the hero's path! The Damsel in Distress is one that comes to mind...
Karen Dietz's comment, April 8, 2013 4:56 PM
I agree Jane. Archetypes can be so helpful in many ways. One of the ones I love for artists is the Trickster archetype, and the Magician. LOL on the 'damsel in distress'! Time to go put my 'big girl' panties on and deal with the next challenge :)
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Policy experts need to lead by storytelling -- fab lessons for us all

Policy experts need to lead by storytelling -- fab lessons for us all | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
The best way for a leader to persuade people to accept a counterintuitive health message is to craft a compelling narrative.

 

What a great story and insights this article contains. With lessons for us all in leadership, marketing, and social change.

 

Here is Kenneth Lin, a leader in public health, who shares his story of resigning his position because of clashing narratives. And his frustration with the truth narrative losing out. But he doesn't give up. He keeps going, and shares his insights about grand narratives, leadership, and perseverence with us.

 

For example -- are you telling micro or macro narratives? If you are telling micro narratives and expecting social change, it won't happen.

 

And how do you share a narrative that counters people's beliefs when those beliefs contain inaccurate assumptions? Every leader and social change agent wants to know the answer to that one.

 

Lin might not solve all of these problems in this blog post, but his insights about leadership, stories, and social change are worth the read and give us hope when meeting roadblocks.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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How to Weave a Story that Instantly Captivates Your Audience

How to Weave a Story that Instantly Captivates Your Audience | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
Most writers neglect the power of a story to captivate their audience immediately ...

 

This is a quick article with several key messages. But the one that strikes me is that when crafting a story, the most interesting beginning that gets reader's hooked, is often found in the middle of the story.


So true! And I love the example he uses to demonstrate this tip.

 

Beginnings and endings of stories are always hard for those new to storytelling. Even veteran storytellers could benefit from the author's tip here.

 

Think about your stories -- do they need an upgrade by exploring their middles and finding a more compelling opening?

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


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2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story

2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story #branding http://t.co/dSTW1KN1...

 

Want to up your marketing game? Then here are two resources for you recommended by a a great Internet marketer Dan Schawbel.

 

Both are books that look really intriguing. One is about a visual guide to writing effective website copy, which I think is quite a unique take on how you put together your website text.

 

The other book is about seven ways to tell the story of your personal brand.

 

Go read Dan's reviews and see if these books would be helpful to you. Enjoy!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by Hans Heesterbeek from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
Scoop.it!

2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story

2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it
2 Key Resources for Crafting and Telling Your Story #branding http://t.co/dSTW1KN1...

 

Want to up your marketing game? Then here are two resources for you recommended by a a great Internet marketer Dan Schawbel.

 

Both are books that look really intriguing. One is about a visual guide to writing effective website copy, which I think is quite a unique take on how you put together your website text.

 

The other book is about seven ways to tell the story of your personal brand.

 

Go read Dan's reviews and see if these books would be helpful to you. Enjoy!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;


Via Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by Hans Heesterbeek from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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Five types of leadership storytelling & when to use each

Five types of leadership storytelling & when to use each | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

Just how many types of stories are there, you ask? The answer is, as usual, it depends who you ask. Various storytelling aficionados categorize stories in different ways, and there are no hard and fast rules.

 

These are overviews of each (read the full article for more details and prompts to help you come up with each type of story):

1. Introducing me

2. Conveying values

3. Teaching

4. Jumpstarting action

5. Inspiring

 

Here's the link to the full article: http://www.internal-monologue.com/2012/07/careful-around-campfire-five-types-of.html ;

 

These 5 broad categories and the examples shared in each are really good and will build a good foundation for leadership storytelling. According to Paul Smith in his forthcoming book on leadership storytelling "Lead With A Story" (August 20112), there are actually 21 different categories/applications for leaders to know about and use.

 

But this article brings clarity to the topic and will definitely get you started!

 

Thank you to fellow curator Gimli Goose for this article!


Via Kim Zinke (aka Gimli Goose), Karen Dietz
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Rescooped by Hans Heesterbeek from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Power of Storytelling; What Marketers Can Learn From Casey Neistat and Google

The Power of Storytelling; What Marketers Can Learn From Casey Neistat and Google | Stories - an experience for your audience - | Scoop.it

And, last Saturday morning, before I got up and on with my day, I watched his short film entitled ‘Guthrie Beach Raft’ and it got me thinking about the power of storytelling in marketing.

 

Yes, successful marketing is all about emotions -- not facts.

 

There are two videos to view here that make the author's point. The first video is OK -- for whatever reason it didn't really grab me.

 

But the second video about Google Chrome is a hit! That's because it tells a very engaging story about how someone uses Google's integrated suite of tools. It's brilliant.

 

Enjoy both of these -- and take these lessons to heart. When creating your content, decide which emotions you want to evoke in your audience and then craft your material to evoke those. 

 

As the author says, "Sometimes, facts and figures are great, but if you’re really looking to create loyalty and build a relationship with your audience then creating an emotional bond is the way forward."


Via Karen Dietz
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